Admiralty Letter Book

East African Anti Slave Trade Campaign
1868-1871


The following letters are a selection taken from a Letter Book which appears to have been kept by the Admiralty Office from 1868 to 1871 (approx 700 pages).  It records all correspondance to and from British Naval personnel involved in operations off the East Coast of Africa.  In particular the notes relate to Commodore Leopold George Heath (later Adm Sir Leopold George Heath).  His primary role was to patrol the seas off the East Coast of Africa, to intercept and apprehend any boats involved in the shipment of Slaves.  In addition he was also involved in an expedition to Abyssinia for the relief of the British Consul Mr.Rassam, who had been detained in captivity by King Theodore.

Foreward

Extract from “Records of the Heath Family”, published 1913.  During his retirement Admiral Sir Leopold George Heath wrote a short biography of his life (1885).  The part of this biography relating to the period covered by the following Letter Book reads as follows:


In April 1863, he left the Cambridge, and became Vice-President of the Ordnance Select Committee at Woolwich, but as the committee met, as a rule, but three times a week, Captain Heath was enabled to live at Anstie Grange, which was by this time completed. He remained in this appointment until June, 1867, and during those four years he did much good service in advising on the various inventions connected with the public services, which were submitted to the Committee, and particularly to the change then gradually being made by the introduction of rifled ordnance in substitution of smooth bores. The 10-inch gun of 18 tons, which for a considerable time was the largest and most successful gun in the Naval service, was built at his suggestion, and on his design as to its rifling. On leaving the Committee, he was appointed 2nd class Commodore on the East Indian station, and hoisted his broad pennant on board H.M.S. “Octavia” at Bombay. In the autumn of this year it was determined to send an expedition to Abyssinia for the relief of our consul Mr.Rassam, who was detained in captivity by King Theodore, and Captain Heath was promoted temporarily to 1st class, and took charge of the Naval portion of the expedition. He left Bombay in his flagship Octavia, on December 21st, having on board Sir Robert Napier, the Commander-in-chief and his staff. The spot chosen for the landing of the expedition was Zoulla, in Annesley Bay, in the Red Sea, and here the men-of-war and transports assembled, and the work of landing troops and stores was carried out incessantly and energetically by the Navy.

At Zoulla, everything had to be provided. Stone houses to be built, and piers for landing to be made, but the greatest drawback to the site was that there was no fresh water, and everything had to be supplied by condensation of salt water.

The maintenance of this supply was a difficult matter, but fortunately some of the transports were fitted up with engines of a modern type, in which surface condensation was adopted, and by a little ingenuity they were arranged so as to give off fresh water of an excellent quality. Commodore Heath sent up with the troops a small body of sailors forming a rocket brigade, and they did excellent service, and were much praised by Sir Robert Napier. The expedition having succeeded in its object, returned and re-embarked at Zoulla in June, 1868.

The total force landed was as follows:-\
Infantry and Cavalry   14,214
Cavalry horses and Staff horses  2,538
Natives and Soldiers   26,254
Land transport, horse or mules   19,580
Camels     6,045
Bullocks     7,086
Donkeys     1,850
Elephants    44

27,470 tons of water was manufactured and landed for the use of the troops, and an additional 9,563 tons was supplied for the use of the transports on their return voyage.

For his services on this occasion Commodore Heath received the thanks of Parliament in the following terms, (identical in both Houses) “That the thanks of the house be given to Commodore Heath, Royal Navy, Companion of the most honourable Order of the Bath, for the indefatigable zeal and great ability with which he conducted the Naval operations connected with the transport of the troops and stores upon which the Expedition materially depended.” He was also made a K.C.B. Sir Leopold Heath was made an A.D.C. to Her Majesty in February 1869. He remained in command of the East Indian Squadron until the end of 1870, his time having expired, when he returned to England on half-pay.


Admiralty Letter Book, 1868-1871, East Coast of Africa

The following is a selection of correspondence taken from the Admiralty Letterbook and reads as follows: 

No.1

Act.d 18.9.67.M73
18/6/67 M.S.Octavia
Bombay 29th July 1867

I have the honor to inform you for the information of the L.C.A. that I reached this port from Suez Canal on the 23rd July, and that H.M.S. Octavia having arrived from Trincomalee on the 26th Rear Admiral Hillyer gave up command on the 28th and that I this day hoisted my Broad Pendant.
I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secetary of the Admiralty


No.2
Act..18.9.67.M.72
Reply Hyd.1.Sept.67
HMS ‘Octavia’ Bombay
2nd August 1867

Sir,
With a view to any operations that my be carried on in Abyssinia, I have the honor to request that you will cause me to be supplied with a copy Keith M…. map of Abyssinia and Nubia which is held as I understand it at Stamfords Charing Cross.
I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary of the Admiralty.


No.3
Actnd  18.6.67.M.72
H.M.S.”Octavia” Bombay
3rd August.1867

Sir,
In accordance with Act.3 Page 302 of the Queens Regulations …Admiralty Secretary I have the honor to inform you that I have adopted the Printed orders of the Station, published by Rear Admiral George King in 1865.
I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.

No.4
Inclusures
Submitted
3rd Augst.  67.
Act nd  18.9.67 ..
Reply 5 Sept 67..

M.S.”Vigilant”. Port Louis
Mauritius, 16 July 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to request that you will m… L.C.A. to confirm Mr Keenan in the rank of Gunner, he having served the necessary period of 12 months on the 4th July 1867 & for which time he has produced satisfactory certificates, of which I enclose copies.
I have etc
(Sd) F.A.Brown
Commander

Commodore Hillyar
Gen.. …
Bombay


No.5
Submitted
3rd August.1867

No.7
Act nd  18 Sept 67/M/72
H.M.S.”Octavia” Bombay
5th August 1867

Sir,
With reference to Rear Admirals Hillyar’s letter of the 2nd July …of enclosing a report of Survey on the defects discovered at Trincomalee in the stern frame of H.M.S.”Octavia”, & recommending that the ship  should be docked at Suez in order to effect the necessary repairs.
I have the honor to inform you that  I have made every enquiry in my power to ascertain the relative advantage s of docking her and at Suez, & that I have come to the conclusion that although the dock at Suez is deeper than any at this port and consequently the ship could be taken in with much less disturbance of the weights on board, yet this advantage of being as it were at home in Bombay, with all the facilities of a government establishment at my command will more than compensate for the greater amount of work which will have to be preformed by the ships company.
2.  Captain Henry Superintendent of the P&O company at this port, will undertake to dock the “Octavia” in the Ritchie Dock during the months of November, December and January provided the draft does not exceed 20 feet, 9 inches.
3,  From a record kept by the carpenter of the daily draft whilst the ship was fitting out it appears that with engines and boilers and screw propeller in topsail & lower yards across the ship drew 21 feet aft & 17 feet forward, should this be correct, the ship… doubtless when cleared as above and the screw with a few extra weights placed on the Bows be brought below the required draft but I should be glad to have the Carpenter Record verified by the Controller of the Navy.
4.  Their Lordships may perhaps adopt the alternative of fitting out another ship to relieve the “Octavia” sending her home for repair as soon as relieved, in that case I venture to suggest that the “Octavia” class is well suited for the Senior Officers Ship on this station, but that if 6½ ….Guns should be fitted on the main deck in lieu of the 14 ins smooth bores in the “Octavia” the deck being stiffened and strengthened in the …of the heavy guns economically and readily by the introduction of a T iron beam (connected by occasional cross pieces with the wood in beams) intermediately between each wooden beam.
5.  A ship, so armed, would, by making use of the lighter guns for firing exclusively at the enemy’s port holes and through her superior …power be more than a match for any iron-clad likely to be sent into these waters.
6.  I would suggest also, that thorough ventilation by means of large Cowls should be given to the bread rooms, and that  in lieu of the timber ventilating holes usually placed above the shelf pieces of the main and lower decks, through which in the “Octavia” most unpleasant and unhealthy effluria pass into the cabins and messes places, the system of Dr.Edwards should be adopted, or the air holes made under and outside the Hammock settings.
7.  (Cancelled by their Lordships telegram of the 6th August. 1867)
I sail for  Trincomalee on the 10th …. Remaining there (making perhaps a port visit to Madras) until October and I will be glad to receive their Lordships instructions by Telegraph direct to Trincomalee (cross out) Bombay
I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore
 
The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.8
1 Enclosure

Actnd 18 Sept 67.M.71

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
7 Augst 1867

Sir,
Their Lordships will perceive from a from a paragraph in Capt. Bedingfelds report of proceedings dated the 14th July (my letter No._ of this date) as also from his quarterly Steam report sent herewith, that the … is in urgent and immediate need of new boilers.
2.  The Ship appears from the nave list to have been nearly 4 years in commission and I would suggest that she should be sent home under sail to be paid off.
Requesting their Lordships instructions by direct to Trincomalee (cross out) Bombay
I have etc
L.G.Heath
Commodore


No.9.
Submitted
7 Augst 67.

Actnd 18 Sept:67.M.72

H.M.S. Penguin
Zanzibar. 30th June 1867

Sir,
Having been employed for a short time this last season for the suppression of the Slave Trade on the Northern part of the Coast of …(Aden?) I have the honor of forwarding you the following Report. On my arrival at Muscat the beginning of May, His Highness the Sultan informed me that 5 or 6 vessels had already attempted to land slaves near that town, and several others had passed on their way to town to the Northern and and (sic) the Persian Gulf before the setting of the S.W.Monsoon by taking advantage of land winds and keeping close into shore, moreover the monsoon sets in sooner to the Northward than it does to the Southwards. Slave Dhows from the Gulf of Aden bound for Muscat leave the Gulf the middle of March. I should recommend vessels not to remain of Ras el Ha.. after the beginning of May. If they should have slaves on board and bound for Aden, they will stand a great chance of having to contend against the S.W.Monsoon and a strong Northerly current in which case they would have to make a sailing passage to Aden which would take them at least 6 weeks. I was off Ras el Has in this Ship on the 10th May and had serious doubts to (as to) whether I should have been able to get to Aden without making a long passage as it was we had to steam a greater part of the way.
I believe a vessel stationed off the Island of Socotra (?) the end of September and during the month of October would intercept the Slave Dhows from the Coast of Africa that preceed North about that time of the year. None of H.M.Vessels have I believe as yet been Stationed on that part of the coast during that Season.
Although so many Slave Dhows were captured last year by the H.M. A….. yet I believe the Trade to have been this last season as brisk as ever. My information being from the most intelligent of the Slaves that I took in a Dhow bound from the Coast of Africa to Muscat last May.
I have etc
Ld. J…. G…
Lient Homon.


Storekeeper
General
H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
1st Augt. 1987

Sir,
I have the honor to request that you will cause me to be furnished with 12 Guard Books for the Keeping of Admiralty Letters re none being on the Station.

Snd ..L.G. Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Somerset House
London …


Controller of
Victualling

Reply.6 Sept.67. ..

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
1st Augt 1867

Sir,
Having this day taken command of the East Indian Station as Commodore of the 2nd Class I have the honor to request that you will cause me to be furnished with the usual proportions of ---

Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Somerset House
London –


Storekeeper
General

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
2nd Augt 1867

Sir,
With reference to the Plate, Linen, Cutlery etc, transported to me by Rear Admiral Hillyer, I bed to state that the Dish C----ss , Cutlery and Linen are very much worn. Under the circumstances I have to request that in apportioning the usual per centage chargeable on these articles you will be pleased to take into consideration their deteriorated value.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary of
The Admiralty
Somerset House
London –


No.10
2 Enclosures

Actnd 18 Sept:67. M.72
Reply 24 Dec.M.165

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
6th August 1867.

Sir,
In continuation of Rear Admiral’s --- letters of the 13th March and 15th June 1867 --- 40 & 83 upon the above subject I have the honor to enclose for  their Lordships information copies of Captain Bedingfelds report of his proceedings at the Nicobars (?) and of my letters to the Viceroy enclosing similar copies.
I dislike the idea of blockading these Islands not only for the reason I have given to His Excellency but also because it will be --- to our Country traders, and because being necessarily conducted by a perfectly inadequate force, it may entail unpleasant discussion with European powers on the ---- of any of their vessels being warned of.
This objection being of a political nature must of course have occurred to His Excellency in Council, and I have therefore refrained as yet from putting it forward, I shall however do so if the scheme is persevered in.
3.  I have directed Captain Bedingfeld to return to Trincomalee pending the Viceroys decision I shall then be able to discuss this matter with him ---voce, and also to obtain from him the details of his exper---- in connection with the suppression of the Slave Trade on the East Coast of Africa, whilst he will be equally ready to carry out the Viceroy’s wishes as if he were at Penang.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
          _________________________________________________
Enclosures
No.1 Capt. Bedingfelds report of proceedings at the Nicobar Islands.
No.2 Commodore Heath’s letter to the Viceroy.


No.11
1 Enclosure
Forwarded 7 Aug 1st with reference to my letter No.10 of the 6th --- This letter was sent this day from Capt Bedingfeld & I have approved of his proceedings

“Wasp” Reporting further proceedings with reference to the piracies committed at the Nicobar Islands
Sd  N.B.Bedingfeld
Captain

Dated at Sea the 14th day of July 1867.

Actnd 18 Sept 67.M72
Reply 24 Dec.M165

Enclosure. Letter from H.St.G.Ord Governer Straits letter to Capt.Bedingfeld relative to the piracies at Nicobar.


No.13
4 Enclosures

Actnd 18 Sept.67.M72
H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
8th Augst 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you for the information of the L.C.A. that having been detained until this day waiting for a supply of Biscuit, I had intended proceeding on the 10th to Triomalee.
I have this day received their Lordships telegram of the 6th --- (Inst?) And remain here accordingly.
2. As Rear Admiral Hillyer forwards by the mail the Disposition, state and conditions of N.M.—on this station, up to the date of his suprecession (?) I have nothing further to report excepting that H.M.S. “Star” anchored at Point-de-falle on the 1st Inst on route to the South East Coast and that the “Wasp” was on July 19 still employed at the Nicabars, as shewn in my letter No.11 of the 7th Augt .
3.  _______ I forward the Enclosures as enumerated (?) in the accompanying schedule.

Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.

Enclosures
No.1 Acknowledgment of Orders & Letters Received
No.2 Appointment of Officers.
No.3 Return of ---- conveyed. “Wasp”
No.4 Application from  --- of “Vigilant” to be repaid travelling expenses.


No.14
Actnd 18 Sept.67.M72
Reply 4 Oct MM96

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
13th August 1867

Sir,
I find on reference to the Addenda to the Painted Instructions, page 45 Art 163 & to Circular No.25 M M of the 5th August 1865 that whilst serving as additional Captain of H.M.Ship Excellent for--- on the Ordinance Select Committee at Woolwich, I omitted to apply for the full allowances to which I was entitled for lodgings and subsistence
2.  It appears that under Memo No.14 M M 26th May 1862 I was entitled to receive my travelling expenses from Dorking (my place of residence) to Woolwich, and also subsistence allowance when absent 12 hours at a time for each day of  my attending, that is to say, for 3 days in each week from the date of my appointment ( 1 May 1863) until the date of Circular No.25 M.M. 5 Augt 1865 deducting however the maximum of ---leave in each year and that from that date take my discharge viz 1st June 1867, I was entitled to my travelling expenses and to 20/s for the first 30 days and 15/s per day for every for every subsequent day (subject to the same deduction for leave)
3.  I have not the materials at hand for stating what amount of travelling expenses I have actually claimed and received and which would have to be deducted from the gross amount I now claim, and I have therefore to request that the account may be balanced in office, and that the sum due to me may be paid to my account at Ins---Bosenquet --- 73 Lombard Street.

Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore 

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.15

Actnd  18 Sept:67.W.72

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
17 August 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to forward herewith the periodical returns of H.M.S. “Octavia” to the ½ year ended 30th June. 1867.
2.  As these returns are rendered by my predecessor Rear Admiral Hellyer I have not considered it necessary to examine then in any way whatever.
3.  The Returns from the other ships of the Squadron will be forwarded as soon as they are all received, several have had to be returned for correction.
I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.16

Actnd 1.Oct.67.M.89

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
17 Augt.1867

Sir,
I bed to suggest a revision of the table at Page 135 of the Appendix to the Printed Instructions.
2.  The quarterly allowance of ammunition for practices with projectiles to the “Star” on & of the vessels under my Command is 34 rounds, of which after deducting those appropriated to double shot, shell to there remains 15 for  firing with single shot at a target, which will be increased to 17 as soon as the new pattern case (which will replace the present ---- case) has reached this station.
3.  If these rounds could be fairly distributed between all the guns Crew’s, the number would be ample for target practice, but under a strict interpretation of the existing regulations, the 68 – being, on board the “Star” the only smooth bore, fire the whole of its charges in an exceptional manner and even if the scale (?) for vessels carrying only revolving guns shd be adopted, for which however there is no authority, there will still remain for the 68—but 2 rounds with single shots.
4.  I would beg to suggest that a note  be added to the table in question giving power to Comng Officers to increase the quarterly allowance up to 5 rounds with single shot, for each guns crew in those cases where the exceptional charges have reduced them below that number.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.17
1 Enclosure

Actnd 1 Oct 67.M.89

H.M.S. “Octavia”
Bombay. 24 Augt 67

Sir,
I beg to forward for the consideration of the ---- Office a Pistol Pouch showing that the material of which it is glazed is unsuitable for hot climates.
The Pistol Holsters are glazed with the same material and are in the same condition.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.18
-Enclosures

Actnd 1 Oct.67.M.89

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
25 August 1867

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings No.13 dated the 8th Inst, I have the honor to inform you that considering the terms of their Lordships telegram of August 6th & in view of the probable dispatch from this port of an Expedition to Abyssinia, I have recalled the “Highflyer” from the Mozambique.
The “Wasp”, “Lyra”, “Vigilant” will be at Trincomalee in the course of the coming month, and this excepting the “Star”* and of the  (*ordered to Aden) Penguin, which I have left on the East Coast, the whole Squadron will be within (?) reach and ready to take part in the Expedition.
2.  I had as yet recd no requisition on the subject from the Bombay Government & I am informed by His Excellency the Governor, that up to this present moment he has no instructions from home as to the Royal Navy.
3.  Their L’ are aware that the Bombay Port have in their service a Superintendent of Marine and under him a large departmental staff. I understand that all the preparations for the expedition, so far as Naval transport is concerned are being made under that officers directions, & from him I learn that it is supposed to take up 80,000 tons of shipping one third to be steamers & the other remainder sailing vessels, that the manufacture of a large number of water---- has already been commissioned, and that the purchase of 3 steamers has been decided upon. An exploring force of about 300 men is held ready to start at short notice, but the heat at Massomabi (?) is at this season so intense, that its departure will probably be delayed until the end of September, and it  appears likely that the main body of the expedition will not leave before December.
4.  Col.Merriwether arrived from Aden on the 21st Inst.and is now at Doonah in consultation with the Governor. I understand he brings no fresh news from Abyssinia.
5.  In my communications with His Excellency the Governor of Bombay, on the subject,. I have assumed that I shall take the Navel Command of this expedition, & I would request their Lordships to put the----(promotion – commission ?) by telegraph, to divert temporarily the mail agents on this station from their present duties and to employ them a agents in transports. Given how many of the mail steamers have no Agents, in those ---ts the mail service appears to be equally well performed as in the others. There is moreover a clause in the mail contracts providing for the care of the mails in the ab---- -- Agent, & I trust therefore that the Portmaster General will make no objection to this proposal. Without some aid of this sort it will be impossible to keep up any order or organisation in so (20?) t--------- a body of vessels as will of necessity be gathered together on this occasion.
7.  I attach for their Lordships information, a map and memorandum on Abyssinia by the Quarter Master General of the Bombay A-----(Army ?). Having been sent to me confidentially I request it may be similarly considered by their Lordships.
8.  I forward the Enclosures as enumerated in the accompanying schedule.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

P.S. Their Ld telegram to recall the “Star” is received. –it be intended that she shd take soundings for the new line of telegraph. I hope that appropriate gear will be sent out to her.

Snd L.G.H.

Enclosures 8.
1. Appointment of  Officers
2. 2. Vacancies re – in Squadron
3. 3. Summery Returns of “Octavia” to 31st Dec.67.
4. Copy of Passing Ast of Ms-.Ramsay for Clerk (intermediate)
5. So  - so so H.A.G. ----min so so
6. Port---- so   so   so G.E.---- A--- Engr 1cl
7. Acknowledgement of Orders & Letter received.
8. Memorandum of Abyssinia with map (confidential)


No.19

Actnd 3 Oct”67.M.93

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
1st Sept 1867
Sir,
The Supernumeray Marines who have arrived in H.M.S.P.S. “Euphrates” are armed with the Linder Rifle for which there is as yet no ammunition on this station except that on board “Euphrates” for the use of her won Marine.
2.  None of the ships under my command are fitted with extra magazines for storage of linder ammunition, and I beg to suggest that Supernumeraries should for the present be sent out with the old Enfield.

Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.20
2 enclosures

Actnd 8 Oct.67.M.92

H.M.Ship Octavia. Bombay
2nd Septr.1867.

Sir,
In continuation of my letter of proceedings No.18 dated the 25th Augt I have the honor to report that I received their Lordship’s telegram directing me to call for 2 ships from the China Station on the 25th ---(Inst ?) v I trust their Lordships will approve of my having under the circumstances of the case addressed the letter of which I enclose a copy to Capt Edi—of H.M.S. “Latt---“ Senior Officer in the Straits.
2.  In forwarding their Lordships telegram to the Senior Officer at Hong Kong I stated what I had done and suggested either the “----nture” Troop ship or a paddle (?) box steamer with paddle box boats, for the 2nd ---
3.  I have had an interview with his Excellency the Governor and also  with the Commander in Chief and discussed the subject of the expedition generally, but I have nothing of interest to add to that which I reported to their Lordships in their last letter. A----- Bay is now proposed as the landing place.
4.  I have placed in writing before His  Excellency the Govenor my news as to the management of the sea transport, the general principle which I have recommended in that the Superintendent of Marine should manage everything at Bombay, & that I should undertake all subsequent control over the vessels of the Indian Government as well as the hired transports and direct their proceedings in accordance with requisitions I might receive from the General Commanding in Chief.
5.  Anticipating that their Lordships will approve of any step I may take, which lend to shew the readiness of the Navy and their willingness to take their share in any danger or difficulties which may occur in an expedition of so – a nature, I have offered to the Bombay Govt to form, should they wish it a Rocket Brigade of seamen. I am aware that there are officers of high position who deprecate the formation of Naval Brigades on shore as tending to Co--- (corode ?) the rigour of Naval discipline, the practice is however an old one, & in more recent days the Navy has gained in general repute by its conduct on shore in the trenches of Sebastopol & on the fields of India. I have offered only a 100 msn,, so that the ships will remain perfectly efficient, whilst if the Brigade should be engaged with the enemy the distinctness of --- (Lts ?) will tend to make its services conspicuous notwithstanding the smallness of its numbers.
6.  I sail this day for  Muscat under a requisition from the Viceroy as I have already informed their Lordships by telegraph.
7.  The political status at Muscat is very confused but I will endeavour to place it shortly before their Lordships. The reigning Sultan, Synd Selim ?murdered his father in the early part of 1866 & then attained possession of the throne of Muscat , He at the same time informed Synd Toorkee--- ?
The Indian fort at first refused to recognise Synd Selim, but did so in Sep 1st 1866 and they also obtained the release of Synd Toorkee.
From that time to this Toorkee has been organising land expeditions against Selim & the Resident now writes to say that he fears he will capture Muscat and dethrone his nephew unless checked by British influence.
The Resident has permission to endeavour to negotiate between the parties & to threaten (?) Toorkee with the bombardment of Muscat and the non-recognition of himself as Sultan if he should proceed to a successful attack on his nephew.
8  I believe it would be a great mistake to carry out this threat for the bombardment of the town would be the ruin of so many British subjects residing in it and the destruction of the Ports would render the tenure of the throne more uncertain ----- whilst our main object is to establish a stable government.
9 .  I do not intend to be a party to any bombardment but hope my presence and that of the “Octavia” will be of material help to Col. Pelly in effecting a peaceable arrangement between the parties.
10  Being anxious to anticipate the wants of the Indian Government, and finding the ordinary mode of  communication via Seychelles very uncertain, I have ordered (dispatched) the Lyra from Trincomalee to order up the “Highflyer” & “Vigilant” to this port & the “Star” to Aden.
11.  H.M.Indian Troop Ship “Euphrates” arrived on the 26th Augt 1867.
12.  I have no further information respecting the proceedings of the “Wasp” at the Nicobar Islands.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of  the Admiralty.

Enclosure No.1 Letter from Commodore to Capt Edye H.M.S. “Satellite”
Enclosure No.2 Acknowledgement of Orders.


No.21

Actnd 1 Nov.67.M.114
Reply 23 Oct.67.L.104

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
2nd September 1867

Sir,
I have to request their Lordships instructions (?) on the following points, with reference to the Naval Discipline Act 1866.1st, Under Section 53 the Admiralty have power to suspend (exception are of sentence to death) amend, modify (in the sense of reducing) the punishment awarded to a prisoner by a Court Martial. Does this not imply that any (?) sentence should be Submitted to their Lordships before being carried out?
2nd  Supposing the above question to be assumed in the negative. Has the Commander in Chief power to suspend, annul modify (in the sense of reducing) the punishment awarded to a prisoner by a Court Martial.
3rd  Can I as Senior of H.M.Ships & vessels in the Indian Ocean legally exercise the power given (?) to a Commander in Chief by the Act of Parliament in Question.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore


No.22
2 Enclosures

Act 2nd 1 Nov.67.M.114

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
19 Sept.1867
Sir,
I have to report for the consideration of the War Office some defects which after a two years trial on board this ship have been observed in the 66 T.M.L. Gun Carriages.
2.-  The Carriages are of the pattern tried & approved on board H.MS. “Excellent” & sealed SS 1048 new Series War Office Circulars.
1st  The Extra piece brought on to the rear axelture is in many cases split as shewn in sketch 1.
2nd  The hole – not being lined has much enlarged and allows great play to the collar of the elevating Screw hence when the recoil is suddenly checked by the breeching, the head of the screw flies from under the breech causing considerable delay before the next round can be fired.
3.  When the depression shock is used and the gun is fired with 8lb charge and all the depression the port will admit of (about 6 -) the chock & screw are invariably thrown completely to the rear and the gun comes down to the housing position.
4.  I bed to suggest as remedies by (drg ?)
1sr that D sketches I & KK should receive a brass lining fitting the Screw Collar, and long enough (as to Sketch I() to reach well down into the true axelture. This would I think remove defects 1 & 2.
2nd That the pin G should be lengthened so as to pass almost through the depression chock, and should be placed nearer to the bracket than at present, so that it may not prevent ------- elevation. The hole in the chock to receive it must be placed excentrically, as shewn in the sketch II so that the gun may have all the elevation the port will admit of without removing the chock.
5.  The fixed stop : Sketch I should be raised to height of 4 ½ inches.
6.  I take this opportunity of stating that there seems no doubt that the shot are occasionally stopped at the locking grooves, the retention of these grooves having however been determined on, after a full discussion by the O.S. Committee, there is I suppose no use in reopening the question.
7.  ----ment wads should be used when firing with motion.

Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

Storekeeper General

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
23rd Sept 1867

Sir,
Referring to my letter of --- the 2nd Augt last with reference to the articles of Cabin Furniture transferred from Rear Admiral Hillyar to myself I have the honor to inform you that in consequence of the condition of  the articles having been omitted to be shewn on the --- Report of Survey in accordance with Par 5 of their Lordships Circular S.No.5 of the 22nd --- 1866 I directed the surveying officers to make – fresh copies and add the condition of the several articles thereon, two of which I enclose. As the survey was held by order of Rear Admiral Hillyar I have not approved the copies I now forward, but have attached a receipt thereto.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

No.23
Enclosure 4

Actnd 1 Nov.67.M.114
Reply 22 Oct.67.M.102

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
29th Sept.1867

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings No.20 dated Sept 2nd 67 I have the honor to state that I left Bombay on Sept 2nd and arrived at Muscat on the 9th.
Synd Toorkee was in possession of the suburb of Muttrah and it appeared that after some skirmishes with slight lose on both sides, he had gained possession of the principal well from which Muscat is supplied so that but for English interference he would most probably have ousted Synd Salim from the throne. Col.Pelly the Resident had arrived the same morning and I attach a copy of the agreement which under our advice and after some negotiation was signed by their Highnesses Synd Salim the reigning Sultan and Synd Toorkee his uncle.
In accordance with the terms of that document Synd Toorkee embarked on board H.M.S. “Octavia” and his commenced their homeward march and Selim being free from all fear on their account, I sailed on the 11th and reached this Port on the 17th Instant.
I am glad to inform your Lordships that this business has been settled without the firing of a shot from H.M.S. under my command.
His Excellency the Governor has appointed Dr. Lenard (?) late consultant Zanzibar to advise Synd Toorkee as to the choice of a house etc etc and His Highness having landed on the 26th Instant is no longer in my charge.
I have received very detailed reports from Capt Bedingfeld of his proceedings at the Nicobars.
They may be summed up as following.
The “Wasp” Capt “Bedingfeld” and “Satellite” Captain Edge (Edye ?) with 50 Sepoys under Major Pringle left Penang July 19th 1867 and arrived off Great Nicobar on the 22nd. The ships anchored off the Village belonging to Buttai (?) the murderer of the crew of the crew of the “Tutteh Islam” the village was burnt, the conoes detroyed and the pigs and poultry killed.
The expedition then proceeded to Naurang (?) where they succeeded in rescueing one little half caste girl who has been taken charge of by the Singapore Government. The canoes and huts in that neighbourhood were burnt and the live stock killed. The cocoanut trees were (in accordance with the Viceroys wishes) left untouched.
Captain Bedingfeld reports that he received the greatest assistance from Captain Edge (Edye ?) and Major Pringle and that the officers and boats crews carried out the duties entrusted to them with exemplary zeal, although the violence and continuance of the rain exceeded all that Captain Bedingfeld had ever witnessed.
I am glad to inform their Lordships that the exposure to which those concerned were subjected has not been followed by any increase of the Sick Lists.
1st. I attach a list of the European foods to be found in the huts destroyed.
2ndly. Summary of the number of huts and canoes destroyed.
3rdly. Copies of the proclamations nailed to trees at Great Nicobar and Nancaury by order of Capt.Bedingfeld.
4thly  Copy of letter from the Governor of the Straits Settlements approving the conduct of Capt. Bedingfeld in which approval I have myself concurred (concerned ?).
 The “Wasp” reached “Penang” on the 13th August in the midst of the serious bid between two sects of Chinese inhabitants of the colony of which their Lordships will have heard Captain Bedingfeld at the request of the Governor landed his field piece and small arm men and remained until he was assured all danger was passed.
 The “Wasp” is now at Madras completing provisions she will bring up from Trincomalee stores for “Octavia” and ships expected here and then sail for England in accordance with their Lordships telegram.
 The preparations for the Abyssinan Expedition are being pushed on by the Bombay Government with great energy.
 The Exploring Expedition sailed on the 16th and will be followed by the Advance force of 2000 men about the 6th October. The main body under Sir Robert Napier will remain here until the advanced force has pushed on sufficiently and established depots with roads of access in the mountain plateau.
 I do not think they will leave before December at the earliest. I have directed the “Star” to join the exploring (Party) Expedition so that Col.Merewether may have the benefit of Commander Bradshaws opinion before finally determining upon the Port of debarkation.
 I shall dispatch the Satellite as Senior Officers with the advanced expedition giving her Captain full instructions so that methodical arrangements may be made and carried out from the very beginning.
 I can hardly say with any certainty whether I shall myself proceed to the Red Sea before the main Expedition but as far as I see at the present I shall be more useful here.
 I attach a letter written to me by desire of His Excellency the Governor embodying in their integrity the proposals I made to him in the letter (quoted) of August 29th and referred to in my last report of proceedings.
 The appointment of Capt.Tryon (?) was not known at the time the letter was written.
 I observe that he is placed under my orders but until I see his instructions I am unable to say how far the arrangement made between myself and the Governor will have to be modified.
 I will send all necessary fees for mooring beacons --- to “Star” by the “Satellite”

Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.24
4 Enclosures

Actnd 1 Nov.67.M.114

H.M.S. “Octavia” Bombay
29th Sept 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to  forward for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty the several preriodical Returns as enumerated on the other side hereof and
Have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

1. Abstract State of Condition
2. Disposition of Squadron
3. Appointments of Officers
4. Return of Short of Complement & Supernumerary of Squadron


No.25
Actnd 1 Nov.67.M.114
Reply.25 Oct.67.S.106

H.M.S. Octavia Bombay
29th Sept 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to submit for the consideration of their Lordships that the frequent  presence of dry rot in the stern frame of comparatively new ships is double is due to the constant thumping and flopping of the Counter (?) on to the water ---(line ?) when at anchor, and that it might be remedied by coppering up round the stern and quarters as high as the lower port sill. In the mean time very stringent orders might be given that ships not so coppered should be ca-----ed round the counters within 6 months of arriving in a Foreign station and at more frequent intervals afterwards than is now the practice.

I have etc
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.37
14th October 1867
Submitted

Forwarded from Bombay par P&O Steamer “Rangoon”
14 October 1867

Actnd 14 Nov.67.M.131
Reply 11 Nov.67.B.128

“Octavia” Bombay
14th October 1867

Application for an allowance to Mr.Pounds as ---- (Nav- ?) Lieutenant of a Flag ship.


No.38
14th October 1867
Submitted

Forwarded from Bombay per “Rangoon” 14th October 1867

Actnd 14 Nov.67.M.151
Reply.11.Nov.67.P.128

“Octavia” Bombay
14th October 1867

Application for an allowance to Mr.Bulleren (Butler ?) as Paymaster for a Flag Ship.


Storekeeper General

Received.12th Dec.1867

H.M.Ship Octavia
Bombay
11th October 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to request that you will forward to me as early as possible the  forms demanded on the other side hereof, very few being on board and these mostly of an obsolete form.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Somerset House
                              -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Copy of Journal of the proceedings of the Squadron ……   1 Ream
Abstract state and condition (new) …….     ½ Ream
Return of man and boys required to complete squadron (long form) …   ½ Ream
Returns of Officers Promoted Appointed, etc…..    ½ Ream
Acknowledgement of order and letters received ……    1 Ream
Reports of the inspection and preparation for Battle of H.M.Ships (latest from) ½ Ream
 

No.39
2 Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per “Rangoon” 14th October 67

Reporting Proceedings

Actnd 14 Nov.67.M.131

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Bombay 14th October 67

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings No.23 of the 29th September I have the honor to inform you that with the exception of the arrival of H.M.S. “Satellite” from Singapore on the 3rd and her departure on the 11th October in charge of the advanced Abyssinian Force, there has been no naval cahnge at this port.
2  The Advanced Forces consists of 2700 more, all Natives, with 900 mules and cavalry horses they sailed in the early part of the month in five sailing Transports towed by five Steamers. They will coal and water at Aden and proceed thence to the port which Colonel Merrewether and the Committee over which he presides may have selected as the landing place for the expeditionary forces. The duty of the Advanced Force will be to guard the mules, cattle and Horses which may arrive. A similar force will proceed at the end of the month, it will take up a position on the hills and the main body will remain at Bombay until six months provision are reported to be stored well to the front.
3.The preparations for the Expedition are going on satisfactorily. Transport Animals are being gathered in different places and as the N.E.Monsoon has new fairly set in they, as well as the Troops and Stores from this quarter will be independent of steam transport, at least as far as Aden. Arrangements have been made for towing between that port and the port of debarkation.
4.. The transport from Suez will be conducted by 3 large ---- Steamer towing native buggalows (?) with stores, and as the distance to the port of debarkation will probably be but little over 1000 mules, they will make frequent trips backwards and forwards. This service will be closely watched and an additional steamer put on if necessary.
5. By using such vessels as are available at Suez and in the Persian Gulf we not only obtain a larger supply of  Transport than if Bombay shipping only were taken up, but we are also able to keep freight down at this port to reasonable rates.
6  The Island of Gibbet Jees (?) in the Red Sea (Sea) has been selected as the sport at which dispatch steamers from the Abyssinian Coast shall intercept the mails. The dispatch steamer will hoist her Ensign at the main by day and 1 Vertient (?) light at nigh, and she will also  burn a blue light at intervals of 20 to 30 minutes according to the state of the weather. The arrangement however will not come into play until His Excellency the Governor  has communicated with the Home Government on the subject so soon as it is quite settled I will telegraph to their Lordships.
7.  Captains Tryon with a portion of his staff arrived on the 10th. He has been to Poona to make the acquaintance of the Governor, the Commander in Chief of the Army and of the Commissary General, and in a few days he will commence his duties, there is some little difficulty in arranging what shall be their exact limits as the responsibility for the conduct of the Expedition resting with the Bombay Government they have worked up to this point so far as their means allow them with their own officers.
8.  I have been requested by the Bombay Government to exercise a certain control over the marine expenditure connected with this expedition. I have complied with the request and I believe the measure will promote economy.
9.  My offer to supply a rocket brigade has been accepted with thanks but the original telegraphic request for the Governor for rockets has been but very slightly responded to and I have requested a further supply to be asked for of 1800 12 Pds Hales’ rockets packed for mule carriage in boxed containers 5 each and for 12 tubes.
10- Neither the “Highflyer, Vigilant or Lyra” have yet arrived, nor have I information of the “Star” having reached Aden. There is no regular mail communication between the Sychelles and the East Coast and it appears probably that the Vessels must have dispersed for the season in search of slavers before the “Lyra”.


Page 48

Relating to the fate of  Dr.Livingston
Enclosure – 10

H.M.Ship “Lyre””
12 November 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you than when at Zanzibar on the 11th October last, I heard a report that Dr.Livingstone had been seen alive in the neighbourhood of the spot where he was supposed to have been killed. Dr.Kirk the Vic Consul at Zanzibar who was  (sic [with ?]) Dr.Livingstone during his expedition to the Zambezie in 1864 and is well acquainted with that part of the Country, overheard in course of conversation with some natives of  Zanzibar that a party of Arabs had just arrived from the south and had seen a white man in the interior and after a long cross-examination of these men he felt satisfied that there was a great probability of Dr.Livingstone being still in  existence. Some Photographs having been shewn to them including one of Livingstone, they picked his out being the one most like the white man they had seen. Dr.Kirk further gained from them that the white man in question had given some letters to another party of Arabs who were expected to reach Zanzibar on or about the 25th October.

I have etc
(Signed) Robert A.Parr
Commander

Commodore
L.G.Heath. C.B.
H.M.S. “Octavia”
Page 54

No.714

Forwarded from Bombay per “Camadie” 29th Nov. 67

Actd 28 Jany 1868.M

Reporting Proceedings in Abyssinia
H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Bombay 29th November 1867

Sir,
I attach hereto for their Lordships information a printed copy of  Colonel Merewether’s latest report, also copy of a Telegram received from him, and an extract from the Bombay Times, I have seen Colonel Phayer’s (?) report to Sir Robt Napier which is to thje same effect as that from Colonel Merewether.
2- Captain Edye is, I am sorry to say laid up with a severe attack of fever, he appears to have been most energetic in imposing the means for supplying the water to the shore, of which he lands daily upwards of 50 tons. He has rigged up a planks hooks by means of which it is run into Tanks on the beach instead of being rolled in cask’s a distance of upwards of 200 yards as was ---- the practice. He complains much of the native labourers and has been obliged to resort to stringent ------ to keep them at work  they have undertaken to perform upon one occasion the whole of the boats employed in bringing over stone for the full struck work (??).  he sent a Lieutenant with 30 men to take charge of the boats and the natives have since done their work regularly.
3.  Three pile Piers each 700 feet long are now on their way across, they will be fixed by the Engineers and fitted with cranes and ---nways.
4 The railroad to reach to Koomaylee is in course of shipment, and the “Simiramis” a large hulk which ahs been fitting for a very long time in the Dock yard will through the personal interference of His Excellency the Governor be ready as a condensing ship within 10 days and will be towed over by the “Daphne”.
5.   The -------- (Scinde ?) Brigade has sailed and the Commander in Chief who will cross in the “Octavia” speaks of the middle of December as the date of his starting.
6.  The “Vigilant” and the “Star” are by this time with Captain Edye and the “Argus” should be with him in a few days.
7. The Egyptians Frigate “Ibrahamite” 26 Guns with His  Excellency Abdh Kades Pasha and Suite accompanied by the Corvetter “Touri” (?) 4 Guns arrived at Zoolla on the 15th instant from M---- they came by orders from the Viceroy to exchange civilities with the English authorities. They were to have left Zoolla on the 17th Instant but were expected to return in a few days.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of  the Admiralty
Whitehall

No.75

Forwarded from Bombay per “Casnalic” (?) 29th Nov.1867

Proceedings of Transport Services

Actd 28 January 1868.k

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Bombay 29th November 67

Sir,
In accordance with their Lordships telegraphic instructions a ship the Zenobia has been selected for  Captain Tryon and his staff . She has well ventilated cabins and will be used as a store ship.
2.  The arrangements under which Captain Tryon was placed in communication with the Superintendent of Marine is working well and Captain Tryon although without official executive power does much good by by his advice and helps much to push forward the work in the Transport Department.
3.  I attach a printed copy of correspondence between Captain Tryon and the Superintendent of Marine on the subject of assimilation of charter parties with the Solicitors report and Government resolutions thereon.
4  Under the Secretary off States letter to the Governor of Bombay dated September 3rd a wish is indicated that Captain Tryhon should remain here until the steamer chartered in England shall have arrived and as this is undoubtedly the place at which for the present he is most useful he will probably remain.


Page 76

I have the honor to forward herewith the Reports of Survey held this day on an officer and 2 seamen invalided from the Squadron under my orders.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.


No.112

Posted at Aden, 31st December 1867

Defects in working in the 7in.6½ tone Rifle Gun.

Actnd 25 Jany 1868.M.55

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Bombay, 21st December 1867

Sir,
On my recent inspection of H.M.Ship “Daphne” I observed the following defects in the arrangements  for working the two 6½ tone 7in Rifled guns.
1.When all the guns were transferred to one side, the keel of the ship being about 4½’ if was impossible to run the guns in with their own crew, and it was most laborious work even with both crews united.
2nd . The transporting of the guns from one broadside to the other was a work of the utmost difficulty and it was 21 ½ minutes before the operation was completed.
3rd ____The canvas bearers appeared inappropriate for upper deck guns as the shot have to be lifted by hand to the muzzle, and frequently slip out of the bearer.
--------It may be said with respect to the first mentioned defect that it is apparent only when exercising without powder, and that it vanishes altogether in action since the recoil of the Gun will then be sufficient to bring it in far enough for loading. This is perfectly ----- (held, done ?), but as the routine of a Man of War requires a very large amount of Gunnery exercise without powder it is essential to make the most reasonable light to the Guns Crew, and I most strongly recommend the adoption of ----colts in other powerful running in gear.
 With respect to the second objection which is a very serious one, I beg to re------ a suggestion I have before made to their Lordships that in the case of all revolving guns there should be a central pivot. No alteration need be made in the present slides or rear flaps, but there should be provided in addition detached flap long enough to reach from the rear of the slide to the central bolt. This flap should fit the hinge of the ordinary flap and be substituted for it when the gun is to be shifted over. The gun could then be swung round from one side to the other without a check except that necessary for shifting haversing tackles and thus the zigzag crab like operations incidental to the present system would be avoided.
 With respect to the third defect I am that canvas bearers were adopted after long trial by the officers of the “Excellent” and that the trial was extended to the gun worked as an upper deck gun in the Gun Boat, but still it is an undoubted fact that the shot do frequently slip out of  the bearers in the “Daphne” and I would suggest the consideration and trial for upper deck guns of a metal bearer similar to that shewn in the margin the peculiarity intended to represented is that the length of the bearer should be less than that between the studs, so that the studs would present the shot slipping out, and so that could be at once entered into the bore without the preliminary aid required from the ---ammer when the old  pattern is on iron bearer was tried.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.

No.113
Enclosures

Posted at Aden, 31st December 1867

Defective State of the boilers of H.M.S. “Highflyer”

Actd 25 Janyy 1868.M.55
Reply 20 Jany 1868.M.42

H.M.S. “Octavia”
Bombay. 21st December 1867

Sir,
I have the honor to forward for their Lordships..(end of page)

Page 83

No.1

Forwarded form Anesley Bay per “Gen” Havelock 4 Jan ..

Reporting arrival at Anesley Bay

Actd 25 Jany 1868.M.65
Reply 2 Jany 1868 M.43

H.M.S. “Octavia”
Anesley Bay 3rd January 1868.
Sir,
I have the honor to report my arrival this day in the harbor after a favorable passage from Aden during which I had the  pleasure to observe and benefit by 3 good lights placed, the first on the 7 fin patch off Ras Shuckles (?) the second on the Island of Adjure (?) the third on East arasta (?) Island.
2 Commander Bradshaw deserves the greater credit for the hard working energy which he has displayed in lighting the approaches to Anesley Bay. In the case of the two shore lights foundations had to be dug and even lime burnt for concrete, heavy spars had to be dragged on shore and erected with great labor and considering the smallness of his Ship’s Company I am quite surprised at the shortness of time taken. His first light was  taken in hand at the end of November 1867 and the last was lighted on the 2nd January 1868.
3. I have this afternoon paid a short visit to shore and am equally astonished at the amount of good work which has there been done. The Pier is really a remarkable structure considering that every stone was brought a distance of 10 to 12 miles and that it was finished within about two months of its commencement. It extends about 300 yards into the sea and is about 20 feet wide. Besides the pier, a pile pier made at Bombay is in a forward state and a separate stone pedestal pier has been built in deep water for the purpose of sustaining a receiving tank for condensed water. From this tank the water is  sent to the reserve on shore by means of an iron pipe. One of the Normandys condensers has been set up on this pedestal pier by the Engineers of the “Satellite” and the other at the end of the stone pier by those (page 84) of the “Argus”. The total water landed per day is now 160 tons.
4. The land transport appears now to be in a serviceable state and I understand that since the arrival of Major  General Sir Charles Stavely (?), the general arrangements on those have been much improved in every direction.
Captain Edye the Officers and crew of H.M.Ship “Satellite” appear to have rendered most valuable service to the expedition and all the arrangements made by Captain Edye appear to me to have been most judicious.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.

No.2

Forwarded from Anesley Bay per “Gen” Havelock” 4 Jan 68

Supply of Coals for Abyssinian Expedition

Actd 25 Jany 1868.M.55

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Anesley Bay. 4th January 1868

Sir,
With reference to my letter of  the 11th Dec 67 N.98 recommending a monthly shipment of 9000 tons of coals to Aden and 8000 tons to Bombay, I have the honor to state that the Superintendent of the P& O Company at Aden informed me on the 21st December 1867 that he had then
in stock and discharging …..  12156 tones
Expected to arrive in  January……….. 4696 -.-
------------------  February 5199 -.-
------------------  March  8933 -.-
------------------  April  11008 -.-
His total expenditure in November   7315 -.-
------------------  December 8285 -.-
And as 5000 tons were taken up at Bombay for the Red Sea on the 21st December the present supply may be considered sufficient.
 I have authorised the Superintendent to purchase 3 cargoes expected in the market for delivery at Zoola and if their Lordships comply with my request for the monthly supply asked for in my former letter I think there will be no cause for  anxiety in this head

(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The  Secretary
Of the Admiralty


Page 101

(cont. from previous page) …it was safely landed last week by a party from H.M.S. “Octavia” under the directions of Navy Lieutt Poundos ? it is intended to attempt to work it to a certain extent with saltwater.
3. The demands upon the Navy for fresh water are increasing but arrangements for its more methodical issue are nearly completed and I hope a considerable saving will then be effected. The population of Zoulla now amounts to upwards of 9000 men and about 3000 animals. I trust my demands for condensers will be complied with and as it will be dangerous to rely upon the presence of the squadron for their working I have requested a supply of Native Engineers and stokers from the Bombay Government.
4.- With 7 large new barges, 4 –ugs, 3 steam launches and 160 native boats the landing of stores will always be at a satisfactory rate but the second pier is not advancing very fast and its want is much felt. It will will (sic) henceforward be taken in hand by the “Octavia” and thus a certain amount of skilled labour will be set free for the railroad.
5.- Notwithstanding all that can be done the rapidity of our advance must I think depend upon the amount of assistance in forage and land Transport which can be obtained from Tigre. A messenger from Prince Kassa has been received by the Commander in Chief and an officer is about to return the visit and I hope he will be able to obtain in the way of bargain that which is in my opinion absolutely necessary to obtain in some way or the other , if the campaign is to proceed in the manner at present determined on .
6.-  A portion of the ---afe force is about to push on immediately to Addigraht.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.

P.S. The Commander in Chief leaves for the Straits on the  21st Instant but not necessarily to remain.
 

Page 102

No.29
9 Enclosures

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Tilly” 20th Jany llll

Reporting Proceedings

Actnd 12 Feby 1868.N.75 M

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Ansley Bay 19th January 1868

Sir,

In continuation of my report of Proceedings No.118 of the 31st December 1867 and the letter No.1 of the 3rd January 1868 reporting my arrival at the port I have the honor to state that HMS “Daphne” arrived with the condensing Ship “Simiramis” (?) on the 2nd January.
2. The “Dryad” with a tug and three barges arrived on the 8th.
3. On the 7th Lieutenant Warrington having invalided I dispatched the “Vigilant” under the command of Lieutt Bainbridge and having on board as pilots the officers named in the margin to an anchorage near the light ---------- on the 7 four patch (??). On the 11th the “Vigilant” returned having been sent by Commander Bradshaw to obtain assistance for the transport “Burmah” which had run on shore off Ras Shacklis and which was laden with sailing plant, ------- Engines and other things most indispensable to the service of the expedition. I immediately sent off the “Satellite”, the “Vigilant” and the large lighter which we (was ?) (re soon as the tug could be coaled) followed by the “Alexandra” ( a powerful Bengal tug) leaving an empty transport. Through the the (sic) exertions of all concerned the Burmah was floated and has arrived in tow of the “Satellite”.
4.On the 9th the “Argus” and “Daphne” each with an empty camel shipin tow left for Barbera.
5. The “Daphne” returned on the 16th with a broken (eccentric ?).
6. The “Argus” will proceed to the Suez as Senior officers as soon as she returned from Barbera.
7. HMS “Spiteful” has arrived at Bombay she met with bad weather off the Mauritius, but I have not as yet received any (page 103) detailed report.
8. Commander Brown has rejoined his ship and Commander Maxwell joined the “Octavia” on the 17th, but 31 days after the invaliding of his predecessor at Bombay.
9. I attach a copy of one of Sir Robert Napier’s orders in which the exertions of the Navy are acknowledged. A copy of the Harbour Regulations and a copy of a Notice to Mariners which has been extensively circulated, also a statement of the quantity of water landed during last week for the use of the camp, which now contains about 9000 men and 3000 animals.
10. His Excellency Abdle Kader Pasha gave on the 13th a grand entertainment to the officers of the Navy and Army he sailed in the Egyptian Frigate “Shatumite” (?) 26 Guns for Massawali (?) on the following day.
11. The French Avise “Diamant” has this day for Aden touching at Edd.
12. The health of the squadron remains good notwithstanding a great amount of exposure to the sun in giving the necessary assistance to Captain Tryon (2) and the Commander in Chief (1).

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall
  ______________________________________________
7 Jan.  General memo from Sir R.Napier relative to  the services of the Navy & Army
6—do—  Notice to Mariners
18—do— Report of Water landed.
17—do— Acknowledgment of  orders and letter received.
18 Dec 67  Inspection of the Ship Highflyer
31 –do— Incidental expenses paid by Paymaster of “Daphne”
30 Nov 67  Passing Certificate of Mr.Foster (?) for Act Chief Engineer.
11 Jan 68  ..        ..        .. Mr Webb for Engineer
30 Nov 67 ..        ..        .. Mr Scott for  1st  el Asst Engineer

 Page 112
 
Notices of Lights and Beacons created in the approaches to Annesley Bay by Commander R.Bradshaw of HMS “Star” with copies of the notices that have been issued in consequence.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall

No.53
2 Enclosures

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “General Havelock” 4thh Feby 1868

Reporting Proceedings in Abyssinia

Actd 26 Feby 1868 –93M
Reply 21 Feby 1868 – 91M

HMShip “Octavia”
Ansley Bay, 3rd February 1868

Sir,

Since my last letter on the subject No.28 of the 19th January 1868, much progress has been made in what is as yet the one great difficulty of this expedition, viz. The forwarding stores and provisions to the Front.
2. The road to Senafi is now practicable for carts although there is still one place where manual  labour has to be applied to aid the animals in drawing them up.
3. Addigraht is occupied and the road from Senafi to that  port is being worked at.
4. Land  transport animals are still arriving in large numbers, and the total already imported is 12,000 mules or ponies, 1400 Bullocks, 40 Elephants, besides upwards of 3000 Camels of which no regular account has been kept.
5. The supply of water for Toula has caused me great anxiety for the demands upon us have increased very rapidly. The average quantity landed daily is now about 200 tons and the numbers dependent upon us are 13,000 human beings and 4000 animals besides 2 locomotive Engines, which cannot as those in charge at first supposed be worked with Salt water. It is only to the happy reintroduction of the principle of surface condensation in some of the newly built Steamers that we owe the power of keeping up this large supply.
6. The distribution of water on shore is now conducted in a methodical manner, every man has 1 ½ Gallons and every animal as much as he can drink once a day, this I find the usual custom with  (page 113) mules and other  animals at Lahore and in other parts of India and it seems to answer here.
7. The Punjab P---- commanded by Major Chamberlain have recently discovered sweet water at a depth of 45 feet and so soon as this service of supply shall have been more developed it will afford us sensible relief. I am told thhat on the discovery of the water the poor Sh---s kissed the feet of the soldiers who had dug the well and almost worshipped those who had brought within their reach this to them, life giving treasure.
8.I have thought it right to obtain a floating reserve for use in emergencies and also to meet the ---- of transports in the event of a sudden re-embarkation of the Force. I have therefore directed Captain Tryon to place empty tanks capable of holding 800 or 900 tons on board a sailing transport which will be filled at Suez and I have directed a steam pump for her in Egypt to send a telegraphic demand for one to Malta to be forwarded if necessary to your Lordships.
9. The Naval Rocket Brigade have been  ordered forward.
10. Only 4 rocket machines have yet arrived and I have had to make substitutes for the remaining eight. It appears from the printed official return that they were shipped in the “Mendoza” whose cargo is said to have been all delivered here, but those machines cannot be found. It is a pity that they should have been sent in a ship, which carried no rocks (?) to whilst another ship the “Viatka” brought rockets but no rocket machines.
11. At the Urgent request of Sir Robert Napier I have allowed the Officers named in the margin to be temporarily attached to the Royal Engineers or Army works Corps in both of which services the want of Officers is very great.
12. I attach a return showing the number of a troops landed and their distribution also one shewing the quantity of provisions now at Senafe.

I have etc
Signed L.H.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.

 

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “General Havelock 4th Feby 1868

Actd 26 Feby 1868 N93M

Reporting Proceedings

H.M.Ship “Octavia” Annesly Bay
3rd February 1868

Sir,

In continuation of my report of proceedings No.29 of the 19th January 1868, I have the honor to state that finding the sick list of the “Satellite” was steadily creeping up and that it had reached 48 out of a complement of 275, I dispatched her on the 27th January with a transport in tow to Suez where Captain Edye will do the duties of Senior Officer until the arrival of the “August”. I have directed him to vary the diet of his crew as much as possible consistently with the regulations and to give his ships company rest and relaxation. The cases are principally slight but obstinate ulcers and diarrhea. I believe the presence of a man of War at Suez will tend much to advance the interests of the expedition, and I should have sent one sooner had one been disposable.
2. HMS “Star” returned on the 29th January for coal and to make good defects. Commander Bradshaw has been diligently at work and has collected much material but it is not yet in a state to be forwarded to the Hydrographer. He had laid down some buoys and Beacons in the approaches to this port. I attach a copy of the notice to Mariners which has in consequence been issued and I have forwarded a similar copy with the more detailed notices to the Hydrographer.
3. A report having been made to me of the misconduct of Mr.Graham, Assistant Surgeon of HMS “Penguin” I directed that on reaching Aden to exchange Commanders that Vessel should come on to this port. She arrived on the 1st Instant and an enquiry will be held this day.
4. The “Spiteful” arrived on the 2nd instant, having towed a ship full of Elephants from Bombay.
5. The “Hydra” arrived at Bombay on the 11th January and was still there when the “Spiteful” left on the 18th.
6. The “Argus” is doing good work at Berbera pushing on the embarkation of Animals. The animals…


Page 136

No.81
1 Enclosure.

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Dalhousie” 5th March 1868

Act 2nd 26 March No.132

Men landed as a Navel Rocket Brigade.

HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
5 March 1868

Sir,
In reply to your letter of the 14th …….. M.No.80, I have the honor to forward herewith a Nominal list of  the men with their ratings who have been landed for service in Abyssinia as a Naval Rocket Brigade.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the  Admiralty


No.82
7 Enclosures

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “Dalhousie” 5th March 1868

Actd 26 Mch No.132
Reply 13 April L.159

Forwarding Report of a Court of Enquiry

HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
5th March 1868

Sir,
In ----ing the enclosed report of a Court of Inquiry held to investigate the accusations made by Mr.Harding …..(gunner?) of the conduct of his Commander before  their Lordships. I beg you will call attention to the incompetency of this officer to drill the Ships Company.
I understand he joined the “Daphne” from HMS “Cambridge”. I attach the paper named in the schedule.

Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.83
9 Enclosures

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “Dalhousie” 5th March 1868
Actd 26Mch No.132

Letter of Proceedings.

HMS “Octavia” Annersley Bay
5th March 1868

Sir,
In continuation of my Report of Proceedings No.71 of the 19th February 1868, I have the honor to state that the “Spiteful” arrived from Berberah and Aden on the 23rd …..(Ellimo ?) and sailed again for Aden on the 26th in consequence of an urgent requisition from Sir Robert Napier  forwarded on a Telegram from Bombay to stop the entry into the Red Sea of the Transport “Challenger” conveying a portion of the 16th Bengal Cavalry from Calcutta.
2. The “Challenger” had already reached Aden and it appears there had been 4 deaths of Cholera before reaching Madras , that the troops were landed there for 17 days, that they embarked in pratique, called at Galli in pratique, landed at Aden in prateque, and are there encamped with the other troops. It is now more than 2 months since the last death nevertheless the consequences of our being placed in quarantine by Egypt would be so serious that although if the “Challenger” is infected, Madras , Galli, and Aden must be equally so yet under the advice of a Medical board that vessel  will be left at Aden for the present.
3. The “Penguin” sailed for the East Coast on 21st.
4. The “Vigilant” ---- been achieved by the “Star” arrived on the 28th her rudder head was completely gone and rotten, and it is extraordinary that it should have held on so long. It will be made good by the flag ship’s carpenters.
5. HMS “Nymph” arrived yesterday.
6. The “Argus” is still at Berberah where after a decisive fight between 2 tribes the whole t===ts asked Commander Hallowes to be there king and keep the general peace” I need hardly add that the Offer was declined.
7. The health of the Ships Companies remains good, but not quite so good as when I last wrote.
8. The quantity of coals in hand and discharging (?) at Aden on the 1st March was 9904 tons, and we have at this port 7000 but in view of a possible early re-embarkation I have directed Captain Edye to purchase at Suez about 3000 tons for which shipping has been sent to him.
9. The French Commodores Ship “M--sive” took coals at Trincomalee on the 28th December 1867. The Gunboat Diamant is still in this neighbourhood. I have no information of the Italian surveying Frigate in the Red Sea.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

Enclosures
1, Acknowledgement of Order Letters etc ….
Page 138
2. Men required to complete squadron
3. Return of Appointments Removals etc
4. Passing certificate of Mr.Robinson Clerk “Octavia”
5. Return of Measure (Treasure  ?) conveyed “Argus”
6. Return of men entered from the Merchant Service “Nymphe”.
7. List of expenses incurred “Nymphe”
8. Report of Surveyor – Officer Mr.Soneth ? Eng. “Nymphe”
9. Inspection Sheet of  “Penguin”


No.84

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Yalybb” (?) 19th March 1868

Re-embarkation of Troops

Actnd 14 Apl.No.160
Reply 24 April MM180

HMS Octavia Annesley Bay
18th March 1868

Sir,
In the possible event of an early reembarkation of the Abyssinian Expeditionary Force, it will be most desirable that the Army, and Transports should remain no longer than is absolutely necessary in what  will probably be in a few months the hottest part of the world.
2. I am informed that HM 4th 33rd Regiments will go direct to England, & I beg to suggest that the Secretary of State for India, be moved to grant the use of the Indian Troopships for the  removal not only of  those two regiments but for the general purpose of the expedition if the embarkation should take place between April and October.
I the event of permission being given, I would suggest that the 3 ships on this side pass the summer months at Suez, and those on the other side at Malta to await instructions from me.
His Excellency the Commander in Chief concurs in the general proposal to use these ships in the re-embarkation.
I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.


Page 140

2 Enclosures
No.89
Submitted
19 March

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “T.A.Gibb” 19th March 1868
Act 2nd 14 April No.160

HMS Daphne Annersley Bay
18 March 1868

MMr. F.H.Goodyear Acting 2nd class Asst Engineer requesting confirmation.


No.90
2 Enclosures
Submitted
19 March 1868

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “T.A.Gibb” 19th March 1868
Act 14 Apl No.160
Reply 17 April S.166

HMS “Vigilant” Annesley Bay
14 March 1868

Forwarding demands for new boats, the last ones having been in use 5 years.

These boats could easily come through the Isthmus of Suez Canal, and the “Vigilant” will be in the Red Sea early in May.


No.91
Submitted
18th March 1868

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “T.A.Gibb” 19th March 1868.
Act 14 Apl No.160
Reply 6 April L.149

HMS “Daphne” Annesley Bay
5th March 1868.

Applying for the Rg to be removed from the name of Ian Hayward AB. (?)


No.92
1 Enclosures

Forwarded from Annesley Bay per “T.A.Gibb” 19th March 1868

Reporting Proceedings in Abysinnia

Act.14Apl.No.160
Reply 7 April M.152

HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
19th March 1868

Sir,
In continuation of my report No.79 of the 5th Instant, I have the honor to state that I returned on the 17th from a visit to the interior of the country as far forward as Addigerab, I found there with great regret that I could not go on to Head Quarters of the Commander-in-Chief without prolonging my absence fromm Zoulla longer than was advisable, but having had the advantage of spending a day with Brigadier General Schneider at Senafe, and a longer period (?) with Major General Malcolm at Addigerab, I have obtained almost as full an insight into all matters connected with the expedition as if I had been able to reach His Excellency.
2. The road from Koomaytee to the Edge of the table land, 3 miles from Senafe, has been fully and faithfully described by the newspaper correspondents. It length is 52 miles and it follows for the whole distance, the bottom of a winding ravine, having many smaller tributary ravines running into it from either side.
The ascent is imperceptible (except in one or two places) until within 2 miles of the edge of the table land, where the bed of the ravine has been deserted, and a somewhat sharp zigzag road has been carried up the face of the ----t on to the plateau.
3. With the assistance of large working parties the Engineers have made a most excellent road throughout, in many places their labour was confined to marking out the road and clearing it of loose stones, but there are some heavy works principally in the zigzag, and a Soowo, where (the ravine being very narrow) the passage was blocked up by numerous boulders which (were) too large to be broken up, or removed,,, were built up to with smaller stones, and thus the road was carried over their tops.
4. The road from Senafe to Addigerat is generally speaking equally good, but it is more undulating, and there are a few places where it is somewhat rough.
5. There are stations at intervals averaging 13 or 14 miles, at all these stations there is an ample, and excellent water supply, which has generally been obtained by digging ordinary wells or where the soil is suitable by the use of Nortons tubes. At each station there is an officer with an establishment of some sort, and at all but one there is a Commisariat depot. The ordinary days’ march  is from one of these stations to another.
6. The native population between Senafe and Addigerat is far more numerous than I had supposed, there are many small villages in sight from the road, and much land is under cultivation, some of the soil is apparently very rich, but at this season there are no growing crops.
7. From Senafe onwards all our provisions with trifling exceptions are carried by the natives.

Page 142

Natives at a fixed tariff. They are dealt with through the heads of the villages who all work under Chiefs of higher rank deputed by Prince Kapa, to look after our interests in the various districts through which we pass.
8. There are more candidates for carrying than we can supply and at Addigerat continuous complaints are made to the General in command that the work has not been fairly apportioned.
9. A bare sufficiency of dry grass is brought in at all the mountain stations, but most of the grain has as yet to be brought from Zoulla. At Antala considerable supplies of bread and flour are purchased and it is believed that at Ashangi (?) they will be still more abundant.
10. Notwithstanding our enormous importation of l---- transport animals, it is as much as they can do to carry up tents, baggage, and ammunitions, and to supply (the) Commisariat wants up to Senafe. (?)
It is perfectly certain that but for the assistance given by the natives in forage, and carriage, we should not by this time have advanced in force, beyond Senafe, and I doubt whether the expedition could have proceeded. The existing happy state of affairs is owing principally to the intense love of dollars implanted in the natives minds, but probably very much to the influence gained over Prince Kapa by the Commander-in-Chief at their recent interview.
11. I attach the general order showing the final distribution of the troops. They have by this time mostly reached their stations.
12. The advance from Autals was delayed 3 days by the supposed necessity of making a road over a very difficult country, but it appears there is a perfectly easy line which had been concealed by the Chief through whose territory it passes, because he is hostile to Prince Kapa, and was therefore afraid of having a road made through his country.
13. The Commander-in-Chief commenced his march from Autalo on the 12th Inst.
14. Mr Munzinger has reported from Sab most favourably both of the disposition of the natives and the probability of supplies, native  --niage (?) is abundant, and that there is but little doubt that the advance will reach Magdalar by the end of March.
15. Mr.Ilad (?) writes from Therdores camp that His Majesty        “speaks openly of the arrival of the English & rejoices that they have come. He is tired and disgusted with his own troop and that his long and anxious desire has been to see a really disciplined army moving under the direction of one man, and that when he has seen this he will be content to die” I overtook the Naval Brigade at Addigerat which they left on the 10th well & in good spirit.
16. On my return to Zoulla I found that all had gone smoothly during my absence. Chamberlains wells have been largely used & Captain Campbell with the “Octavias” arti----s has raised a tank over one of these, with a continuous pipe to the railway siding, thus saving the labour of rolling casks a distance of 260 yards.
17. In anticipation of an early re-embarkation of the expeditionary force, I am about to complete the transports at this anchorage with water (?), & they will be provisioned so soon as the Commander-in-Chief is satisfied that he can spare the provisions. His Excellency will give me the earliest possible intimation of the termination of his operations so that I may send to Bombay for the hired steamers at that port, with them, & the vessels from Suez, I hope that all may return in one trip.
It may be that my anticipations will not be fulfilled, but I wish their Lordships to see that everything is being done to ensure before hand that the re-embarkation when it does take place, shall be carried out successfully.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


Page 157

No.112
1 Enclosure

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Swakim” 19th April 1864

Proposal for Checking the Slave Trade

Act.1 May.No.192

HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
7th April 1868

Sir,
Although from the necessity of employing almost the whole of the East Indian Squadron in duties connected with the Abyssinian Expedition, I have been unable to do much this season towards putting down the East African Slave Trade, I have yet devoted much time and attention to a personal study of the records on the subject left with me by my predecessor, and it seems to me very clear that the views expressed by Colonels Playfair and Pilly, and others, that the slave trade should be attacked between Socotia and the Main, & on the shores of Arabia, in preference to the neighbourhood of Zanzibar are undoubtedly correct.
2. As a mere question of strategy the course recommended by those officers is superior to that generally pursued in as much as the slaving dhows would have no knowledge of the whereabouts of the cruizers (?), whilst under the present system the position of every vessel is known, and communicated along the coast with great rapidity.
3. Again the system of watching the exporting ports entails a vast amount of misery and deaths among the slaves themselves who are marched about inland from port to port, and creek to creek, suffering often from want of food in the endeavour of their owners to avoid our blockading cruizers (?)
4. S---- the present system involves the complete dispersion of the squadron whereas udner the other it would be kept more compactly together, and in a condition more favourable to the maintenance of good order & discipline.
5. Looking to the results obtained for many years past, I am impressed very strongly with the idea that we have hitherto been filtering our strength away by endeavouring with limited means to stick (?) simultaneously the trade with Madagaseay as well as that with Arabia, and the Persian Gulf, and that it would

page 158

would be far better to concentrate our forces upon one point.
6. The consequence of attacking the slave trade both Northward & Southward has been that our captures in either case have amounted to so small a percentage of the total numbers run, that the risk of running has been practically none, and the trade has been in no way checked.
7. I would propose to their Lordships that advantage should be taken of  the increase to the squadron caused by the Abyssinia war to make a grand effort in concert with the vessels belonging to the Bombay Government to endeavour so to block the Straits of Socotra and the coasts of  Arabia, so far as Ras el Hadd as to ensure the probable capture of a large proportion of the dhows which may attempt to run cargoes during the autumn season viz from September to October in 1868, and again in the months of March, April and May 1869.
8. Their Lordships are aware that owing to the monsoons it is only in the 5 months named that slave dhows attempt the passage, and our vessels could refit, or visit other parts of the station during the  other 7.
9. if success attended the experiment, the  system might be continued, until the Arab trade shall have been rooted out, and then it will be for discussion what steps should in the meantime be adapted with regard to the Madagascar trade.
10. Under any circumstances I would leave one vessel to support the Consul of Zanzibar and she  mmight  occasionally cruize off Cape St.Andrews.
11. Their Lordships will observe that I  propose that the Bombay Government ships should join in this crusade, I do so because in a blockade such as that proposed numbers are essential and heavy armaments of naval --.
12. I attach a copy of a letter addressed to the Bombay Government on the subject to whom I –

Page 159

I have sent a copy of this.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.110
2 Enclosures

Forwarding 2 Reports of  Survey
HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
8th April 1868

Act.1.May.No.192

Sir,
I have the honor to forward herewith a Report of Survey held on Lieutenant E.A.Bolitho Transport Officer as well as a report on a marine of HM Ship “Highflyer”.
2. Captain Pasley Senior  Officer at Bombay reports that Lieutenant Bolitho would leave for England by the mail thereabout to start (28th March)

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Suakin” 9th April 1868


No.113

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Suakim” 9th April 1868

Disposal of Steam Launches etc.
HMS “Octavia” Annesley Bay
8th April 1868

Act.1.May.No.192
Reply 1 May.68.S.193

Sir,
I am informed by Captain Edye that a steam launch is much required at Suez for the use of HM Indian Troop Ships. I request their Lordships will inform whither when the expedition breaks  up I may leave the one I now  have at Suez in the charge of Commander Chitty for that purpose.
2. I propose taking 4 iron barges to Trincomalee for use in coaling the troop & other ships and to ship for England the other 2 steam launches, and lease the tugs & other lighters to be disposed of by the Bombay Government unless in the meantime I hear of a market for them at Suez or Aden.
3. I propose sending the condensers to Aden in hopes that  sooner or later they may be purchased by the Peninsular & Oriental --


Page 160

No.129

Forwarded from Suez Per Post 6th May 1868

Vacancies for  Engineers
HMS “Octavia” Suez
8th May 1868

Actnd 5 June 1868.M.227

Sir,
I have the honor to bring to your notice the vacancies for Engineer in the ships under my orders as shewn on the other side hereon.
2. These officers are much required and I have to request that they may be sent out overland as early as possible.

I have etc.
Snd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty

“Spiteful” 1 Chief Engineer --- Lewis invalided.
Argus. 1 Engineer, --- Galbraith invalided
Star. 1 Engineer, --- Brimacombe (?) drowned.


No.130
Submitted
1 Enclosure
7 May 1868

Forwarded from Suez per Post 8th May 1868
Actd 5 June 68.M.227

HMS “Highflyer”
Bombay 18th April 1868

Transmitting description of Henry Rowan Private R.M.L. – deserter from Forton Barracks.


No.131

Forwarded from Suez per Post 8th May 1868

Reporting having forwarded a Telegram.
HMS “Octavia” Suez
7th May 1868

Actd 5 June 68.M.227

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I yesterday forwarded the following telegram to their Lordships.
“If Troop Ships are at Alexandria by June 1st it will be early enough.
“ Please send “Daphne” 35 feet Cutter

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore
The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.132
1 Enclosure

Forwarded from Suez Per Post 8th May.1868

Reporting proceedings of  Abyssinia
HMS “Octavia” Suez
7th May 1868

Actd 5 June 68.M.237

Page 168

Sir,
In continuation of my report No.119 of the 16th April 1868 I have the honor to state that on the receipt at Zoula of the glorious news communicated to their Lordships by Sir Robert Napier telegrams of the 8th 10th and 14th April every possible demonstration was made of joy at the success of our aims and the attainment of the object of the war. Royal Salutes were fired by the men of war and others were given for Her Most Gracious Majesty for Sir Robert Napier and for our own brigade. The transports of which there were upwards of 130 in the Bay as well as the men of war were dressed with flags and our demonstrations were heartily joined in by the Egyptian Frigate “Ibrahamite” and the French Gun boat “Diamante”. His Excellency Abd el Kader Pasha writing his men (?) congratulations and Monsieur le Captain Bose paying us a formal visit accompanied by his officers expressing on his own part and by anticipation on that of his Government his extreme delight at our success.
2. It appears from the letters received since the Commander-in-Chiefs telegrams that the Naval Brigade were the first corps to come into action on the 10th April and that they contributed their full share towards the enemies defeat and I hope that when the Commander-in-Chiefs dispatches are received it will be seen that the prophesy which I entered upon in my letter No.20 of the 2nd Sept 1867 that “if the Brigade should e engaged with the enemy the distinctness of its armaments will tend to make its services conspicuous notwithstanding the  smallness of its numbers” will prove to have been amply justified by the results.
3. Although the object for which this war was undertaken has been so completely attained yet much of the work of the Navy remains still to be done and I therefore refrain for the present from bringing to their Lordships notice the services preformed by the Squadron under my command.

Page 169

So soon as the re-embarkation has been substantially effected I hope to close this series of letters by a final dispatch shewing in detail all that has been done and to name it those who have specially distinguished themselves.
4. On the 25th Ellt I heard from His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief that he did not expect to be able to commence his re-embarkation before May 20th for that the country between Magdala and Addigerat was not altogether friendly and that he would therefore retain a firm hold of his ports up to the last.
5. My Flag ship having been 4 months at Ansley Bay and the weather having become very hot and a certain amount of fever having shewn itself on board, I thought it right to take advantage of the – weeks which would elapse before the commencement of the re-embarkation to freshen up myself, the officers and crew so at to make them safely to stand the remaining 6 weeks at Zoula, I accordingly left that port on the 27th April and arrived here on the 5th Instant. I shall sail with the mails on my return on the 11th.
6. This being the Pilgrim Season the Egyptian authorities have ordered a five days quarantine for vessels coming from any port in the Red Sea.
7. The climate is most  delightful the thermometer ranging between 60o  & 70o and already the change has effected a wonderful improvement in the health of all on board. (for enclosure see pg 171)
8. I attach Captain Edye’s letter reporting a serious fire on board one of the transports at Zoola.
I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.133
8 Enclosures

Forwarded form Suez per Post 8th May 1868

Reporting proceedings
HMS “Octavia” Suez
7th May 1868

Actd 5 June 68.M.227

Sir,
In continuation of my report No.120 of -


Page 177

Enclosure No.2 in Letter NO.148 of 1868

Transport “Euphrates”
Ansley Bay, 28 May 1868

Sir,
I regret to have to bring to your notice the utter unfitness of Lieut F.G.Shaw as a Transport Officer.

In the report of a Court of Enquiry into the Grounding of the “Bombay Castle”, of which ship he is the Transport Officer on the 30th November last, which was held before my arrival in Ansley Bay and of which report I have no copy in my possession the officers reported that “The Naval Assmt has not kept a log, is not provided with nautical instruments and has not worked sights regularly in order to assume himself of the safe navigation of the ship.”

I called upon Lieut Shaw for such explanation as he might be able to give respecting such gross neglect of his duty, but since his arrival on the 15th Ultimo in Ansley Bay, having been absent ever since December last, I have been unable to obtain any explanation from him.

The “Bombay Castle” has presently returned from the Red Sea, where she cast off and left a vessel she was ordered to escort to Aden, without sufficient cause. I need not say that the expense and inconvenience entailed by such a proceeding is great and when sanctioned by a Transport Officer it appears impossible to hold her Captain to be in blame.

I am unwilling to be held responsible for any Vessel in whose management Lieut Shaw may have anything to do.

I beg to urge that the “onus” of Lieut.Shaw presence may be removed form a Transport, in such a manner as you may deem fit.

I have etc
Sd G.Tryon
Captain &
Principal
Transport Officer

Commodore
L.G.Heath
HMShip “Octavia”


Page 183

List No.2

Officers and others recommended for  Promotion on account of  being the senior of their respective ranks in the Squad  in (excluding “Highflyer” and Penguin) in some cases on account of additional special cla---s

Names   Rank   Ships    Nature of Services

Thos Bas--- Commander “Nymphe”
G.F.L.P.Maclean Sen Lieut “Octavia” Senior and Gunnery Lieutt of the Flag Ship, much
      employed superintending and organising working
      parties etc, A most excellent steady Officer of 9
      years standing.
Thos Pounds Nav Lieut ----do---- For a long time in charge of the working
      arrangements, employed to land heavy weights,
      locomotives, etc, requiring special skills, a most
      excellent officer of 8½ years standing.
--- L.Dick Surgeon  “Satellite”
G.L.H.Clarke Sub Lieut “Dryad”
Hnry ---Staines N—Sub Lieut Spiteful
--D.Longford Asst Surgeon  ---do---
Geo Heild Asst  Payne “Octavia”
N.H.Grove Engineer “Vigilant”
Stephen Sheldon Asst brig 1etc “Spiteful”
H L.Bliss Gunner 2 etc “Satellite”
G.. Wilkie Gunner 3 etc “Dryad”
--- Simpson ---- 2 etc  “Satellite”
Robt Bruce Corps 2 etc “Daphne”
Jos Richards Corps 3 etc “Daphne”
Richd Kelting ---ds 3 etc “Dryad”
Note Mr. Wilkie is the second in seniority the senior not being deserving of promotion.
The Seniority of the Engineer Officer requires confirmation as no official List was attainable.

Page 184

Vessels during the monsoon and their future disposal will rest with the Bombay Govt.

The “Spiteful” during her short cruize captured six dhows with 107 slaves on the Arabian Coast and the “Agus” which was away from Aden but 23 days succeeded in capturing 2 dhows with 129 slaves near Ras Ali Besh Ouail on the East African Coast.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore


The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.

No.163
10 Enclosures

Forwarding Reports of  Survey
HMS “Octavia” Zoola
5th June 1868

Act.13 July 68 M.276

Sir,
With reference to my letter of yesterdays date transmitting the reports of Survey on Invalids I have the honor to inform you that those on the Officers were omitted to be enclosed.
I forward them herewith.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.


No.164
4 Enclosures

Forwarded from Ansley Bay per “Forge” (?) 11th June 1868

Services rendered by the Royal Navy in connection with the Abyssinian Expedition
HMShip “Octavia”
Annesley Bay, 10 June 68

Act.13 July 68.M.276

Sir,
The re-embarkation of the Abyssinian Expeditionary force being now practically completed I propose to lay before their Lordships a summary of the wok which has been done by the Royal Navy and to submit the names of those officers and other whom I wish to bring to their special notice.
2. The Expedition which Sir Robert Napier has so successfully commanded will take in place in history as one of the most remarkable of modern days.
3. It was undertaken at an enormous cost for the rescue of a few Englishmen, who names but for their imprisonment would never have been heard of by the British Public.
4. It has been pushed 400 miles through a country about which little was previously known except that it was mountainous and pathetic – a country supposed to be without water, and access to which could, it was said, be gained only by crossing great deserts or scaling tremendous mountains – a country moreover, where resources in supplies were doubtful, and the disposition of whose inhabitant towards us was uncertain.
5. It has been conducted by a General who with prophesies of failure on all sides and from all countries – without adequate time for organizing his land Transport, upon which he know all would depend – with a period for campaigning limited on the one side by the S.W. Monsoon which prevented an earlier commencement of operations, and on the other hand by the local rains which have already begun to fall – nevertheless answered to the call made upon him,,  and by continual and unceasing personal vigilance, by patience, by boldness, by perseverance has gained England’s End and saved her name amongst all nations.
6. The Navy part in the Expedition has been a humble one, but it has been none the less arduous and none the less useful, for the Army landed at a post without fresh water, without grass, without resources of any kind but what were brought to it by sea. It had not only to build its own landing piers, to make its own railway, to raise its own huts and warehouses but also  to bring from distant ports the materials of which all these were made, and under these circumstances it is impossible but that the assistance of the Royal Navy must have been very valuable, not merely form the actual labor it supplied, but from the superintendence and organization which it brought to bear, upon the operations of landing. The Navy moreover furnished a small but efficient body of fighting men which did

page 186

did good service in front of Magdala, and at a subsequent duty it supplied a larger body for the defence of Senafe. These last were however almost immediately re-embarked as fresh Troops arrived from India.
7. For this Expedition there have been landed by the help of, and under the superintendence of the Royal Navy.
Troops    14,214
Cavalry horses   2538
Natives not soldier  26,254
Land Transport horses or mules 19,580
--------do-------- Camels  6045 
--------do-------- Bullocks  7086
--------do-------- Donkey  1850
--------do-------- Elephants  44
and all there, with the exception of  (?) a portion of the land Transport Animals, have been again re-embarked.
8. The Navy has superintended the manufacture of 27,470 tons of fresh water for the use of the Troops on shore, and 9,800 tons for replenishing the Transports for the return voyage. It has landed railway plant and Engines for a line of 12 miles, and it has freely lent its officers to supplement the departments of the Army which required them. Finally – it has fixed and maintained light houses and supplied a body of Pilots with such success, that although there have been 621 entries into the harbor of Zoolla, but one vessel (a small brig) has been lost.
9. I have thought it right to recapitulate these services and to place them on record, because although less brilliant and less dazzling than those performed by that portion of the Army and Navy in advance, they have been I think of vital importance to the expedition, and they have been performed with the utmost zeal and alacrity notwithstanding the intense heat off the climate.
10. I wish now to bring to their Lordships notice the good conduct of the Officers and men who have carried out this work. Their …

Page 187

11. Their Lordships have already acknowledged the services of Captain Edye in the early part of the Expedition. Upon that officer and upon Captain Colin Campbell have since then devolved all the organization of the necessary working parties, the distribution of the tugs and lighters, and the general superintending of the watering arrangements. Captain Campbell commanded the Naval Small Arms Brigade which was not sent up in consequence of the unexpected arrival of HM’s 26th Regiment from India. Captain Tryon has worked the Transport department with great zeal and energy and has secured the good will of all the heads of departments with whom he has had to deal. Captain Bradshaw’s services in erecting and maintaining light houses, in superintending the pilot department and in performing other  hydrographical duties have been acknowledged by their Lordships. Mr Bardin Inspector of Machinery afloat has been most zealous and useful.
12. Sir Robert Napier will doubtless refer in his dispatch to the services of Commander Fellowes, Commanding the Naval Rocket Brigade. The conduct off  the remaining Commanders, including Commander Maxwell of the Flag Ship and Lieutt Allen in temporary command of the ‘Dryad’, has been worthy of all praise, and whether in attending to the interest of the Expedition at Aden or Suez, or Berberah or employed in the dreary work of maintaining the pilot services at the 7’ Fathom patch has been such as to merit my warmest commendation.
13. Equally, good has been the behaviour of those, in lower rank. The officers and Ships Companies have had unusually trying work and notwithstanding the burning  heat of the sun, and constant unavoidable exposure to it,  they have done their duty with the greatest energy.
14. My Secretary Mr.Wyatt , has carried out the extra work which has been thrown upon him with his usual zeal and intelligence and I am equally satisfied with Lieutenant Walker by…

Page 188

My Flat Lieutenant.
15. I attach a list of the Officers and others who have, I think earned promotion by special services, also a list of the senior  officers in each rank in the squadron under my command (Exclusive of  “Highflyer” and “Penguin”) and a third list of officers deserving favorable consideration and I trust that when their Lordships consider that all England is rejoicing at the complete success which has been obtained, and at the unexpected early cessation of an enormous expedition they will be pleased to promote those in lists 1 and 2 and perhaps even those in list 3.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
______________________________________________________________
List No.1

Officers and others recommended for Promotion in account of special services.

Names     Rank  Ships  Nature of Services

T.H.B.Fellows  Commander “Dryad”  ]
Chas S.Cardale  Sen. Lieut. “Satellite” ]
Geo.L.Atkinson  Act Sub Lieut “Octavia” ]
Heny H.M.Sedgwick Asst Surgeon ----do---- ]
Duke A.Crofton  Mid(on passing) ----do---- ]     With the Royal Naval Rocket Brigade.
Wm Boxer  Asst Paymt  ----do---- ]
Davd May  Navy Lieut ----do---- ]
..(Harbouur Master) ……----do---- Has had hard work. There have been generally upwards of 150 vessel in port and
        scarcely an accident has happened.
Jas.N.Ferguson  Engineer ----do---- Specially useful to the Expedition having  
       Taken charge of the Locomotive Dept.
Wm Callan  Gunner  “Argus”  Strongly recommended by Commander .          Hallows as useful at the embarkation of        .  . …        Animals at Berberah.
Thos King  Chief Boatswn    “Octavia” General  good work.
Chas R.Lewis  ch Mate Carp M “Star”  Special good  conduct and skill in erecting         lighthouses.
Chas Barkley  Private  “Octavia” Special good conduct and intelligence at the  .  (doing duty as Acting Corporal)   water depot.

Page 190

List No.3

Officers and others recommended to the favorable consideration of their Lordships.


 
Names   Rank   Ship  Nature of Services
Geo W.Allen  Senr Lieut “Dryad”  A steady officer who had temporary …        command of the “Dryad” during the absence …       of Commander Fellows with the Brigade.
S.. Darwin  Lieutt   “Satellite” Very diligent and hard working super- ..        intended the collection of Fresh water in the …        early days of the Campaign.

F..R.B.Kemp  Lieut 1st   “Octavia”  Commanded a batter of the Rocket Brigade ..        on the 10th & 13th April, Recommended by    ..       Commander Fellows for  promotion and .. . . .        only put in this list by me on account of his ..        being so young a Lieutenant.
John Marshall  Gunner 2d “Octavia” A very superior officer and has had much .. ..       hard work.
Rt Blaley  Capt F Trp “Octavia” ] Very useful in landing animals etc.
Heny White  Capt M Trp “Octavia” ] ..
Jak Payne  Gunner .. “Octavia” Very strongly recommended.

Summary of  Proceedings of  thhe R.M.Brigade
HM Royal Naval Brigade
Camp Massawah, 2 May 68

Sir,
As the campaign is now drawing to a close and the R.N.Brigade under my command will ere long be broken up and re-embarked I avail myself of the opportunity of a halt to report on the general proceedings of the Brigade.
2. The Brigade in compliance with instructions received from you, landed on the 25th January and encamped on the Plain.
3. I commenced organizing them immediately and as soon as mules could be supplied, lost no opportunity of drilling in ba… and exercising firing rockets and performing field evolutions.
4. The men rapidly acquired a perfect…

Page 191

Perfect knowledge of the  drill and the management of  the mules and I was therefore enabled to report the Brigade ready to march to the front, immediately that the rocket tubes were supplied.
5. On the 27th February I received orders from Brigadier General Stewart, Commanding at Zoolla to proceed to Antalo on the 29th February to join the advance division with Sir Robt Napier HCN HCSJ, the Commander in Chief.
6. The Brigade marched at daylight on the 29th and consisted of
2 Farriers     100 men and officers (Europeans)
13 Grasscutters  3 Watercarriers
6 Bearers for sick  1 Sweeper for  hospital 
88 Batter mules  54 Baggage and provision mules or the equivalent in camels
11 Officers horses 9 Bullocks for carrying water
7. We carried with us 5 days rations for men and animals
8. We arrived at Antalo on the 16th March and I reported the arrival of the Brigade to Brigadier General Collins. In the evening order arrived from Sir R.Napier to send on all the Troops belongings to the 1st and 2nd Brigades 1st Division to the front immediately.
10. The R.M.Brigade was at first attached to the 2nd Brigade 1st Division and marched from Antalo on the 17th March for  Magdala in campany with B.21 Battery Royal Artillery 33rd Reg Int 23rd Punjab Pioneer and a detachment of Scind Horse.
11. After incessant and harassing marches we arrived at Lat o the 23rd March and joined the 1st Division for Sir Chas Staveley.
12. The whole Division under the command of Sir Chas Staveley marched on the 25th to join the Commander in Chief who was reported to be at Dilla.
13. On the 29 March we marched on Fakazze and on arrival were enable to telegraph to the Commander in Chief who was encamped and

Page 192

the heights at Sandara.
14. We marched on the 30th March up the almost perpendicular ascent leading to Santara and joined His Excellency the Commander in Chief.
15. On my reporting the arrival of the Brigade to his Excellency he gave me a warm and hearty welcome and expressed the gratification he felt at having a force representing the navy under his command. He also expressed his desire to see the Batteries drill and fire in order that he might estimate the value.
16. I accordingly turned out the Naval Brigade and proceeded under the immediate direction of the Commander in Chief, accompanied by his staff, and a large number of the officers of the Army, to the top of an adjoining hill and fired rockets at various elevations as directed by His Excellency.
17. On the conclusion of the practice, Sir Robert expressed his satisfaction at the appearance of the Brigade and at the efficiency ranges and power of the rockets and immediately placed us in the 1st Brigade under Brigadier General Schneider.
18. On the 31st March we marched with the Commander in Chief and 1st Brigade to which we were now attached on Iahro (?) and thence on Abdikoom, Sindee and acroos the Jetha on to the Dalanta Plain overlooking the Bashilo and in view of King Theodores Camp in the neighbourhood of Magdala.
19. On the 10th April we marched with the Commander in Chief at 4.50am on Magdala by the King road down the steep and precipitous south bank of the Bashilo and across the river.
20. After crossing the Bashilo a force consisting of a squadron of Cavalry, the 14th Reg and Punjaub Pioneers were sent under Sir Charles Staveley over the hills on the right of  the Kings road, but the path which they took was found impracticable for laden mules with the Batteries; and the Naval Brigade and A21 battery RA were therefore ordered to proceed by the Kings road up the Anogie Pass, the

Page 193

.the Naval Brigade leading.
21. After ascending the Pass and on skirting Felangi and Falla Hills within range of the guns of the latter, King Thoedore who on Falla opened fire on the Naval Brigade and very shortly afterwards his  Troops numbering about 4,000 men descended with astonishing rapidity with the intention of attacking and cutting us off having supposed that our batter mules were laden with baggage.
22. The Commander in Chief who was on the spot, immediately directed me to form up on a Commanding position, dismount the batteries and open fire on the enemy, at the same time directing the Infantry to
Adsamea (?).
23. So easily are the Rocket Tubes handled that they were brought into action in a very short and the R.N.Brigade were enabled to return the first shot, after this the fire was kept up with rapidity until the enemy were driven back, and I was ordered to take the batteries down on the plain to clear out parties of King Theorores Troops who were firing from behind bushes.
24. The action was concluded and the Troops ordered off the field at dark by which time 2000 of the enemy were killed and wounded.
25. As much rain had fallen during the afternoon and evening all were wet through, but as no tents were to be pitched and a vigilant lookout had to be maintained, those not on guard slept in the Batteries.
26. At 2.30am of the 11 April we shifted our ground and encamped on the hill to the NW of Magdala. At 8am Lieut Priddeau and Mr Flag, two of the captives accompanied by one  of the Chiefs of King Theodore, came into the camp with a message from Theodore stating that he felt  unable to contend with the British Force after the result of yesterdays engagement, and offering to give up the captives, Sir Robert wrote to say that King Theodore must come into camp himself and that both he and  his family should receive honorable treatment. The King returned the letter with indignation, but subsequently relented and on Sunday the 12th April sent in all the European captives

Page 194.
. captives, but did not come in himself.
27. On Monday the 13th April, as the King had attempted to fly, but had found it impracticable to do so, and had not given himself up or surrendered Magdala, Sir Robert resolved to proceed with the attack and accordingly the force consisting of the 1st Brigade and 2nd Brigade which had by that time arrived were moved on to the plain between Folangi and Falla and the 33rd and 14th Regiments to Felangi. This was done without any resistance being offered and the Naval Brigade and Artillery moved up under Magdala. King Theordore’s Army now laid down their arms by thousand  and only a small number remained with the King in Magdala.
28. The Naval Brigade were placed on a ridge between Falla and Felangi, facing Magdala from whence we fired (?) rockets into Magdala until order to Advance . On our arriving under the gate of thye Town, the assault had commenced and I therefore ordered the rocket Tubes and some rockets to be carried up by hand after the Infantry. The town was speedily taken and King Theodore shot himself near the gate.
29. We bivouaced in Magdala that night and returned to camp on the morning of the 14th April.
30. The rockets as reported by the captives and natives had astonished the King and his  Troops and one had gone close to him while he was in Falla, which he afterwards picked up and said to Mr.Flad it was impossible for him to fight against people who used such things.
31. The Pallas Tribe now began to come in and to rob and plunder the defenceless inhabitants who ere leaving Magdala in great numbers for Debra Tabos and Pigre, I was therefore ordered to send out pickets with rockets to drive them off and this duty was performed until we struck our Camp.
32. On the 17th April we recrossed the Bashilo, ascending 3500 feet by the Kings road, on to the Dalanta Plain, and encamped. On the following day Magdala ws burnt and this..

Page 196.

.that I was obliged to order it to be discontinued and the bells  to be worn around the waist instead. I would suggest that “suspenders” be tried such as are now used in the Coast Guard Service and introduced by Admiral Ryder.
39. I have now the very great pleasure of reporting that altho’ very few punishments have been requisite to maintain discipline, there are a proportion of most deserving and praiseworthy officers and men of whom I would wish to bring the names of the following more particularly to your attention.

Lieutenant Charles Searle Cardale who has always most zealously performed his duties and assisted me most materially and has always been ready to perform any duty.

Mr Henry Hanlon Murray Sedgwick; Assist Surgeon; whose constant kindness to the sick, often under trying circumstances has met with my warmest approbation.

Charles Henry Jones Chief Gunner mate who has performed the duty of  Sergeant Major.

Robert Smith Gunners Mate who has done duty as Quarter Masters Sergeant, and has been most attentive and useful.

Thos Vaughan Boatswains Mate and John Graham Boatswains Mate who have throughout the march had the trying duty of  bringing up the rear, and superintending the reloading of mules that have cast their loads or  broken down.

Benjamin Starkes, Coxswain of the Barge and Chas Austin, 2nd Capt F Trp who have done duty as Sergeants of Batteries.

40..I feel I should fail in my duty were I to close this dispatch without recording the cordial and now warm feeling that has been shown by all ranks of our comrades in the Army towards the Naval Brigade, from the Commander-in-Chief to the private soldiers and which feeling we most heartily reciprocate.
41. I trust that the complete success in every particular of the Naval Brigade of the Abyssinian Field Force will give you satisfaction.

I have etc
Ld F.H. Butler-Fellowes
Commander

Commodore
L.G.Heath


Page 228 – not very clear.

To seas of the --------- of HMS “Octavia” and an extract from a note from Captain Bradshaw of HMS “Star” en------ to the Expedition, They shew,
1st …. That the selling of liquor by the crew of the Bombarda was n---------s
2nd…. That there was a sufficient crew on board to navigate her at least as far as Massawah
3rd …. That there being excellent anchorage on both sides of the vessel she was lost because she did not make use of it when darkness came on.

7. The P------ing was cast off at 8.30am on a beautiful day at a distance of about 20 miles from Massawah. The Master of the Fly (?) states, her crew seemed sufficient and ---sails readily set. Mr Karthor (?) admits working to windward all day and it appears from the 6th Paragraph of his letter that but one of his crew was absent with the mate and pilot. The mate of a vessel of 45 (145 ?) tons is not generally ---- different from other sea men, and Zoolla pilots are perfectly ignorant of piloting but if Mr.Kasethor was really ill and if the presence of his mate and pilot were really essential, he should when each off it once leave sought an anchorage and waited the return of those persons, or as he had (Para 12) two boats on board have sent one away to Massawah in reach of them. ( ? )

The vessel was clearly wrecked not from being weak handed but through the imprudence of the master in not anchoring at night.

8. I presume that I was only doing my duty as the Naval Commander of the Expedition in turning out of the Post a vessel which disobeyed orders I had given in furtherance of the interests of the Expedition and that I have sufficiently shewn that the wreck of the vessel 15 hours after being cast off was due only to the carelessness rashness or incompetency of her Master.

9. I have only to add that I have no knowledge of any application having been made for assistance after the wreck, as stated in Para 113 of Mr.Kerithes letter. No such application was made or reported to me.


Page 243
No.233
2 Enclosures

Forwarded from Zanzibar per sailing ship 30 August 68

Boarding of French Dhows byh HMShip “Nymphe”

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Zanzibar 31st August 1868

Act.5th Nov.68.M.300
Sir,
I forward herewith Commander Bernardiston’s letter reporting (in accordance with Para 11 of their Lordships Confidential instructions without date ( ? ) on the subject of the right of visit) the boarding of 12 French Dhows during his recent cruize in the Mozambique Channel.
2. When replying on the 27th Instant to Mr.Churchill on the subject of the French consuls complaint (vide No.231) I was not aware that more than one dhow had been boarded.
3. In the case of dhows there are literally none of those indications (mentioned in the 9th para of their Lordships circular) which apart from the Flag gives to a practiced eye a notion of the nationality of the vessel and doubtless if all visiting for the sake of verifying the Flag should be forbidden the slavers would soon learn how to carry on their Trade in the prefect immunity.
4. In the recent cruize of the “Nymphe” 67 Dhows were boarded of which 9 have been condemed as slavers, and I think the thus proved existence of such a large proportion as 13½ per cent of slaving vessels together with the absence of any external evidence of the characters of dhows except their Flag justify Commander Bernardiston in having on the occasion exercised his right of visit so extensively.
5. I have however pointed out to him that under para 10 of the Instructions he verify the flag entirely on his own responsibility and I have enjoined upon him the utmost care and --- inspections together with a strict observance of all the prescribed formalities when ever he may ---- think it his duty to exercise the right of visit.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty.
Whitehall.


Page 246

Treaty in 1843, the trade was carried on as briskly as ever, and that if His Highness wished to retain his domestic Trade, it was imperative on him to work hand in hand with us in our attempts to put down the Foreign Trade, otherwise I felt sure (?) that public opinion in England would oblige the Government to sweep both away together. I said that I thought proposals made in my letter to Mr.Churchill, (which Mr.Churchill read) would if carried out by His Highness divide the two trades by a broad line of demarcation, and that the foreign trade could then be no longer carried on under cover of the other.
4. At His Highness’ invitation I called upon him this morning to hear the result of his deliberations, there were present besides Mr.Churchill and myself, five Arab Councillors who are about to proceed to England on the subject of the Muscat subsidy.
5. His Highness began by stating his great anxiety to comply with all my wishes, and said he would at once order distinctive marks to be put upon the vessels engaged in (in) the domestic Traffic, but that some --- on time must elapse before the management could be completed, and that he had already complied with a request of Mr.Churchill, that the numbers shipped in each dhow should be but half of those hither to crammed in. With respect to my other proposals, viz that he should take the domestic import trade into his (own ?) hands and allow one port of export in Africa and one of import in Zanzibar, he stated that both he and his Councillors were sure their adoption would diminish his income, that he was now very poor, having been forced by England to pay the arrears of the Muscat Subsidy that the payment of this subsidy to the murderer of his brother was against his religion, and that he was about to send two trusted Councillors to England to  beg to be excused from paying in future, and that if that were granted, he might then be in a position to bear the financial loss which the adoption of my proposals would entail

Page 247

but that for the present he could not fa---. He  said further that he intended to burn all northern Arab dhows that arrived at Zanzibar, and he trusted that proved his anxiety to put down the outside  traffic.
6. In reply I thanked His Highness for the one concession he was prepared to make, and I endeavored to shew him that under my proposal, it would be his own fault if, having the (mancholy ?) of the trade, he failed to raise from it a revenue equal to that which he now received in duties but that it was clear from his statement that a large portion of what he now took in duties arose from slaves in excess of the wants of Zanzibar, and which were therefore eventually exploited again, and that to that portion of his revenue I conceived he had no right consistently with his ------ a real and earnest opponent of the Foreign Traffic. I pointed out also, that the plea of poverty would hardly stand good, because he had always previously paid the subsidy without complaint and would have continued to do so contentedly had his brother still lived and reigned in Muscat. I then said that I was not officially acquainted with what had passed in respect to the Muscat Subsidy, but that as His Highness had devoted so large a portion of his remarks to that subject I would give him my views, which were that England seeing two brothers, sons of a father who had been her old and valued friend, about to fight, stepped in at the wish of both brothers, is arbitrator between them, and seeing that the Kingdom about to be divided consisted of one portion rich and fruitful, and the other  poor and barren, she decreed that the rich country should pay an annual subsidy to the poor one, but that it was not a personal payment by one Sultan to another, but payment by one country to another country. I said more over, that I conceived England could not as His Highness seemed to suppose, release Zanzibar from the Subsidy in exchange for the concession with respect to the Slave Trade, that the two questions had not necessarily anything to do with one another.


, and that I supposed the amount  of the subsidy had been fixed solely from a consideration of the comparatively larger revenue raised by Zanzibar. I said also that ( he ?) was glad to hear that it was only a financial objection which His Highness made to my proposals, and that (as I intended) he would when his Ambassadors returned and he finally know what he had to expect with respect to the Subsidy, be ready again to take up their discussion. Finally His Highness expressed a hope that now there was a Vice Admiralty Court in Zanzibar, all dhows detained in his dominions should be brought there. I explained the physical impossibility of towing them against the monsoon, but I pointed out that although the dhows themselves might have been burnt, the legality of their capture would almost always be tested at Zanzibar, and that restitution in money could be claimed when dhows had been illegally distroyed.

7. I attach a translation by Mr.Churchill of the letter addressed to him by the Sultan, in reply to his which enclosed my proposals. Under (?) that letter, vessels not having the distinctive marks but with slaves on board, might be captured thoughout the year, subject to the condition of their being brought to Zanzibar. Mr.Churchill will endeavor to get rid of that condition and if he succeeds the concession will be of some little value.

Enclosure No.2
Letter dated 2nd Sept 1868

8. I trust however, that HM’s Government will take advantage of the presence in England of  the Ambassadors about to discuss the Muscat Subsidy, and make engagements with them also on the subject of the Slave Trade, they having, I understand power to deal with that question.
9. The destruction of an insignificant percentage of the plant employed in working a traffic yielding a profit of many hundreds per cent can have no perceptible influence on the traffic, and the rescuing of negroes who have already gone through the greater portion of the suffering incidental to their transfer from the interior of Africa, is of doubtful good to these individuals

Page 249

..individuals  so received. For 25 years we have followed one dull routine, capturing a few dhows here and there, rescuing a few slaves and consigning them to a fate which is certainly worse physically whatever it may be morally, than that which awaited them in Arabia. We have paid from (pounds)10,000 to (pounds)15,000 annually in bounties to the captors, and we are none the nearer the attainment of our end.
10. I think the time has come for changing our system and making a more earnest effort, and as the Sultan has rejected the proposals which I made to him, the ground is clear for other arrangements, and if the question is taken up by the Government, still more radical remedies might be applied. All civilized Governments have now completely washed their hands of the Slave Trade, and I see no reason why Zanzibar should be allowed to continue it. The legalizing of any traffic whatever by sea, makes the  repression of that which is illegal more difficult, and the populations in the Island being very large and the price of Slaves in the market very low there can be no real want of labor.
11. I would suggest, First  - that the Foreign Office should insist upon the adoption, after the expiration of one year, (so as to give time for conveying information to the interior of Africa) of one port of export from Africa, and upon the gradual diminishing of imports into Zanzibar as recommended by Mr.Churchill, but on a still more rapidly declining scale, with a final cessation of all imports in 6 years, and as the amount of  the Muscat Subsidy was fixed from a comparison of the revenue of Zanzibar and Muscat, it would be but fair when we enforce a reduction of the Zanzibar revenue, to allow the subsidy to decrease, pari passu, and finally to erase it the same time as the Slave Trade, and thus a most embarrassing question would be got rid of.
Second. That the India Office should act both diplomatically and by means of the vessels belonging to the Bombay Government, (which if necessary might require ( receive ?) special commissions to legalize

Page 250

..legalize their proceedings) upon the  rulers on the Coasts of Arabia and the Persian Gulf.
Third. That seeing that the export Slave Trade in the West Coast of Africa has now ceased to exist, their Lordships should reduce that squadron to a mere squadron of observation and send the4 surplus to this side.
12. The principal additional expense incidental to carrying out these suggestions would be in the Vice Consulates or Agencies which it would be necessary to establish at Kilwa, Lamoo, etc ---- and in a small additional cost for freight of Naval provisions, but it would soon be amply covered by the cessation of the large annual bounties now paid on account of capture.
13. I trust their Lordships will not think that I have given my opinion in too free a manner. One of the principal duties with which I am entrusted is the suppression of the East African Slave Trade, and if I have presumed to indicate the steps which I think should be taken by three great departments of the State for finally attaining that object, it is because I feel that although what we have hitherto done may have annoyed and harassed the Slave Traders it has had no effect towards suppressing the Trade. The successive exports for the last five years from Kilioo alone are officially reported as 18,200, 17,500, 16,821, and 22,038.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall


No.238

Forwarded from Point de Galle 22 Sept 1868

Slavers at Zanzibar placed in charge of the East African Mission

Act.5 Nov.68.M364

HMShip “Octavia”
At Sea Lat L.228 Len --- 4’8”
6th September 1868

Sir,
I beg to inform you that I have made arrangements with the Right Reverend Bishop Tozer under which the Naval Stores at Zanzibar will be locked..


Page 254

With reference to your letter of the 21st July last, N.5.283 (?) promoting Mr.-W.Richards Carpenter of the Daphne to the 2nd class, I have the honor to inform you that I have withheld the delivery of this officer’s Warrant pending the decision of a Court Martial which will be held to try him on charges of negligence  of duty and drunkeness.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall

No.245

Forwarded from Trincomalee 28 Sept 1868

Establishment of a Persian Navy in the Persian Gulf

Ack.5 Nov.68.N.-14

HMShip “Octavia”
Trincomalee, 26 Sept 1868

Sir,
In reply to your letter. No.295M directing me to report my opinion on a proposal made by the Shah of  Persia to establish for service in the Persian Gulf a Persian Navy under the command of British Naval Officers, I have the honor to state that I entirely agree with the general views of their Lordships as expressed in your letter of 20 July 68 to Mr.Hammond.
2. The position taken up by England in the Persian Gulf is of such a nature that she must have the complete control of all the Naval Forces employed as the Police of that Sea and any divided authority is to be  deprecated.
3. There is already in the pay of the Bombay Government a force of small steamers sufficient for the usual requirements of the Resident in  the Gulf but not being embodied as a regular service nor under any Act of Parliament for the maintenance of discipline, the vessels lack the prestige which attaches to ships of the Royal Navy.
4. I understand it is in contemplation to alter the arrangements under which these vessels are serving and to bring them under regular discipline either by Regulations resembling..

Page 255

..resembling those of the old Indian Navy or by making them a branch of  the Royal Navy, in either case the one point wanting will be supplied, and the Resident in the Gulf having a certain number of these vessels at his disposal will be able to attend to any requisitions which may be made through (by) the Persian  Govt through (and with the approval of) the English Minister at Teheran, and thus all excuse for forming an independent Persian Flotilla will be taken away.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodre

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall


No.246

Forwarded from Trincomalee 28 Sept.1868

Appointment of an Assistant Paymaster may be appointed as Secretary’s Clerk

Act.5 Nov.86.M.364

H.M.Ship “Octavia”
Trincomalee, 26 Sept 1868

Sir,
I have the honor to request that their Lordships will be pleased to appoint an Assistnt Paymaster as Secretary’s Clerk, vicci Mr.Boxer Promoted.
2. I have heard very favorably of Mr.George Liddell Assistant Paymaster serving in the “Indus” at Davenport.
3. There are no Assistant Paymasters in the Stations.

I have etc
(signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.247
26 Sept 68 submitted


Forwarded from Trincomalee, 29 Sept. 1868
Act 5 Nov, 68 No.344 ?

H.M.Ship “Euphrates”
Bombay 24th June 1868

Application for an allowance to Numbers of Committee enquiring into complaint against Engines of “Jumna” and “Euphrates”

(Snd ) Montague B Dunn
Captain


 NEW HANDWRITING Page 345

--Marseille Forwarded per mail Steamer at Munt ( at Sea Lat’ 17 9 ½ ---
5 April 1869

Sir,
I have the honor to forward for the information of their Lordships, a copy of some correspondence on the subject of the condition of slaves captured by our Cruisers.
2. I beg to suggest that information as to the distribution and condition of Slaves liberated in each year should be called for from the Mauritius, the Seychelles, Aden and Bombay, and published in the Blue  Books.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall
London En

Enclosures

--page 356
No.1 – Letter No.113 of 1869 from L.Gonne Esquire, Secretary to Government, Bombay
--page 356
Sub Enclosure 1- Extract par 5 & 6 from a letter from the Resident at Aden to the Government of Bombay, 18 Dec No. 480/1305 ? of 1868,
--page 357
Sub Enclosure 2. – The Resident at Aden to the Government of Bombay 24 Dec.No. 489/1370 of 1868
No.2. – My letter to Governor of Bombay dated 19 January 1869 p312 of S.Letter Book.


No.93
5 Enclosures.

Marseilles
Forwarded per Mail Steamer at Muscat --- “Dryad” 16 April 1869

Respecting Domestic Slaves carried in Arab Dhows

Act 24 May 1869 M.156

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
Lat:20.4.----
9 April 1869

Sir,
Previous to leaving  Bombay I was informed by His Excellency the Governor that he had submitted the enclosed letter (marked No.1) to the Advocate General of Bombay, and that that Officer had given an opinion, that the capture and cond----- of

Page 345

 the Dhow No.1 mentioned by Sir E.Russell was illegal.
2. Sir Seymour informed me that he had sent the correspondence to the India Office, and he promised to send me the Advocate General’s opinion but owing probably to want of time it did not reach me before  sailing. The Advocate General, however, had not the evidence given by the Officers of the “Star” before him, and it was his opinion only, and not the reasons on which it was founded, which was to have been communicated to me, and I therefore do not wait for the written document but forward the remainder of the correspondence for their Lordship’s information, and with a request I may receive instructions for future guidance.
3.- I understand that the Advocate General considers it essential that a Captor should prove that the Slaves on board the Captured  Vessel are there for the purpose of Slave Trade, and that their being in the status of Slavery, and, therefore, liable to possible sale is not sufficient.
4. This interpretation of the Treaties will, if upheld, strike a severe blow to our efforts to put down this trade, for the result will assuredly be that every Trading Dhow will carry a small number of Slaves purchased by the Master  who will take care to have no condemnatory documents on board, and who will keep to himself his intentions as to future disposal of his property.
5. Under the 1st Article of the Treaty with Muscat, dated October 1845, the Sultan engages to prohibit under severe penalties the export of Slaves from his African Dominions.
In the 2nd Article he  engages to prohibit similarly

Page 346

..similarly their importation from Africa into his Asian Dominions; and the 3rd Article gives power to our Ships to seize Zanzibar Vessels “Carrying on the Slave Trade”.
6. It seems to me a fair interpretation of the Treaty as a whole to consider the Three Articles as in harmony with one another, and that the 3rd Article gives us permission to punish in our way the very same offences which the Sultan undertakes in the 1st and 2nd Articles to punish in his way, and that as the Sultan will punish indifferently an Exporter or an Importer, so in our case Slave Trading must be deemed to consist in either export or imports, and they need not necessarily be combined.
7. If this be so the export of a Slave beyond the limits defined in the 3rd Article is sufficient to confiscate the Vessel in which the export is made.
8. Sir Edward Russell seems to agree with the Advocate General in thinking that Slaves may legally be carried to Sea, provided they are not originally intended for sale on the voyage, but as he has not decreed compensation for the destruction of the Dhow in question, I presume he considers the burden of proving innocent intentions lies with the Owners of the Slaves Carrying Dhow, whereas I understand the Advocate General considers innocency must be presumed until the Captor proves the contrary.
9. So far as Officers in command of H.M.Ships are concerned, it is clear that they can only be guided by the Slave Trade Instructions, compiled and issued specially for their use, and as in these instructions no limitation is put upon the quality of the Slaves..

Page 348

I presume that their duty is to capture every vessel they may find (Iall 22 Par 51) having slaves on board, and if the Law Officers in England should rule with the Advocate General of Bombay, it will be necessary to revise these instuctions.
10. I attach extracts (Enclosure No.3) from native correspondence intercepted on board one of the Dhows captured by the “Star”, and referred to by Sir Edward Russell. They plainly shew that whatever my have been the original of a Zanzibar Arab in purchasing his Slaves, it does not prevent his subsequently exporting them for Foreign Sale, and I attach also Extract (Enclosure No.4) from the Blue Books shewing the frequent mixture of legitimate and illegitimate cargoes in the same vessel.
11.- A copy of  Commander de Mantzow’s letter in Reply to my inquiries with reference to the capture of Dhow No.1 is herewith enclosed (marked No.5)

I have etc
S 2nd L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London En

¬¬¬¬¬------Enclosures--------

Vide page 359
1. Forwarding copy of a letter from Political Resident at Aden.
Vide page 359 
Sub Enclosure. Remarks on the Condemnation of Dhows
2. Remarks on Resident at Aden’s letter No.34 / 164 of the --- 1869.
Vide page 362
3. Extracts fomr letters found in Dhow No.5
Vide page 363
4. Extracts from Blue Books
Vide page 364
5. With reference to the Capture of  Dhow No.1 from Commander de Kuntzow.


Page 353

No.67
11 Enclosures

--Marseilles
Forwarded par mail Steamer at Muscat HMS “Dryad” 16 April 1869

Reporting Proceedings

Act.24 May 1869. M.155

HM Ship “Forte” –
Muscat, 16 April 1869

Sir,
In continuation of my Report of proceedings, No.85 of the 1st April, I  beg you will inform their Lordships that  I arrived at this Port on the 13th Instant and found here HM Ship “Dryad”.
2. Commander Colomb arrived on the 12th having made the round of the Persian Gulf visiting such ports as Colonel Pelly, the Resident wished.
3. His arrival at Bahrain (having on board Captain Smith, Assistant Political Agent) was most opportune as he found the whole Bamfan (Bahrain ?) community in a state of greatest alarm owing to an attempt which was about to be made by Mahomed ben.Kalifeh to recover the Cheiftainship from which he was removed by Colonel Pelly when assisted by the “Vigilant” last year. Captain Smith made such arrangements, as he thought sufficient to ensure peace and on the arrival of one of the Bombay Gunboats he informed Commander Colomb that his services were no longer required.
4. The various tribes on the Arabian side of the Gulf appear to be in their usual state of ---ize warfare – true to their origin – “their hand is against every man, and every man’s hand against them’. At one town that of Khir Hassan, Commander Colomb found a whole tribe called Izzbissa ? embarking with all their belongings including the roofs of  their huts so as to avoid the impressment of their boats by an inland tribe wishing to make war upon one inhabiting the Coast. The Izzbasseen feared that if their boats were so taken they..

Page 354

..they would be punished by Colonel Pelly for infringing the maritime truce and  that their only way out of the difficulty was to emigrate en masse, beyond the reach of the inland tribe.
5.. The town of Muscat is quiet. Their Lordships will remember that there are 3 claimants to the Sultanship.
1st Syed Salim (Sifed?) who although it is said that he murdered his Father the late Sultan, was after a time acknowledged by our Government. He was ejected from the Throne last October (our Government remaining  neutral) by
2nd Syed Azan, who now reigns, but has not been acknowledged by us.
3rd Syed Toorkey, Uncle to Salim, who having been imprisoned by the latter on ascending the Throne was released on the requisition of  Colonel Pelly. Toorkey on leaving Prison immediately began to collect forces to turn out Salim and would certainly have succeeded in September 1867, but for the intervention of the Government of India. The Government felt that Toorkey having received his liberty only because of their intervention on his behalf it would be unfair to allow him to make use of that liberty to oust the man who would otherwise have had him in his power. Toorkey was carried off to Bombay in the “Octavia” in 1867, under an agreement signed by Salim, Toorkey, Colonel Pelly and myself, granting a pension to Toorkey so long as he chose to remain at Bombay. He is still in Bombay but has been informed that since Salim is no longer on the Throne he is at liberty to assert his rights and to leave Bombay when he pleases.
.6. The Government of India forbids expeditions by sea but remains otherwise neutral. There is however a feeling…

Page 355

..feeling that Toorkey has been somewhat hardly dealt  with, and his success would be pleasing to the Government.
.7   Azan seems a man of energy. His hobby is  the suppression of  smoking & of the weaving of silk dresses, but he does not molest the Banifan traders, subjects of England who reside in Muscat in large numbers, and I am glad to say that he is about to meet Salims forces (if they should attack him) at Berkah some 50 miles North of this so that Muscat itself will not be disturbed.
.8. The contending parties feel themselves so completely dependent, ultimately upon England that they are most anxious not to displease us, and I feel confident that in all their struggles the persons and property of our subjects will be respected.
9. I sail this evening with the “Dryad” to act for the suppression of the Slave Trade along the Arabian Coast. As already reported I shall probably be at Aden towards the end of May, and at Trincomalee by the end of June.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commoore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall
London En

------Enclosures--------
1. Return of Appointments Removals
2. State of Condition of HM Ships inE – Station.
3. Copy of Journal
4. Periodical returns of HM “Forte” 31 March 1869
5. ----do---do--- “Star” ----do---do---
6. ----do---do--- “Dryad” ----do---do---
7. Voucher for  Incidental Expenses H.M.S “Spiteful”
8. ----do---do--- do ----do---do---
9. ----do---do--- “Forte” ----do---do---
10. Report of  entry of Seamen form a Merchant ------
11. Report on Chief Engineer Invalided “Nymphe”


Page 411

Majesty’s Ships on the East Indian Station to 30 June 1869

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary

Of the Admiralty
Somerset House, London, W.C.


Via Marseilles

No.178

Forwarded per French Mail Steamer from Mahi 5 Aug 1st 1869

Supply of Navy Lists  to H.M.Ships

Act 26 Sept 1869.M.No.267

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 5.14.S, Long 66.32 E.
31 July 1869

Sir,
I have to request that the supply of Navy Lists may be sent for the Ships on this Station. None have been received of a later date than October, 1868.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

Forwarded par French Mail Steamer from Mahi 5 Augst 1869

Inefficiency of Interpretation employed in connection with the Slave Trade

Act 26 Sept 1869 M.No.26

No.179
1 Enclosure

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 5. 14.S Long:66.32 E
31st July 1869

Sir,
I enclose for their Lordships information a copy of a letter from the Acting Political Agent at Zanzibar complaining of the unfitness of the interpreters attached to the Squadron.
2. It is of the greatest consequence for the credit of H.M.Service that everything should be done which can in any way help the Officers commanding H.M.Ships employed in suppressing the Slave Trade in the difficult task of discriminating between legal and illegal traders and since there is a general concurance amongst the Indian Political Officers in the opinion expressed by Mr.Kirk and since the Sultan of Zanzibar has recently made a similar complaint, I beg to suggest that the responsibility of selecting and examining Interpreters for service in H.M.Ships should rest in future with the Bombay Government who have the native..

Page 412

..native sea faring population of Bombay a large field from which to select candidates, and who have Boards for examinations in Oriental languages at their disposal.
3. This plan would not only ensure efficient Interpretations, but it would relieve H.M.Officers from the disagreeable accusations now sometimes made against them of destroying innocent vessels on the sole evidence of illiterate Interpreters chosen and selected by themselves.
4. I do not propose establishing an organised establishing an organised body of Interpreters but merely that men should be found, examined, and supplied as they may be wanted upon application to the Secretary of the Marine Department of the Bombay Government.
5.. Interpreters are now paid as Able Seamen, it would be  advisable in order to ensure respectable and intelligent men, to raise the pay to that of a 1st Class Petty Officer viz: “1/11” per day, or perhaps a Rupee(2/-).
6.. Should their Lordships think propos: I beg that the Secretary of State for India may be moved to give the necessary instructions in this matter.

I have etc
( S 2nd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall,  London S.W.

Enclosures

No.202/54 of 1869
From John Kirk Esquire, Acting Political Agent, Zanzibar.
To C.Gonne Esquire, Chief Secretary to Government, Bombay 16th May 1969

Sir,
With reference to the communication
Govt Reso P.I.No.469 12th Feby
----- ” -------- No.727/10th March
Com.of Police to Political Agent Zanzibar No.591 of 24th March marginally noted I have the honor to report for the information of the Right Honb the Governor in Council that  thirty six negroes have been delivered over to me by Abbas bin Abdulla, Master of  H.M.S. “Prince of Wales” I..

Page 412

..I have carefully examined these men individually in their own language, and find that they are all free and thankful to return to this country, where they can work as Sailors, and are among their friends.

His Highness Seyed Majid desired me to express his thanks to the Bombay Government for having sent back those who were no slaves, and whose position if treated as such, might be worse than it is here.

Such a mingling of slaves and free men as has taken place in the instance which is certainly no exception, could only occur through inefficient or dishonest interpreters, and I regret to say, as a class, those who embark in our cruizers as Interpreters are an illiterate and worthless set.

At this moment I am engaged with the trial of Dhows destroyed on suspicion by H.M.S. “Nymphe” and I regret to say that the Interpreter on whose authority many of  these Dhows have been burned, is a man who cannot read Arabic or Swaheli, and who therefore cannot explain to the Officers the nature of the purpose under which the Dhow is sailing.

The interpreter who was on board H.M.S. “Star” when most of the thirty six free men now sent back were taken, is a man equally incompetent.

I have etc
(Sd ) John Kirk


Via Marseilles

Forwarded per French Mail Steamer from Mahi 6 Aug 1869

Application for Medical  Officer

Act 26 Sept M.No.267

No.180

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat: 5.14 South Long: 46.32 East ?
31 July 1869

Sir,
I have to request that you will move their Lordships to be pleased either to appoint a Surgeon to H.M.S. “Daphne” vice Dr.Mortimer invalided in March last or an Assistant Surgeon to H.M.S. “Forte” vice Mr.Dillon who is at present in medical charge of the “Daphne” the..

Page 421 follows.

End

 

Page 412
Via Marseilles

No.194

Forwarded per post from Aden 16th September 1869

Tidings of Dr.Livingston

Ack 7Oct 69. M No.279

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Zanzibar, 31st August 1869

Sir,
I beg you will inform their Lordships that an Arab named Ali bin Salim called this morning upon Dr.Kirk, the Acting Political Agent and Consul, and shewed a letter from his brother who is Governor of a town called Unyanjembe, distant one month’s journey from Ugigi the place to which all recent supplies for Dr.Livingston have been sent.
2. A translation of the letter will be sent by Dr.Kirk by this mail to the Foreign Office. It seems certain from its tenor and the verbal explanation of Ali bin Salim that a servant of the Governor of Unyanyembi left Ugigi 4 months ago, and that he had there seen “the White Man”, but it does not seem quite clear whether he saw him just before returning to his master at Unyanyembi or at a previous date.
3. A caravan from Ugigi is expected to reach the Coast in a month and Dr.Kirk hopes then to receive further information.
4. At a recent interview with His Highness the Sultan of Zanzibar, I begged that every scrap of intelligence which might arrive respecting Dr.Livingstone should be at once communicated to Dr.Kirk. His Highness appeared fully aware of the great interest taken in the matter by the English Nation and expressed his earnest sympathy with us.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Controller of Victualling

Forwarded per post from Aden 16th September 1869

Victualling and Clothing Accounts at Zanzibar

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 3.42 N, Long 47.31 E.
6th Sept 1869

Sir,
In forwarding the enclosed Clothing and Victualling Accounts for the Zanzibar depot, I beg to…


Page 436

“to Commander Meara for a report; and you are if the subject should spring up in any official conversation with the Hon. (Hora ?) Minister to assure them of my wish to carry out strictly the conditions of our treaty, and not to exceed the powers granted to us under it, but you may mention at the same time that form the number of dhows captured on the Coast within the last year, it is clear that the Madagascan Slave Trade is carried on very largely and I trust they are doing, and will continue to do all that in them has to suppress it”.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commander

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.212

Forwarded per post from Aden 24th September 1869

Slave Trade East Coast of Africa

Ack 16 Oct 1869 M.206

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Aden 22nd September 1869

Sir,
In reply to your letter M.No.217 of the 14 July with its enclosures, on the subject of the alleged unsatisfactory system at present pursued by Her Majesty’s Cruizers in dealing with the Vessel suspected of being engaged in the Slave Trade, and directing me to furnish their Lordships with specific information and explanation on the points raised in the enclosure informing me also of the intention of forming a Committee to report upon the whole subject, I have the honor to refer in the first plan to my letters to their Lordships Nos.112, 214, 231, 233, 237 of 1868 and 53, 92,93 and 123 of 1869 and to request that copies of them and of their enclosures may be laid before the Committee.
2. With respect to the specific cases referred to by Mr.Olivay, viz a capture by H.M.Ship “Rebel” and one by H.M.S. “Nymphe” I have to state that the “Rebel” being on the Cape of Good Hope Station I am not in communication with her Commander: With respect to the Vessel captured and destroyed by the “Nymphe” and for which compensation has been decreed by the …

Page 437

..the Vice Admiralty Court at Zanzibar, I beg to point out that an appeal against the decision of the Court is as open to the Captors as to the captured and to state that Sunderland (Iunderland ?) Commander Meara is about to appeal against Dr.Kirk’s decision, and that although doubtless in this case the Government would pay the compensation if the judgement of the Vice Admiralty Court should be maintained, yet the claim will not be against the Government as stated by Mr.Olivay but against the Captors.
3. On the 9th April 1869 in my letter No.93 I reported to their Lordships the opinion given by the Advocate General at Bombay, that the presence of domestic slaves on board the Dhow was not evidence sufficient to convict her as a Slaver, I gave reasons in that letter against this opinion, and I pointed out that if the Advocate General was borne out by the Law Offices in England, it would be necessary to revise the Instructions given to Naval Officers. I would now again urge an immediate answer to that letter for it is a hardship to the Officers commanding on this station that notwithstanding the numerous precedents condemning Dhows for having domestic Slaves on board, and notwithstanding the distinct instructions to them at page 22 of the book specially drawn up for them by their Lordships vize “You will be justified in concluding that a Vessel is engaged in or equipped for the Slave Trade 1st If you find any slaves on board etc---etc----etc---” they should yet be subject to advance decisions on this very point.
4. Dr.Kirk states that the Vessel having been taken in one of the Sultan’s harbors South of Quitea (?) could only be captured under the letter of Seyd Said of 6th May 1850, Dr.Kirk must have written this in ignorance of Lord Stanley’s decision in his reply of the 24th December 1844 to Dr.Seaward, in which his Lordship states England will not at present respect the Sultan’s territorial waters in any part of his dominions. Upon my recent visit to Zanzibar I brought this letter to Dr.Kirks notice.
5. The Political Agent also states “it would be absurd to think that Zanzibar slaves would be sold at the Coast” I do not think such a supposition

Page 438

..supposition is at all absurd, it might as well be said it was absurd suppose (bit crossed out) a London house would be sold in Yorkshire. There are numerous cases proved by intercepted correspondence that, just as unsound horses are sent for sale to distant fairs, so domestic slaves of troublesome character are sent out of Zanzibar with instructions to sell them for what can be got so long as a Man is a Slave, so long is he a saleable article, liable to be sold, and as such England must if she continues her contest with the Slave Trade, forbid his being exported.
6. Dr.Kirk states also that the reason for Slave trading with Madagascar was over, it was in fact just about to begin.
7. The complaint made of the illiterate characters of the men generally engaged as Interpreters in Men of War, is I think fully justified. I have addressed their Lordships proposing a remedy in my letter No.179 of 1869.

These are the only points raised by Dr.Kirk upon which I can afford their Lordships any information.
8. Referring now to Mr.Olivay’s letter to their Lordships of July 21st 1869 calling attention by Lord Clarendon’s desire to the unsatisfactory system at present pursued by Her Majesty’s Cruizers in dealing with vessels suspected of being engaged in the Slave trade, and suggesting that when there is not a full cargo of Slaves on board, the Vessels with a part or the whole of their crew should be sent to the port of adjudication etc, I have to state that orders have already been given under instructions conveyed in your letter M dated 12th March 1869, to send into Court the Master and a portion of the Crew of such Vessels, but is in most cases practically to take  the Vessels themselves into port owing to the strength of wind and currents, and I may quote in illustration of this statement the case of the “Daphne” and “Star” in the autumn of last year, the one capturing 15 and the other 24 Dhows near Brava, and it being as much as the Men of War could do to reach port themselves, so nearly was their Coal expended. To have towed even a single Dhow would in those cases have been out of the..

Page 439

..the question.
9. It is a mistake to suppose that suspected Dhows are always destroyed, their Lordships will observe in many reports that Officers have attempted to tow these vessels, and been obliged after a few days to destroy them from their weakness, but when Vessels are near to port as when the “Highflyer” made captures under Cape Guardafui in 1867, or the “Daphne” at Maculla in the spring of this year, the vessels were themselves taken in for adjudication.
10. I have been informed by Dr.Kirk that the correspondence taken in a Dhow captured at Zanzibar on a recent occasion, shewed that a great many individuals, some of them of high standing in Zanzibar society, were interested in that cargo and the habit of Slave dealing either wholesale or retail is so universal amongst the Arabs, that I think the reports of some of the Commanders under my orders to the effect that almost every large Zanzibar Dhow trading to the South, carries in the course of its rounds Slaves to Madagascar, may to a considerable extent be true, and if so, it remains doubtful whether the transfer of Dhows to the French Flag is prompted as Mr.Olivay supposes, by the habit of landing the crews of Captured Vessels at the nearest convenient place, or by a wish to carry on Slave trade without molestation from the English cruizers. I would refer on this point to Commander Meara’s letter enclosed in mine No.123 of 1869.
11. The printed Slave Trade instructions enjoin the bringing into Court of the Master, Crew and Passengers of captured Dhows, the practice has however for many years been generally abandoned in deference to the wishes of those persons themselves. I am however, of opinion that its revival under the orders given in their Lordships letter M of 12 March 1869 will be beneficial as ensuring a full representation of both parties in suits before Vice Admiralty Courts.
12. I believe that the last mentioned order – the establishment of a Vice Admiralty Court at Zanzibar and the improvement which will I hope under my letter…

Page 440

…letter No.179 of 1869 be made in the supply of Interpreters, together with the personal liability of the Captors for damage in cases of illegal destruction of vessels, are sufficient elements of protection to honest traders and that any further restrictions on the proceedings of our cruizers will diminish their efficiency as Suppressors of the Slave Trade.
13. Their Lordships are aware of my opinion that we are even now doing but little good and that to succeed we must put forth far more strength and energy, and that the most efficient step that England could take in this matter would be the purchase of the sovereignty of Zanzibar; whilst the very least that should be done, is the forbidding of all further exports of Slaves from Africa to Zanzibar or its dependencies, except in certain fixed (numbers for ------) and limited period under the personal responsibility of the Sultan. So long as the domestic trade is unlimited, so long will Foreign trade flourish.
14. I shall soon be at Suez within a weeks post from England, and I shall be most happy to answer any specific questions which the Committee about to sit upon this subject may wish to put to me.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


No.213
3 Enclosures

Forwarded per post form Aden 24th September 1869

Forwarding Punishment Return of H.M.S.T.Ships

Ack 16 Oct 1869.M.225

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Aden, 23rd September 1869

Sir,
I have the honor to forward herewith the Punisht Returns of Her Majesty’s Indian Troop Ships “Jumna”, “Euphrates” and “Malabar” for the quarter ended the 30th of June last.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall,

Page 444

..way come to my knowledge whilst he was with me, I should have stated to him my opinion of the course he had pursued and I do not doubt but that he would have acquiesced in it justice, and their Lordships would not have been troubled in the matter.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. S.W.


Via Marseilles
No.220

Forwarded per Post from Suez 17th October, 1869

Ward Room Mess debts of H.M.Ship “Octavia”

Ack 29Oct 1869.M.293

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 23.29 North Long 36.3.6 East
6th October 1869

Sir,
In reply to the latter part of your letter N.225 of the 24th July 1869, requiring an explanation as to the mess debts of H.M.S. “Octavia” I have the honor to state for their Lordships information that I can add but little to what was reported by myself in the “Form of Inspection etc” dated 5th March 1869, (forwarded as an enclosure in my letter No.22 of 27 March 1869).
2. The “Octavia” was commissioned at Portsmouth by Captain (now Admiral) Charles Hillyer in June 1865 and it appears that a Messman was appointed by the Ward Room Officers and allowed to incur a debt of (pound sign)600 subject to a guarantee of (pound sign)30 a month by the Officers. It is to by presumed that the Commander-in-Chief at Portsmouth would have been made acquainted with this arrangement when he inspected the Ship, and that their Lordships would have been informed of it through his “Form of Inspection – etc”.
3. I took command from Admiral Hillyar on 29th July 1867 and if the (pound sign)30 per month had been monthly forwarded to England the debt would have been cleared off before that date.
4. I believe I may state with certainty that Admiral Hillyar left with me the last quantity audits of Mess accounts and that they were shewed…

Page 445

.. shewed me indebtedness in the part of any of the messes, and as I remained in command of the ship only until 17th September 1867, no further quarterly audit ever came before me personally.
5. In January or February 1867 I became by accident acquainted with the indebtedness of the Mess, and I directed Captain Hall to make a special enquiry into the matter and it appears that the Mess Committee and the Auditors of their accounts conceived that the Mess was not answerable for the Messman’s debts, and they had habitually made a quarterly return shewing no liabilities.
6. I pointed out to the officers they had acted wrongly, that Article 160 Page 52 of the Adden.. placed “the proper management of the affairs of the Mess” in the hands of the Committee, and that Article 161 directed the auditors “to make a close inspection of the bills and receipts”, and having received their promise that everything should be squared upon their arrival in England and having noted the debt and the promise to arrange it in my report of Inspection before alluded to, I conceived I could do no more.
7. I am glad to find from the last paragraph of Captain Alexander’s report that the officers had kept their promise.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London


Via Marseilles
No.221

Forwarded from Suez per Post 17th October 1869

Entry of Naval Cadets

Ack 29Oct 1869.M.293

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
Lat 24.46 N, Long 35.40 E
8th October 1869

Sir,
With reference to Circular No.46 C.of the 3rd August 1869 respecting Naval Cadets and Midshipmen, I have the honor to request I may be informed.
1st Whether “the number of marks presented for passing (part:11) is the same as the number qualified for permission to compete mentioned…

Page 455.

..disposal, should their Lordships not approve of my recommendation their will be ample time to send him out again before the trooping season is over.

I have etc
(Sd) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. SW.

Enclosures
1. Order to hold the Court of Enguiry
2. The report of Enquiry
3. Minutes of the Court of Enquiry


Via Marseilles

Store Department

Forwarded from Suez per post 29th October 1869

Coat supplied from the P. and O. Company

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez 25th October 1869

Sir,
With reference to your letter of the 14th Instant complaining that the regulations contained in Circular No.33 of 21st May last, have not been complied with in the care of coals shipped at Aden in September 1869, on board H.H.S. “Forte”. I have to state that the coals in question were not as you suppose purchased by me, but were drawn from the Peninsular and Oriental Company under what I have always supposed was a general contract with that Company.

The form in Circular No.33 was sent in for lime purchase at the same time.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

PS. The form will in future be sent in all cases

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

Forwarded from Suez per post 29th October 1869

No.235

Remarks on proposed changes in system under which Indian Government Ships are now managed.

Ack 9 Nov 1869 M.306

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 26th October 1869

Sir,
Your…

Page 456

Your letter M.271 of 23rd September 1869 conveyed to me their Lordships instructions to forward any observations I might have to make upon a scheme which was explained in a letter No.20 of 1869 form the Viceroy in Council to His Grace the Duke of Argyle for altering the system under which the Indian Naval forces are now conducted and further to report after communicating with the Government of India my opinion as to the strength and description of the force which would be required.
2. I have addressed the Indian Government on this last point, and propose if necessary to proceed to Calcutta either in the “Forte” or by sail from Bombay for verbal consultation.
3..Upon the scheme itself, I submit in accordance with their Lordships order the following remarks for their consideration.
4..The Indian Government has since the abolition of the Indian Navy continued to maintain considerable force of armed steamers, a force which rested only with that Government to maintain in numbers sufficient for all its requirements, but a force which must always be wanting to a certain extent in discipline and coherence, its personnel being under no articles of war and bound to the service only by the same law of contract which binds a domestic servant to his master from week to week or month to month.
5-It appears from the first eight paragraphs of the letter from the Viceroy in Council that  new ships have not been built or purchased to replace those decayed and worn out; and hence the force is now insufficient in numbers and the opportunity is  taken of pressing not only for the building of new ships, but for allowing the system (as regards a certain number of  them) under which they have hitherto worked.
6- The ships must be built under any circumstances and it is the  proposed change of system only with which their Lordships will probably deal.
7. The question then is simply this: shall these…

Page 457

..these ships when so built be manned under the present  system with native crews and European Officers not under martial law, or shall they be manned by native crews placed under that law and officered by th Royal Navy under the direct control not only of the Indian Government but of the Political Agents to whom that Government may delegate its authority.
8. The following are the advantages which would be gained by carrying out the proposed scheme.
1st The Indian Government would have a small increase in that portion of its Naval forces applicable to  Military purposes which is under its direct control – 2nd That force would be improved in character, being of a more permanent nature, more certainly amenable to discipline, and above all, always within reach, and ready for any consequences.
9. The following are the disadvantages which would attend the change – 1st The Indian Government would require a double Naval Administration, namely that relating to its men of war, and that relating to its more numerous vessels of other descriptions – 2nd The men of war being manned principally by natives would lose their special character and would no longer be looked at with the awe which now attends the ship of Her Majesty – 3rd If the Offices are appointed only for the ordinary term great difficulties  will arise from their being unable to speak the language of their crews. This difficulty will  be more serious in the Navy than it would be in any other service because of the number of technical terms and phrases which would have to be learnt, and the serious consequences which might arise if in any emergency an Officers were unable to give his orders without hesitation and in unmistakeable terms, and the difficulty will be the greater that these ships will not be mere steamers but are to be fitted with good sail power. This evil might it is true be remedied by appointing Officers for a longer period with a probationary term in which the language should be learnt, but such a measure would…

Page 458

…would be unfair unless the Officers were volunteers which would seldom be the case, unless Indian Pay was given – 4th There being no Naval Member of Council in the Indian Government or in that of either of the Presidencies,  I cannot think it wise to withdraw from Officers of certain rank and standing the power they now have of refusing to comply with the Requisitions of the Civil Authorities. Great responsibility is incurred by an Officer who uses that power, and he would only do so in extreme cases but it is within my personal knowledge that its exercise is sometimes most beneficial to the Public Service. Its influence for good is felt on both sides.
10. On the whole I am of opinion that the disadvantages attending the proposed change will far outweigh its advantages, and that it would be better to retain an additional man-of-war at Bombay to meet emergencies thoughout the year, than to adopt it. This vessel would have to take her chance of a hot weather trip to the Gulf when necessary, but she would in the ordinary routine of the station be changed once a year, and she would after all not be so badly off as some ships of the old Indian Navy which although manned in some cases principally by Europeans remained in the Gulf sometimes for three years without relief.
11. Finally I beg to state to their Lordships that I agree in the opinion generally held in India that the total abolition of the Indian Navy was a mistake, and that the Man-of-was element is in important respects, wanting in the present War ships of the Indian Government. I think the mistake should be remedied by placing the whole of he Indian Government vessels under our Articles of War and that they should be ruled by an Admiral inn the Royal Navy having a seat in Council and being on the same footing as are the Commanders-in-Chief of land forces. This would ensure unity of system and administration. Officers of the Royal Navy should be gradually introduced as..

Page 459

..as Commanders and Lieutenants restricting the appointments to five years with obligation to pass an examination in Hindostanee within the first twelve months, and giving Indian pay thenceforward. The existing Officers might have acting commissions such as were given to some of the Reserve Cutters Officers when transferred form the Customs to the Admiralty, and the roster might be so arranged that there should in no ships be more than one Officer at a time in a state of probation as to language. No Midshipman or Sub Lieutenant should be allowed to join, so that all Officers would be trained and grow up in the habits of the Royal Navy and the vigour and life of the Royal Service would thus be maintained in its Indian branch. The duties of Midshipmen and Sub Lieutenants being performed by Serangs (?) etc, scope would be given for promoting emulation and good conduct in the native crew by these promotions being open to them. Experience would shew whether it would be wise eventually to allow Officers to volunteer for a second period, and whether in that case, they should like the Staff Corps of the Sisters Service, be considered as having elected an Indian life, and be removed to a separate place in the Navy List.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.236

Forwarded from Suez per post 29th October 1869

On forwarding Minutes of a Court of Inquiry

Ack 9 Nov 1869 M.305

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 28th October 1869

Sir,
I request I may be informed whether the Instructions at Page 51 Article 17 of the Addenda which direct the minutes of Courts of Inquiry held by directions of a Commodore in Chief to be forwarded to their Lordships apply to investigations made by myself alone in cases where there are no Officers..


Page 470

Via Marseilles

Forwarded from Suez per post 26th November 1869

Respecting the capture of the slave dhow “Salaina” by “Nymphe” with reference to a claim made by Mssrs Raband Brothers of Marseilles
No.257
1 Enclosure
Ack 24th Dec 1869 336

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 23rd November 1869

Sir,
With reference to your letter M.179 of 23rd June 1869, and M.200 of 2 July 1869 and their respective enclosures on the subject of damage claimed by made Mssrs Raband of Marseilles for losses said to have been sustained by them through the destruction of a dhow under Hova ? colors on 21st February 1869, 12 miles from Nossi Beh by a vessel supposed to have been H.M.S. “Dryad” I have the honor to state that the capturing vessel was the “Nymphe” and not the “Dryad” and I enclose Commander Mena’s explanation.
2. I observe that there is no allegation throughout the correspondence that the dhow in question was not a slaver and was not lawfully condemned and I can only suggest that the Mr Raband may be ignorant of the fact that the condemnation of a Hova vessel for slave trading involves under our treaty with Madagascar the condemnation of its cargo.
3..With reference to that portion of the French Ambassadors letter to Lord Alexander which alludes to “les plaintes adresses d’une maniere general, par les negociants Francais, un (sur ?) les cotes de l’Afrique Orientals, contre les pro-sites arbitrairs des batiments anglais employes a la repression de la traite” I beg to say that no complaint has reached me during the period of my command of the nature referred to except thus reported to their  Lordships in my letters No.231 and 233 of August 1868.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.258

Forwarded from Suez per post 26th November 1869

Appointments of Acting Navigating Lieutenant to Cossack

Ack 24th Dec 1869 M.386

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 23rd November 1869

Sir,
In the event of their Lordships deserving an explanation as to my reasons for for (sic) appointing an Acting Navigating Lieutenant to H.M.S. “Cossack” notwithstanding my special application in No.217 of 27th ‘September 1869 for an Officer to be sent from England I beg you will inform them that believing my application must have reached their Lordships on 17th October, and finding that there was no Officers in the steamer leaving Southampton on the 23rd October, nor any notice of the appointment of one I thought it  probable their Lordships did not intend to send one out and I did not think it right to leave the “Cossack” longer without a responsible Navigating Officer the navigation of the Mozambique Channel being particularly dangerous.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.259
5 Enclosures

Forwarded form Suez per post 26th November 1869

Commander Meara’s explanation of  his proceedings at Mejunga in H.M.S. “Nymphe” in reply to complaints made by the Hova Government.

Ack 24th Dec 1869 M.336

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 24th November 1869

Sir,
In my letter No.211 of 22nd September 1869 replying to M No.174 on the subject of the supposed misconduct of Commander Meara of H.M.S. “Nymphe” at Majunju in March last; I gave certain reason for thinking that the complaint was probably exaggerated and I stated that I would receive a full report on the subject until I had received Commander Meara’s explanation (?).

That explanation has now reached me and I forward it together with other correspondence leaving on the subject for their Lordships information. I ..

Page 472

I trust their Lordships and Lord Clarendon will agree with me in thinking that Commander Meara’s conduct was not blameable.
2. The complaints made by the Lora Government as reported by Mr.Pakenham are 1st that upon the Governor refusing to give up the captured negroes a shot was fired from the “Nymphe” between the fort and the village by way of intimidation, 2nd that an armed party from the “Nymphe” landed and forcibly carried off certain Mozambique slaves. Commander Meara specifically denies both these allegations. That point of his report which states that the cargo recently landed is clearly erroneous but it does not affect the question.
3..The attached copies of reports from Commanders Meara and Colomb shew that there is evidently no bad feeling towards us at Mojunga, and I cannot help thinking that the suggestion in my letter of 14th July to Mr.Pakenham to the effect that this cargo of slaves would never have been given up by the Hora Government but for the information obtained by the “Nymphe” and her return to Mojanga on 9th March is correct, and that the complaints made by the local Governor were made by way of turning the ---les and warding off accusations against himself.
4.. Their Lordships will observe that the two Commanders take  opposite views to the sincerity of the Hora Government. The view taken by Commander Meara is supposed by the reports made to him of cargoes recently landed and by the known fact that a large trade was carried on last year and so far as I can form a judgment I am inclined to agree with him.
5. I trust their Lordships will allow me to convey to Commander Meara an intimation that his explanation is entirely satisfactory, and to Commander Colomb their approval of the judicious manner in which he has acted as to the negroes who swam off on board his ship, I trust also that the two men carried off by the “Nymphe” may be left at the Seychelles according to their wish expressed to..

Page 473

.. to me personally when at that port, and that compensation may be made to their late owner as suggested in my letter to Mr.Pakenham of 14th Aug.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

------Enclosures---------
No.1. Commodore’s reply to Mr.Pakenham’s letter forwarding complaint made by the Hova Government of Commander Meara’s proceedings at Mojunga 16th July 1869 vide Station Letter Book p363.
Sub-Enclosure – Extract from Comd Meara’s report of proceedings between 4th January and 27th May 1869.
No.2 Forwarding depositions made by 2 released Negroes who swam on board Nymphe at Mojanga Vide Station Letter Book Page 366
Sub-Enclosure – Depositions of 2 released Negroes who swam on board “Nymphe” at Mojanga.
No.3 – Commander Meara’s report of preceedings at Mojanga replying to complaints of Hova Government dated 29th October 1869.
No.4 – Commander Meara’s report on the Slave Trade carried on the W.Coast of Madagascar dated 29th Oct 1869.
No.5 – Commander Colomb’s report of proceedings giving his opinion of the Slave Trade with Madagascar dated 1st October 1869.


Via Marseilles

Forwarded from Suez per post 26th November 1869

No.260

Whether a Seaman Gunner lent to “Nymphe” may be paid as Gunnery Instructor.

Ack.24th Decm 1869. M.335

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 25th November 1869

Sir,
With reference to the latter part of my letter No.138 of 11th June 1869, I request I may be informed whether the man in question may be paid as Gunnery Instructor for the time he has been doing that duty in H.M.S. “Nymphe”.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.S.W.


Page 477

Via Marseilles
No.270
7Enclosures

Left at Post Office Suez 2nd December 1869

Reporting Proceedings

Ack.24th Dec 1869.M.335 ?

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Suez, 2nd December 1869

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings No.232 of the 22nd October, I beg you will inform their Lordships that at the invitation of the Khedive I attended the various ceremonies connected with the opening of the Canal passing through from Port Said to Suez in H.M. “Rapid” but refrain from giving any detailed account of that trip as Sir Alexr Milne was present throughout.
2. H.M.S.T.Ship “Malabar” was visited by the Empress Eugenie.  Her Majesty made a most minute inspection of the ship, making enquiries in great detail and asking a large number of practical questions, and she left evidently much struck with the excellence of the arrangements and resolved to endeavour to obtain reforms in that direction in the French Transport Service.
3.Having received the Supernumeraries sent by H.M.S.T.S. “Serapis” as well as those by the P.& O. Mails packet and conceiving that it  is  hopeless to attempt to  reach the Sund heads in time to receive the Duke of Edinburgh I sail this day for Trincomalee whence having embarked stores and clothing for the Squadron I shall go in to Bombay.
4.. The “Daphne” and “Nymphe” were despatched by telegraphic orders to the Persian Gulf in accordance with their Lordships Instructions of 21 Sept M.266 and I have heard from Commander Douglas that the Muscat quarrel has been settled without resort to force and that on the 10th November “all  was going on well”.
5..His Excellency the Viceroy having requested by telegraphic that 3 or 4 small vessels might be placed under the orders of Colonel Pelly the Resident in the Persian Gulf, I have directed that the “Star” shall on arrival at Bombay be held in readiness to join the “Nymphe” and “Dryad” but although I have given directions to the Ships to act in concert with Col.Pelly I have declined placing them under his orders. I  do not anticipate that the services of the …

Page 478

..the “Star” will be required.
6. The “Dryad” was at the Mauritius on the 1st October having carried thither a cargo of slaves given up at Mojanga by the Madagascan authorities. She was about to proceed to Tamatave and thence by Brava to Zanzibar.
7.. The “Dryad” “Star” and “Bulfinch” may be expected at Bombay about this time.
8. The “Cossack” was at the Seychelles on thhe 23rd October 1869.
9.. H.M.S.T.S. “Malabar” sailed on the 1st Instant for Bombay. The French Transport “Tarn” and Gunboat “Bruat” are in port as also the Austrian Gunboat “Harinta”. The “Tarn” brought troops from Saigon losing 40 men on the passage.

I have etc
(Sd) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.
----a Southampton
-------Enclosures--------

1. Acknowledgement of Letter received 13 Nov to 29 Nov 69.
2. Return of Nos. required to complete squadron 30 Nov. 1869
3. Inspection of H.M.S.T.S. “Malabar” 24th Nov 1869
4. List of Vouchers for Incidental Expenses “Cossack” 30 Septr
5. List of Vouchers for  Incidental Expenses “Dryad” 30 Septr
6. Application for expenses (travelling) incurred by Comd Douglas.
7. Application for expenses incurred by Sub Lieut Blennerhasset


Via Marseilles
No.271

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “Columbia” 12th December 1869

That four more copies of “Summary Experiments Pallises converted cast Iron Gun” may be supplied.

Ack.7th Jan 1870 M.No.5

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Off Mocha, 12th December 1869

Sir,
With reference to your letter N.No.311 of 13th Novr 1869 directing me to distribute a copy of the Summary of Experiments “Palliser converted cast Iron Gun etc” I have the honor to request that four more copies may be sent out, so that I may distribute one to each ship under my command.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

Page 481
Via Marseilles
No.275

Forwarded from Bombay per post 1st January 1870

Prevention of Chain Cables from deteriorating in Vessels of the “Nymphe” Class

Ack.2 Feb 70 M.No.23

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea 
Lat 15.25.N Long.52.10.S
20th December 1869

Sir,
With reference to a letter S.T. of the 25th November 1869 from Mr.Girdlestone stating that means should be taken to prevent the Chain Cables of the “Nymphe” class from coming into contact with the copper on the foreport and requesting me to give direction accordingly.

I beg I may be informed if there is any plan known in Mr.Girdlestone’s office by which this may be accomplished.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall.

(Looks like he was a in a good mood on this day – M)

Via Marseilles
No.276

Forwarded from Bombay per post 1st January

Landing of liberated Africans at the Seychelles

Ack.2.Feb.70.M.No.23

H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
Lat 15.10.N
Long 67.51.E
28th December 1869

Sir,
In obedience to their Lordships’ orders conveyed in your letter No.209 of 19th July 1869 I have given directions that liberated Africans are not for the present to be sent to the Seychelles.
2. I have now received the duplicate of a memorial dated 22nd November 1869 from the principal inhabitant of Mahe to their Lordships complaining of that order and urging its reconsideration. The original has doubtless reached their Lordships and I request instruction in this matter.
3..With respect to that portion of the memorial which prays for a continuance of the visits of H.M.Ships to the Seychelles I beg to say that I have never intimated any intention of ordering their cessation as I think the health of ship companies has been promoted during my commission by their sojourn at Mahe in the months of July and August.

I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. S.W.


Page 497

..and eighty right. These were independent of bills in payment of purchased particulars by post.


Accountant General – Submitted 11 Jan 1st 1870. With a request that if this man’s claim is correct then sum --- (dise ?) may be made payable by the Paymaster of the Senior Officers ship present at Bombay

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15 Jan

Bombay 19th Novr 1869

To Commodore
Sir Leopold Heath
H.M.S. “Forte” Suez

Sir,
I herewith take the great liberty of addressing you by letter to bring before your notice a claim I have for 6 months Batta money (donation) for the late Abyssinia War.

I humbly request that you will give this your earliest attention, as I am at present in poverty, and therefore it would be a great godsend to me, if you would forward an order for me to draw the sum and thus render me very grateful. Having been laid on a bed of sickness some time in Hospital with Fever, I was consequently thrown out of work and find great difficulty and no success in finding work again. I was employed on H.M.S. “Octavia” as Ward Room Cooks Assistnt Ealey (?) 9 Oct 1867 No.5 on the list ships book No.504 Discharged 19 Feb 1869. Any letter addressed to me to car of Mr.C.Spradley General Post Officer Bombay will find me. Apologising for the trouble I this give you.

I have etc
(Sd ) Las Legar

P.S. Pray excuse my liberty in sending in unpaid but I am really so very poor. (Sd ) L.Legar


Via Marseilles

No.31
1 Enclosure
P.S. I have confirmed my remarks made in accordance with Para10 --- of the ------ (next page)

Forwarded from Bombay per mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15 Jany 1870

Destruction of a dhow at Keonga by “Nymphe”

Ack 12 Feb.1870 No.28 M.

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 12th January 1870

Sir,
I enclose for their Lordships information the explanations called for in your letter M.318 of the 26th November 1869 on the subject of the destruction of a Dhow by the “Nymphe” at Keonga on 26th March 1869.

Page 498

..to the aforesaid point made by their Lorships, that ---- also required P--- St--- for having given discretionary orders to Officers on detached service allowing the destruction of Dhows under certain circumstances  in ---- of oposition to Art 53 Page 259 of the Slave Trade  Instructions, & I have called attention to these orders in a general memo to the Squadron. It is fair to add that it has in many cases and for many years been unattended to and even Mr.Rothey does not seem --- on its inpaction.

2. The compensation agreed upon by those concerned was paid by Commander Meara as soon as its amount was fixed and before the date of your letter, and it would seem that all that could be done was done by that Officers to repair the error that had been committed.
3..With respect to the special point upon which their Lordships have called for a report, I beg to say I am of opinion that the explanation of Commander Meara is satisfactory. The Certificate in question (Form 6 Page 116) is drawn up with a view to the circumstances of the west African and Cuba Slave trades carried on in docked vessels, which when captured were sent under a foreign master to a port of adjudication and it was therefore necessary that many certificates should be sent for the satisfaction of the Courts, which are valueless where as in the case of captures made on this station, the Captors are themselves always present in Court, the form is however still kept up and in  every one of the very numerous cases on this station, throughout many years past; of the destruction of dhows by boats on detached service, the certificate must have been signed by the Captain, on the strength of the anticipatory orders he had given, exactly in the same way as has been done in the case by Commander Meara.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, S.W.

--------Enclosures---------
Commander Meara’s letter of 5th January 1870


Via Marseilles
No.29
1 Enclosure

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” from Bombay 13th Jan 1st 1870

Explaining proceedings with respect to a Dhow captured by “Nymphe” in Kiswara Harbor

Ack.12 Feb 1870.No.28.M.

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 12th January 1870

Sir,
In accordance with their Lordships orders conveyed in your letter No.258M of 13 Sept 1869 I have called upon Commander Meara “to give full..

Page 499

.. full  explanation with regard to the points referred to in Mr.Rothery’s report (enclosed in your letter) and I called his  attention to the 58,66,69th & 390th sections of the slave trade instructions” I now enclose his reply in which as their Lordships will observe a direct contradiction is given to the  most damaging of the points raised by Mr.Rothery whilst explanations are given of those of less importance.
2. I rejoice to find that Commander Meara distinctly denies the charge of having destroyed any of the papers. The charge is repeated 3 times by Mr.Rothery, twice with hesitation using the qualifying expression “is said to have been destroyed” and “the original having it would  seem been destroyed” but the third time in direct terms “the  Sultan’s pass which the Interpreter had himself assisted to destroy”. If this charge were well founded in the sense in which it is unmistakably made, that is if the papers had been destroyed by the “Captors” with a view to weakening the case of the “Captured” before the Vice Admiralty Court, their Lordships would probably think it right to vindicate the honor of the Service by trying those implicated by Court Martial.
3..Mr.Rothery’s thrice repeated accusation is said to be founded upon Dr.Kirks letter of 22nd May 1869 and its enclosures, I have a copy of the letter, but not of the enclosures. In the letter (which seems very full) there is not a hint at any complaint of the sort and Commander Meara asserts most solemnly that there never was at the trial or at any other time any supposition or complaint that all the papers had not been brought in, and he says, I may therefore assume as a perfect certainty that whatever may have been the contents of those enclosures there was nothing in them of the nature referred to.
4.. In seeking for an explanation of this extraordinary and unfounded most cruel accusation against Commander Meara I have observed the following paragraph in Dr.Kirk’s letter “In court it appeared that this Interpreter cannot read either Arabic or Swaheli, even the Sultan’s dhow pass given to the vessel which he had assisted..

Page 500

.. “assisted to destroy he could not translate”, and this sentence although totally different in real meaning bears so close an apparent resemblance to that of Mr.Rothery “it appeared in court that he could read neither Arabic nor Swaheli, and could not translate the Sultan’s pass which he himself had assisted to destroy” that it is difficult to resist the inference that the one is founded on the other. On the other hand it seems nearly impossible that Mr.Rothery should have made so extraordinary a mistake as to suppose Dr.Kirk’s meaning to be that the pass, and not that the vessel was destroyed, and quite impossible that if  he had so misinterpreted the plain grammatical meaning of the sentence he should not in a matter of such vital importance to the character of an Officer of some standing have looked to the context. It is perfectly clear from the most cursory examination of that context that the pass said to have been destroyed was shewn the Interpreter in Court and that he could not translate it.
5.. I now leave this part of the case in their Lordships hands feeling sure they will see justice done. As it stands. We have 1st Mr.Rothery’s report founded on Dr.Kirk’s letter of 22nd May and its enclosures, 2nd Dr.Kirk’s letter of 22 May in which there is nothing justifying the report. 3rd Commander Meara’s solemn statement that no accusation of the sort was ever hinted at on the trial and that  therefore it is impossible the report can be justified by anything in the enclosures.
6. The remaining objections made by Mr.Rothery are comparatively of little importance in as much as the honor of those concerned is in no way affected by them since they rest principally upon the interpretation of treaties and of their Lordships orders.
7.. Commander Meara states that Dr.Kirk told him in presence of some of his Officers that “he was perfectly right in destroying the Dhow according to his instructions”, and I can bear personal testimony to Dr.Kirk’s having  in conversation with..

Page 501

..with me when I was recently at Zanzibar expressed the same opinion. He considered this case as a test case to decide the question of whether domestic slaves could or could not lawfully be carried to sea, and he stated to me that he thought it was unfortunate that the general question should be decided upon the merits of this particular case because it was one more than usually favorable to the carriers of these slaves in as much as there was a presumption against their being sold when trading to the South which there might not be when trading to the North where they are more valueable as an article of commerce.
8..It is right I should add as Commanding this Squadron that until the receipt of their Lordship’s order of 6th November 1869, I believed it was the duty of every Officer cruising for the suppression of the slave trade to capture vessels having slaves of any description on board. The 51st Art’ of the Instructions seemed to me  most  distinct and as it is well known that a domestic slave is not only a valuable article but an article that is very often sold, I presumed the omission of any definition of the particular quality of slave whose presence in a dhow would justify an Officer “in concluding she was engaged inn or equipped for the slave Trade” was intentional, and I may remind their Lordships that I asked for specific instructions on the subject inmy letter No.93 of 9th April 1869 that in Mr.Olivay’s letter to you of 21st July 1869 it is implied on the third page that having slaves on board forming part of the crew was a legitimate cause of detention and it was not until 6th Nov that their Lordships finally gave instructions forbidding the practice.
9.. With respect to Art.390 of the Slave Trade Instructions I beg to point out that you have not correctly quoted it in your letter No.258M, you have omitted the most important words “if practicable” and Commander Meara states it was not in this case practicable to make enquiries at any Zanzibar port and he might have added that there..

Page 502

..there is no English Consular Officer at any of the Sultan’s port except at Zanzibar itself.
10..I have only to add that I consider Commander Meara to blame for having disobeyed the 66th paragraph of the Slave Trade Instructions but that in all other respects his proceedings were justifiable.
11.. I beg further to refer to my letter No.212 of 22nd September 1869 in which that case is further discussed in reply to yours of 24th July 1869 M.217.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

-------Enclosures----------

Commander Meara’s letter of 5th January 1870


Via Marseilles
No.30
1 Enclosure

Ford per Bombay 15th Jan 70
Ack 12 Feb 1870.No.28.M
Slaves Captured by H.M. “Star”

H.M.Ship “Forte”
12th January, Bombay

Sir,
In my letter No.30 of this days date I have enclosed the report called for from Commander Meara in your letter M.258 of 13th September 1869.

I now enclose that from Commander de Kantzow which was called for at the same time.

2. Their Lordships will observe that the whole of the 134 reputed Slaves (not 60 as quoted from Dr.Kirk by Mr.Rothery) captured by the “Star” in November 1868 were specially examined by the Government Interpreter at Aden in presence of Captain Goodfellow the Assistant Political Agent, an Officer who is himself well skilled in Native language.
3..If Captain Goodfellow failed to discover that these 36 men had been liberated by their masters, it is  not to be wondered at that Commander de Kantzow with his lesser lights should have been equally deceived, and I beg to state my opinion that no blame is  attributable to that Officer.
4. The “Stars” Interpreter was shipped on the strength of a recommendation from…

Page 503

..from the British Consulate at Zanzibar.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, S.W.

----------Enclosures--------
Commander de Kantzow’s letter of  5th December 1869


No.32
Forwarded 12 Jany 1870

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15th Jan 1st 1870
Ack 12 Feb 1870.M.No.28
H.M.Ship “Bullfinch”
Bombay, 11 January 1870

Permission to enter Ward Room Officers Servants

Under the Circumstances I have given permission for the entry of Ward Room Officers servants there being no Supernumerary Marines on the Station.


No.33

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15th January 1870

Reporting having sent a Telegram
Ack.12 Feb.1870 M.No.28

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 12th January 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I this day sent the following Telegram to their Lordships,

“Daphne” boilers broken down. Will take Sixty days and five hundred pounds to make last twelve months at reduced pressure. Will take ninety days and three thousand pounds to make good for three years.

I recommend her going home at once by Canal, Monsoon is favourable, boilers can be sufficiently patched.

“Star” must go by Zanzibar and would take “Daphne’s” Kroomen. (?)

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, S.W.


Via Marseilles
No.34
Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15th January 1870.
Complaint of the incorrectness & unfairness of reports
 on conduct of Officers employed in suppression of Slave Trade.

Ack.12 Feb.1870.M.No.28
H.M.Ship “Forte”
At Bombay, 14th January 1870

Sir,

Page 504

In my letter No.31 of 12th January 1870, I enclosed the last of the explanations called for by their Lordships from Officers of this squadron on account of their conduct in endeavouring to suppress the slave trade during the year 1868 and I hope I shall not be considered over jealous for the credit of the Officers under my command in offering for their Lordships consideration a remonstrance against the general character of the extracts from Mr.Rothery’s reports forwarded to me in your letter M.250 of 13th September 1869 and M.318 of 26th November 1869.
2. I have already referred in my letter No.29 of 12th January 1870 to one special portion of the first named extract but I wish to call their Lordships further attention to the fact of no notice whatever having been taken in Mr.Rothery’s report of Dr.Kirk’s error in asserting that this capture at Kiswara could only be made under permission given by the late Sultan in 1850. Dr.Kirk’s argument as to whether the presence of 10 domestic slaves on board would alone justify a condemnation of the dhow may be stated as follows “I need not discuss whether the capture would be justifiable under the treaty since this is a case under the concession of 1850. The question might be open to argument under the treaty where there is mention of import and of export of slaves but in the concession the term “slave trade” alone is used and no slave trading has here been proved” Dr.Kirk has admitted to me that when adjudicating in the case he was unaware of the existence of Lord Stanley’s letter of December 1866 in which His Lordship then Foreign Secretary claims for the present a general right of search in all the territorial waters of the Sultan under which letter therefore Kiswara becomes subject to the treaty equally with all the ports not between Quiloa (?) and Lamoo.
3..It was surely Mr.Rothery’s business to point out this error since whether Dr.Kirk’s judgement be right or wrong it has clearly been given from considerations apart from those which were…
 
Page 505

..were really at issue.

There is in the report in question one more sentence to which I wish to call attention, viz that in which Mr.Rothery states that the six slaves found on board having been proved to be domestic slaves in attendance on the Merchants, Commander Meara could in reply “only fall back on a single clause in his instructions which specifies the presence of slaves on board as one of the grounds for detaining a vessel”.
4.. Mr.Rothery must be presumed to be kept acquainted with what my be called the current literature of the slave trade and to be therefore aware that this very clause has been a prominent point of discussion during the past year and that so early as March last I officially informed their Lordships that I considered Officers were under it bound to capture vessels having slaves of any description on board. On these grounds I submit that Mr.Rothery cannot be justified in treating the points in so slighting a manner as if Commander Meara had been putting forward something quite absurd and merely as a last resource where as if formed the very pith of his accusations against the dhow.
5.. Mr.Rothery’s entire omission of all notice of that part of Dr.Kirk’s letter in which the mutual difficulty felt on this subject under existing treaties by Commanders of vessels and Judges of Vice Admiralty Courts is hardly consistent with an even handed report and the omission of notice of that paragraph in which Dr.Kirk mentions that Naval Officers work well in a difficult and responsible position seems somewhat ungenerous.
6.. I beg now  to call attention to the following paragraph in the report forwarded to me in M.318 “I must add that this case presents another instance of the irregular and arbitrary way in which the powers entrusted to Her Majesty’s Cruizers for the suppression of the slave trade appear to be too often exercised on the East Coast of Africa”. I think I may fairly reply “This sentence presents another instance of the..

Page 506

.. “the irregular and arbitrary way in which Mr.Rothery dreams up his reports”.  The fact is that considering the large number of captures that have been made during the last three years it is somewhat remarkable that the case on which Mr.Rothery was then reporting is the only one in which there has been anything approaching “arbitrary proceedings” and the irregularities have been confined to those which have been practised for many years, irregularities which I am far from justifying and which have now been checked, but to which Mr.Rothery could hardly have been alluding when he wrote that sentence, but apart from the correctness or  otherwise of the imputations, it seems to me that whatever the nature of Mr.Rothery’s duties  may be it can hardly come within their scope to give an opinion on the past conduct of the squadron when called on to report on an individual case.
7..I hope their Lordships will not think these remarks are written in too strong terms. I have endeavoured throughout to state my case in the most temperate manner possible, but I feel most strongly from the tenor of the opening and closing paragraphs of your Circular of 16th November 1869, and from the tenor of most of the letter recently received from the Foreign Office that there is a feeling that lawlessness is the rule and not the exception in the dealings between Her Majesty’s Officers and the native dhows.
8..It is but natural that reports by a gentleman of Mr.Rothery’s professional reputation should be read as a complete and faithful and just summing up of each case and that where there is a heavy press of other business they should sometimes be the only documents studies. An effect is thus produced and an idea established in the mind of the reader which no subsequent explanation received months afterwards and looked on probably as an excuse rather than a justification will ever eradicate.
9..It is only in this manner that I can account..

Page 507

..account for the feeling to which I have attended because if their Lordships will kindly go through the whole list of accusations and the whole list of explanations they will I am convinced see that the destruction of the dhow by the “Nymphe” boat at Keonga is really the only case requiring severe reproof.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commander

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. S.W.


Via Marseilles
No.85
14th Jany 1870
In reply to --- M.M.No.235 of 4th Decr 1869.

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15th January 1870
Ack 12 Feb 1870.M.No.20
H.M.Ship “Nymphe”
Bombay, 11th January 1870

Lieut 1st  Gooduch forwarding an explanation in reference to a cheque for (pound sign)7.1.9 said  to have been given him by Sub Lieut.Kelham.

I beg to suggest that the cheque be traced though the Bank –


No.36
Forwarded 15th Jany 1870

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Sumatra” 15th Jan 1st 1870
Ack 12 Feb 1870.M.No.28
H.M.Ship “Dryad”
Bombay. 7th January 1870

Acting Lieutenant Henn requests permission to return to England.

Under the circumstances I have sanctioned Mr.Henn’s return to England.


No.37
Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer Sumatra” 10th Jany 1870

Reporting name of Shipwright recommended for advancement.
Ack 12 Feb 1870.M.No.28
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 15th January 1870

Sir,
In reply to your letter No.323 of 1st Dec 1869 I have the honor to inform you that the Shipwrights name referred to therein is Ralph Sobling, and that he passed on the 6th Instant for Carpenter’s Mate.
2. I beg to add that I should regret receiving their Lordships permission to advance this man unless at the same time the Carpenter, Mr.Hawkins can be promoted.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Page 511

Via Southampton
No.41
40 Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Columbian” 22nd January 1870

Forwarding Vouchers for Purchases

Ack 01 March 70.M.No.50

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 20th January 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to forward herewith copies of vouchers for Purchase made by the Paymasters of H.M.Ships on the East Indian Station to the 31st December 1869.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

The Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.


Via Marseilles
No.42
2 Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per Mail Steamer “Columbian” 22nd Jany 1870
Annual report on the Slave Trade for 1869
Ack 8 March 70.M.No.50
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 22nd January 1870

Sir,
In accordance with the 7th paragraph page 11 of the Slave Trade Instructions I forward for the information of their Lordships the following report for the year 1869.
2. The Ships available in the spring of that year for service against the slave traders were the “Forte” “Daphne” “Star” “Nymphe” and “Dryad”. These vessels had all wintered at Bombay except the “Nymphe” which proceeded early to Zanzibar to guard the British community against anticipated troubles from the Northern Arabs and the “Dryad” which had been sent to support the Resident in the Persian Gulf.
3..By the middle of April the squadron was in position as follows, “Dryad” guarding from Ras el Hadd to Kooria Moonia. “Daphne” guarding from Kooria Moonia to Maculla. “Forte” working along the coast between the two. “Star” guarding from “Socotra” to Cape Guardafui and down to Ras Haffoon. “Nymphe from Ras Haffoon to Cape Duinford.
4..The ships remained in these stations..

page 512

..stations until the Monsoon became too strong and after condemning their captures at Aden most of them proceeded to the Mozambique Channel where they were joined by the “Cossack” and the “Bullfinch”. The “Cossack” was left to watch British interests to the southward, and the remaining vessels returned to Bombay in October and November.
5.. The general result of the years works is given in the following abstract. The Officers of the Squadron have shewn great zeal and energy. The total number of dhows boarded including those boarded more than once exceed 400 and these visits were in many cases made in blowing weather and a heavy sea. The amount of slave trading tonnage destroyed is less than last year but the number of slaves liberated is again larger than usual.

Total No. Dhows Captured  Total Tonnage of  Total No. of Slaves liberated.
     Captured Dhows
 32     3431   1117

6. Believing that my visit to Zanzibar in 1868 had produced a good effect I repeated it in 1869 and again discussed the Slave Trade question at a private interview with the Sultan His Highness is I believe personally anxious to stop the export trade but his Government is weak and powerless and I was informed by the Acting Political Agent that in a slaving dhow recently captured were found numerous letters shewing that persons of the highest position in Zanzibar society were interested in her cargo.
7. The trade in the Mozambique Channel as measured by the captures appears to have decreased considerably. A whole cargo landed at Mojanga has been given up to the English Government but I am doubtful whether this act was prompted by the known vicinity to the place of  H.M.S. “Nymphe” or whether it may really be taken to imply that the Government of Madagascar is in earnest in endeavouring to stop…

Page 513

..stop the traffic.
8… On the 14th July a decree of the Portuguese Government abolishing the status of slavery in all Portuguese dominions was published at Mozambique. Under that decree a sort of apprenticeship of existing slaves to their present Masters is to be continued until 1872.
9... What may be called the legislative changes made during the past year have been more than usually important. First in order is the opening of the Vice Admiralty Court at Zanzibar which has given great satisfaction to the Sultan who on my recent visit expressed his confidence in the justness of its proceedings. It seems that its minutes and decisions are reported upon by the Registrar of the Admiralty Court in London. Two of these reports have been officially forwarded to me and I have pointed out in my letters No.29 of 12 Jan 1870 and No.34 of 14 Jan 1870, what appear, in the one, most unfounded statements, and in the other, most unjustified and uncalled for imputations against the general conduct of Officers in command on this station. I suggest that if these reports are necessary they must be rendered by a Committee of three (including a Naval Officer) so that the characters of Officers concerned may not be left in the hands of a single individual giving his judgement in private
10.. The instructions (Act 66 page 25) have for many years fallen into disuse – The Makedahs and  crews of captured vessels have generally urgently begged to be landed or transferred to passing dhows so that  their might the sooner reach their homes and the Captors have generally been only too glad to get rid of them, but the result has been that he vast majority of cases, condemnation in Court has been decided without giving the Judge an opportunity of questioning those who sailed in the dhow. Attention was called by their Lordships in the early part of the year to the necessity of strict compliance with the instructions on this head in future, and I anticipate…

Page 514

..anticipate much good will ensue, not only as ensuring strict justice for the captured but as punishing offending crews by their detention from their homes.
11. A suggestion was made in my letter No.179 of 31 July 1869 for obtaining the services of a better class of Interpreter for the use of the squadron. No reply has yet been received.
12.. On 6th November their Lordships issued “Instructions for the guidance of  Naval Officers employed in the suppression of the Slave Trade”. Those instructions forbid the detaining of vessels having slaves on board if there are attendant circumstances shewing that the slaves are not being transported for the purpose of being sold as slaves, and there is added as an example of the nature of those circumstances “where the slaves found on board are very few in number, are unconfined and appear to be on board for the purpose of loading or working the ship, or attending upon the Master or the Passengers and there is no other evidence that the vessel is engaged in or equipped for the Slave Trade”.
13. I believe that just as it is said a drunkard can only be cured by total abstinence so the slave trade by sea can only be put down if at all by a rigid forbidding of the carrying to sea of any slaves of any description. As I have before remarked even what is called a domestic slave is not only a saleable article but an article which is very often sold, and the return of those embarked to the port they originally left depends solely upon whether or no a good offer has been made for them at the ports they have visited in the interval. I attach (Enclosures No.2) depositions made before me personally by some of the slaves captured by H.M.S. “Forte” as shewing how numerous are the domestic slaves carried to sea for sale.
14. AS to the other class of slaves, namely those purchased and shipped with the direct intention of
 re-sale in other countries, I have to express..

Page 515

..express my fears that so soon as the nature of these instructions become known to the Arab traders they will change their present tactics and send forward small shipments in numerous vessels  instead of full cargoes in a smaller number. To prove the real character of these slaves and the intention with which they are embarked will under these circumstances be very difficult and their Lordships’ Circular shews so much displeasure as to the past and is so threatening as to the future that few Officers in command will take any risk in the matter. I trust their Lordships will not think me disrespectful in thus stating my views of the probable effect of their recent circular. I have had some hesitation as to what was my duty in the matter and I have come to the conclusion in which I hope their Lordships will agree that a report of this sent was an exceptional document which would be altogether worthless if my opinions were not freely expressed.
15.. I have but to add that a year’s further experience has confirmed in me the impressions which I have before reported as to the ineffectiveness of all  that England has as yet done with the intention of suppressing the East African Slave Trade. I believe still as I believed when I made my last year’s report; that the most effectual stop, which could be taken as also the most economical would be to purchase the Sovereignty of the island of Zanzibar where there are already 3,000 or 4,000 Banyans and Hindis,being the most industrious, and well to do portion of the population all owing allegiance to the British Crown, and all under the jurisdiction of the British Consul. The Sultan has built a palace at Darra Salaam possibly with the notion that sooner or later he will have to retire to his dominions on the mainland.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore
Enclosures
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall,  London S.W.


Page 522.

 

Page 522

.. “remain here the “Jumna” having sailed on the 15th. I regret that my official visit to Calcutta has prevented my making the usual annual inspection of that ship”.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London

-------Enclosures---------
Via Marseilles ?
1.- Copy of a Telegram from Comr de Kantzow reporting “Star” having struck on a shoal 17th February 1870
2.- Acknowledgement of Orders, letter –1 to 12 Feby 1870
3.- Professional qualifications of n Lieut Hirlgel 20 In—


No.55
Submitted 21 Feby 1870

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feby 1870
H.M.Ship “Dryad”
Bombay, 4th February 1870

Mr.C.R.Lewis Acting Carpenter requesting confirmation.


No.56
Forwarded 22 Feby 1870
With reference to your letter W.No.240 of 20th August 1869

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feby  1870
Ackd 2 Apl 70 M.No.69
H.M.Ship “Cossack”
Seychelles, 14th Jany 1870
Reporting Mr.Edwd M.Ommaney Asst Paymt has been discharged from H.M.Service at Seychelles.


No.57
2 Enclosures

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feby 1870

Forwarding the original sentence with the minutes of Proceedings of a court martial.

Ack.2 Apl 1870 M.No.69
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 21st February 1870
Sir,
I have the honor to transmit herewith the original sentence with the minutes of the proceedings of a Court Martial held this day on board H.M.S. “Euphrates” for the trial of James Matthew, Acting Chief Boatswain Mate of that ship.
2.- The Prisoner will proceed to Suez in “Euphrates” and then by corresponding Troop ship at Alexandra to England to undergo his imprisonment.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty


Page 523

No.58
Forwarded 22nd Feb 1870
In reply to your letter of 23rd December last No.10376.S.

Forwarded per Mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feb 1870
Ack 2 Apl 1870 M.No.69
H.M.S. “Malabar”
Bombay, 12th February 1870
Respecting the speed of the ship and consumption of coal.


No.60
Submitted 22 Feby 1870
Forwarded per mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feby 1870
H.M.Ship “Nymphe”
Bombay 17th February 1870

Application for --ubes for the Superheaters.


Via Marseilles
No.59
Submitted 22nd Feby 1870 Mr.Warrens conduct and professional character stands very high

Forwarded per mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th Feby 1870
Ackd 2 Apl 1870 M.No.69
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 22nd Feby 1870

Mr.P.S.Warren Asst Surgeon application for appointment to the “Euphrates”


No.61
-- Enclosures

Forwarded per mail Steamer China from Bombay 26th Feby 1870
Prisoners conveyed in Indian Troop Ship
Ackd 2 Apl 1870 M.No.64
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 22nd February 1870
Sir,
I beg to enclose for submission to their Lordships the statements of the Officers commanding Troop ships on this side with reference to your letter M.(without number) of 24th December 1869 in which I am informed that “their Lordships attention has been drawn to the fact that Naval Prisoners in irons have been sent home form the East Indian Station in H.M.S.Troop Ships”.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commander

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.


No.62
Forwarded 22nd Feb 1870 Ship and ------(unreadable)

Forwarded per mail Steamer “China” from Bombay 26th February 1870
Ackd 2 Apl 1870 M.No.64
H.M.Ship “Cossack”
Seychelles, 15th January 1870

Reporting having afforded passage to M.J.Spasholt Missionary and his Wife.


Page 532

Via Marseilles
No.74
1 Enclosure

Forwarded per mail Steamer “Sumatra” from Bombay 12th March 1870
Sanitaria for crews of Indian Troop Ships during Monsoon Months
Ackd 19 Apl 1870 M.81
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 10th Marchh 1870

Sir,
In accordance with the directions contained in your letter M.M.(without number) of  3rd December 1869. I have made enquiries as to the cost of sending sickly men from the Indian Troop Ships to sanitaria, and maintaining them there during the monsoon months and I attach a copy of the reply from the Bombay Government.
I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

---------Enclosure-----------
Report in Secretary to Government letter dated 1st March 1870.


Via Marseilles
No.75
Submitted 10th Mch 1870
As there will be no opportunity for trying this Officer for the Offences complained of by Capt Parish until November or December I forward the case for their Lordships consideration, observing that Mr.Grant was discharged the service by sentence of Court Martial for Drunkenness in January 1860 and subsequently restored… (next page)

Forwarded per mail Steamer “Sumatra” from Bombay 12th March 1870

Reporting the misconduct of Mr.H.H.Grant Asst.Paymr
Ackd 19 Apl 1870 M.81
H.M.Ship “Cossack”
Seychelles, 26th January 1870
Sir,
I regret to have to report to you the misconduct of  Mr.H.H.M.D.Grant Assistant Paymaster whose name has twice been entered in the Log for the following offences.

On the 27th November 1869 I directed Mr.Grant, on his asking me for leave to go on shore, that he was to report himself to me on his return from leave. This he did not do, and on my sending for him after divisions the following morning (he was not at divisions) he was unable to state at what time he returned on board.

On the 7th Instant Mr.G.Liddell Acting Paymaster reported Mr.Grant to me for neglect of duty and on my investigating the case the following morning in the presence of the Senior Lieutenant, it appeared that Mr.Grant had made numerous mistakes on the Record Book, and performed his duty very unsatisfactorily
Page 533
--unsatisfactorily, and also that he was drunk on the afternoon of the 6th Instant. The Chaplain and Surgeon were called, and both stated that they saw him drunk on the 6th Instant in the Ward Room.

I have etc
(Signed) John Parish
Captain

..restored by their Lordships -- -- with loss of  two years seniority

Commodore
Sir L.G.Heath K.C.B.
H.M.S. “Forte”
The district

statements by Captain Parish of the opinion given by the Chaplain and Surgeon seems to leave no doubt as to Mr.Grant’s having been drunk on the 6th January.


No.76

Fowarded per mail Steamer “Sumatra” from Bombay 12th March 1870

Contingent expenses incurred by “Forte” “Cossack” & “Juno”
Ackd 19 Apl 1870.M.86
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay 10th March 1870
Sir,
In reply to your letter M.M.No.21 of the 28th January last, I have the honor to inform you that I approve of the contingent expenses incurred by the “Forte” and “Cossack” but that the “Juno” not being under my command I can give no opinion in her case.
I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.78

Forwarded per mail Steamer “Sumatra” form Bombay 12th March 1870

Alteration in “Daphne’s fittings

Ack 19 Apl 1870.M.81
H.M.S. “Forte”
Bombay, 12th March 1870

Sir,
I beg you will suggest for their Lordships consideration that advantage be taken of the return of the “Daphne” to England to make the following alterations.

1st – To fit a central rear bolt in the deck and special flaps to the Gun slides to allow the 7 inch Guns to be swung round from one broadside (?) to the other. Permission was given for this alteration on your letter dated 30th January 1868 N.No.71 but I have not been able to give effect to it.

Page 534

2nd – To fit the Catheads as in Indian Troop Ships so that the copper under the fore foot may not be torn off when weighing.
3rd - To remedy the dampness of the Magazines and Shell rooms, this is, it is believed, caused principally by the vapour from the Condenser tanks

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles

No.77
24 Enclosures

Forwarded per mail Steamer “Sumatra” from Bombay 12th March 1870

Reporting proceedings
Ack 19 Apl 70 M.81
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 12th March 1870
Sir,
In continuation of my report No.54 of the 19th February, I beg you will inform their Lordships that I left this port for Kurrachi on the 27th February, arriving there on the 3rd Instant.
2.- My object in making this trip was partly to refresh the Ships Company, but principally to acquaint myself by personal Inquiry of the present state and future prospects of a harbor which I have recommended as one which should be frequented during the Monsoon by Men of War which may be appropriated for Indian Government  duty.
2a- Every information was given me on the subject of the harbor works by Capt Mereweth R.E. and I attach for the information of the Hydrographer the latest official notice as to the state of the bar etc. The breakwater from Manora point is begun and will be proceeded with. The perusal of a large mass of official correspondence on this subject has led me to the conclusion that this breakwater, which has been left to the last ought to have been the first work executed, and I believe that when it shall have been completed there will be no difficulty in maintaining a deep water channel through the bar. All accounts agree in stating that Kurrachi is a more desirable residence than Bombay during the Monsoon. The water supply is at  present bad but there are..
Page 535
..are projects in hand for improving it both as to quality and quantity.
3.- Leaving Kurrachi on the 6th Inst I arrived here on the 10th.
4.- On the 4th Instant I received telegraphic information that the “Star” had put back to Galle with an increased leak, and I have found it necessary to dispatch the “Dryad” to escort her to Bombay, where she will be docked before proceeding to England.
5.- On 25th January the “Cossack” was at the Seychelles, her sanitary condition has never been satisfactory, her sick list at that date was but 14, but Captain Parish informs me that weakness and debility are prevalent amongst those who have once been on the list. She will pass the months of July and August in the lattitude of the Mauritius, which will I hope be the means of restoring her Ships Company to health and strength.
6.- H.M.Indian Troop ship “Euphrates” sailed on the 5th Instant for Suez, Captn Cursine has reported to their Lordships the damage done to his ship by collision with the “Batisfamily”.
7.- The “Nymphe” will sail for the South so soon as her new Commander arrives.
8.- “Bullfinch” remains at Muscat
9.- I beg you will further inform their Lordships that the assembly of the Ships of the Squadron at this port during the last 2 months has enabled me to practice those exercises which cannot be carried out by them in the usually isolated condition, small arm men have been landed weekly and under Lieutenant  Reade, Gunnery Lieutenant of the ship, have practiced brigade movements and attained most  satisfactory efficiency. The boats of the Squadron have been weekly exercised in the new fleet maneuvers under the superintendence of Commander Colomb and the younger Officers have much benefited by this instruction. In order to give facility in day signalling to the very inexperienced Signal boys of the small ships, I have issued all orders not necessary to be put in writing by signal, and this service is now carried out with great smartness…

Page 536

..smartness and accuracy. Night Signals were practised for several nights in succession, latterly without mistakes.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.
--------Enclosures----------
1.- Acknowledgement of Orders & Letters received from 19th Feby to 10th March 1870
2.- Numbers required to complete complements to Squadron 28th February 1870
3.- Half Yearly Return of Treasure conveyed by squadron.
4.- Inspection of H.M.S. “Dryad” 23rd Feb y 1870
5.- Inspection of H.M.S. “Nymphe”  24th . . . . .
6.- Inspection of H.M.S. “Euphrates” 25th . . . . .
7.- “Nymphe” passing certificate of Mr.G.T.Craddock for Asst Eng r 1 Class 26th February 1870
8.- “Forte” application from Chief Eng r to be repaid  travelling expenses 18th February 1870
9.- “Cossack” Contingent expenses paid by the Paymaster 31st December 1869
10.- “Dryad” . . . . . do . . . . .do . . .. . 31st January 1870
11.- “Star” . . . . . .do  . . . . do . . . .  31st    …..
12.- “Nymphe” Application from Surgeon to be repaid Travelling expenses 22nd February 1870.
13.- “Forte’s” Periodical Returns 31st December 1869
14.- “Cossack’s” -------do-------31st ------
15.- “Daphne’s” --------do-------31st -----
16.- “Star’s” ---------do---------30th September 1869
17.- “Star’s” --------do----------31st December 1869
18.- “Dryad’s” ------do---------31st ------
19.- “Nymphe’s” -----do--------31st -----
20.- “Bullfinch” --------do--------30th September 1869
21.- “Bullfinch” --------do-------31st December 1869
22.-“Jumna” Punishment Return 31st-----------
23.- “Euphrates” --------do---------31st ---------
24.- “Malabar” ----------do---------31st ----------
25.- Bullfinch” Contingent expenses paid by Paymaster 28th February 1870


No.78
Forwarded 16th March 1870 in replyy to your letter M.No.65 of 25 Jan y last

Forwarded per mail Steamer “Columbian” from Bombay 19th March 1870
Ack d 19 Apl 1870 M.81
H.M.Ship “Nymphe”
Bombay 14th March 1870
Acknowledging receipt of Slave Warrants.

Page 540

No.84
Submitted 22nd March 1870
2 Enclosures

Forwarded through the Post Office at Colombo 3rd April 1870
Ack 20 May 1870 M.98
H.M.Ship “Dryad”
Bombay 2nd March 1870

Requesting the grant of the Human Society’s Medal for a man.


Via Marseilles
Confidential
No.85

Forwarded through the Post Office at Colombo 3rd April 1870

Observations on the report of the Committee on the East African Slave Trade.

Ack 4 May 1870 M.89
H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 10.46 North, Long 75.12 East
25th March 1870

Sir,
I think the most convenient method of complying with their Lordships’ directions contained in your confidential letter M.No.32 of the 17th February 1870, namely to transmit any observations I may have to make upon the report recently given in to Lord Clarendon by the Committee on the East African Slave trade will be to remark upon the report paragraph by paragraph, but as there are two distinct subjects mixed up in the report, viz; recommendations as to the future and accusations against Officers of the squadron under my command as to the past, I will so far diverge from the natural order of the paragraphs as is necessary to keep these subjects distinct.
2.- I cordially agree with the recommendations made in the 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 23rd paragraphs of the report so far as they go.
3.- In paragraph 22 the Committee recommend that the shipment of Slaves for local markets be prohibited between the 15th February and 15th May also between the 15th September and 15th November.  The Committee has doubtless fixed these dates after consultation with Officers of far greater local experience than my self, but the evidence not being attached to the report I am unable to say whether it would cause  me to change my opinion, which is that the 15th August should be substituted for the 15th September.
4.- Paragraph 24. The recommendations in this paragraph seem to me impracticable. English..
Page 541
English Cruizers may capture French smugglers in English waters, but the English Government could not, I presume, delegate that power to Spanish Men of War. So the Sultan may capture foreign vessels contravening his laws in his own waters, but he could give no valid permission to English cruizers to do so.
5.- Paragraph 26. It is right that the Sultan should be urged to make the proclamation recommended in this paragraph, but his Government is so weak and the Slave traders are so strong that they will have but little effect.
6.- Paragraph 27 recapitulating the earlier recommendation of the Committee is a little obscure in the 5th line. It is desirable that the traffic shall be confined to the route from Dara Salaam to Zanzibar, and from Zanzibar to Pemba and Mombasa as suggested in paragraph 21, and that there should be no direct export from Dara Salaam either to Pemba or Mombasa.
7.- Paragraph 30: In addition to the diplomatic action recommended in this paragraph I would suggest communications being entered into with the Turkish Government with respect to Slave Trade in the Red Sea, which I have recently been informed is  very considerable.
8.- Paragraphs from 32 to 48 inclusive contain the Committees recommendations as to the number of Ships and their distribution and it is  to this  part of the report that their Lordships call my particular attention. I very much regret that the evidence upon which the report is based has not been published, because any opinion I may give will be merely that of  an individual, and would perhaps have been materially modified had I seen the recorded evidence of others. With this observation I have to state that I can in no way agree with the opinion expressed in paragraph 36, that with 3 cruizers and 1 steamer launch, “the Slave trade will be effectually checked during the greater part of the year”. I have frequently recorded my opinion that all that England has done for the last 25 years on the East Coast has been of no practical use in the suppression of the Slave trade and..
Page 542
..and now that there is an apparent intention on the part of Government to inaugurate a more vigorous policy, I must earnestly hope that the Squadron will be largely increased. So long as the existing domestic habits in Slave receiving countries remain unchanged, so long will there be more or less of Slave Trade. Those habits can only be changed by completely stopping the supply of Slaves for a very long period probably for a whole generation, and any system which stops short of that will fail of complete success. The trade will be scotched but not killed, and will revive whenever the pressure is taken off. I recommend therefore that at least 10 vessels besides the Flag Ship should be appropriated to this service and since the tactics of the dealers vary with the information they receive as to the position of the cruizers, I would leave the Officer commanding entirely unfettered in his disposal of them. Steam launches of the existing pattern are unsafe for distant cruizing, but even as boarding boats in the immediate vicinity of an anchored cruizer their value is enormous as saving the coal of the cruizer. It would be well worth while, even at the expense of moving the funnels and landing the heavy guns, (retaining the deck fittings) to place the most improved Steam launch on board all ships which are to be employed on this service, and which are capable of carrying them. It would probably be necessary to supply special hoisting in and out gear.
9.- I do not  approve of the recommendation in paragraph 45, to keep Officers longer than 3 years on such a station as the East Coast of Africa, nor do I think the proposal to substitute higher pay for bounties a wise one. I anticipate that the effect of their Lordships Circular Instructions of the 6th November last, “Instructions for the guidance of Naval Officers employed in the suppression of the Slave Trade” will be to diminish the number of captures very largely, and if bounties are withdrawn that number will be still further diminished, and only full slaves, of the condemnation of which there could be no possible doubt will be captured.
10.- Paragraphs 49 to 54 propose to alter  the present..
Page 543
..present arrangements as to Vice Admiralty Courts. It would be well to give the same general powers to Muscat and Zanzibar as exist at Aden, but I see no reason for limiting the number of Courts or assigning to each the adjudication upon capture made within particular geographical limits. Under the Committee’s proposal a Zanzibar dhow might still be adjudicated upon at Muscat, and vice versa and the owner could in neither case appear in person.
11.- Paragraphs 56 to 60 deal with the disposal of crews and their vessels detained on suspicion: The disposal of the  Crews has been already settled by their Lordships. As to that of the vessels, the Committee speak in severe terms of the practice of destroying them and say (Par 60) that when a suspected vessel cannot be taken to a port of adjudication, it is the duty of the Captor to leave her in some secure place to await the trial. There is no such rule in existence and the Committee should have written that paragraph in the further tense in anticipation of their proposal being adopted. I cannot think the proposal itself can practically be carried out to any extent, partly on account of the weakness of the Sultan’s government, but principally because the vessels so detained would in many cases have to wait a full season before their case would be decided and perhaps another before it was made known to them for cruizers could not be kept going backwards and forwards for this special purpose. I think that the legitimate trader has now safeguards which are as much as can be granted to him with safety – 1st The certainty that his crew will be taken in Court – 2nd The improvement in the class of Interpreters, which having been pressed upon their Lordships last year and being now again pressed by the Committee will it is hoped be carried out  - 3rd The personal liability of the Captor and destroyer of a legal trader.
12.- Paragraph 61 to 71 contain proposals for the disposal of captured slaves. To make a depot of freed slaves at Zanzibar, the very centre of the slave trade is a bold, but I think in many respects a wise proposal, and particularly advantageous to..
Page 544
..to the Cruizer as saving the voyage to Seychelles, but to remove the depot from Aden to Socatia or Abdelkuu, without at the same time removing the Admiralty Court, would I think be the reverse. It is of the greatest advantage to our cruizers that their condemned cargoes should at once be taken out of them, and under this proposal they would have first to proceed to Aden for condemnation, then to return with the cargo still on board to Socotia. Aden has the following advantages as a depot – 1st The presence of the Vice Admiralty Court – 2nd An island on which smallpox cases can be isolated – 3rd Constant communication with Bombay. Abdellkuu as a depot was reported against by my predecessor Rear Admiral Hillyar & his report approved by Sir L.Northering Aug 69.
13.- I have no remarks to make on the remaining paragraphs except to offer an that the establishment of Vice Consuls on the Coast (pars 76, 77 and 78) will be of great use to those  engaged in the suppression of the slave trade, but I wish to add that notwithstanding my general agreement with many of the proposals of the Committee, and my belief that if carried out they will make slave trading more hazardous and tend to reduce  its amount, I am yet more and more convinced that the only certain way of stopping the traffic is by purchasing the sovereignty of Zanzibar and thus obtaining a central position from which to work upon the neighbouring coast and ultimately upon the interior of the country.
14.- I have now to revert to paragraphs 44, 45, 56, 57, 59 and 82, in which the Committee alluded in general terms to “many mistakes and improper seizures” made by Officers under my command and in which they specially make two “grave and serious” charges against them.
15.- The Committee have not printed either the evidence on which their report is  founded or the Instructions under  which they were assembled. If those instruction gave them authority to report upon the conduct of the squadron it must most certainly have been their duty to await the replies which..
Page 545
..which had been called for to the complaints made as to that conduct. Had they done so they would have found that the complaints were against individual Officers, and were not like the Committee censure, accusations of the whole body – that in all cases but one, justifying circumstances are alleged by those accused, and finally, that in one case, the most serious of the whole,  the accusation made by a member of the Committee has been proved entirely unfounded, and still awaits an explanation as to the ground upon which it was made.
16.- It is perhaps enough to point to general results in reply to the Committee’s general accusation of “mistakes and improper seizures”. Those results are that 98 cases, involving the fate of 98 dhows, with a total tonnage of 10,667 tons and carrying a total of 2214 slaves, have been brought before the courts at Aden or Zanzibar, during the years 1868 and 1869, and that of those 98 Dhows, one was with her cargo released by the Court, and two were adjudged to have been destroyed improperly, but in one of those cases it was admitted by the Judge (Dr.Kirk) that the Naval Officer was under the letter of his instructions “justified in concluding that the vessel  was engaged in or equipped for the Slave trade, since Slaves were found on board” (page 21 of the Instructions). Out of the 98 cases therefore, there was but one in which blame was attached to the Captors by the Judge.
17.- In paragraphs 56, 57, 58 and 59 the Committee refer with much bitterness to two special points which they term “grave and serious charges”. The first of these two points is “the destruction of Dhows when there is in the opinion of the captaining Officer the smallest suspicion of her complicity in Slave trading”. The practice of destroying guilty Dhows is one that cannot be avoidable under existing regulations, and if I mistake not, I might call Mr.Churchill a member of the Committee) to witness to the impossibility of treating in any other way the numerous captures made by the “Daphne” and “Star” in the autumn of 1860. The sting of the Committee’s censure..
Page 546
... censure lies in their words “smallest suspicion”. Those who destroy Dhows have to give sworn evidence before the Judges and it rests with the Committee to explain whether the Naval Officers have sworn falsely or whether the Judges (Sir Edward Russell, Captain Goodfellow, Mr.Churchill and Dr.Kirk) have condemned prizes on account of the “smallest suspicion” against them. The charge is indeed a grave and serious one. The 2nd point is that of “landing the Crew and passengers of vessels that have been destroyed at some out of the way place, and afterwards obtaining the condemnation of the vessel on ex parte statements”. The Committee state this practice “exists”. This is not true, and the Committee writing in January 1870 must have known it untrue. The practice not of “landing the crew and passengers in some out of the way place” but of allowing them to return to their homes in a passing Dhow, or to land in places whence they know they could speedily obtain passages to their homes, is one of very long standing on this station, It is distinctly against the slave trade instructions, but from its convenience both to captured and captors, and not as the Committee ungenerously insinuate with a view to fraud, it has grown into a universal custom. My attention was called to the impropriety of the practice by their Lordships in a letter dated 12th March 1869.M and since the receipt by respective ships of the Squadron of my general order issued in consequence, no such case occurred.
18.- In paragraph 82, the Committee speak of the “alarm and distrust inspired by the recent proceedings of our cruizers”. Here, as throughout these remarks, I have to regret the absence of evidence laid before the Committee but I may state in contradiction of what may have been told to them, that during the last season, upwards of 100 legal trading Dhows were examined by the boats of H.M.S. “Forte” under my command, many of them by night, and when the presence of the Ship was unknown and that on no single occasion was any alarm or..
Page 547
..or mistrust shewn but the sails were quietly lowered and the boarding Officer was frequently refreshed with Coffee in a most friendly manner. This “alarm and mistrust” exist only in the minds of the Slave traders, who have lost, I am proud to say, through the efforts of the Squadron under my command, upwards of 10,000 tons of their shipping. It is an “alarm and mistrust” which I should wish to see much increased.  I cannot but regret that the Committee should have interpreted throughout their otherwise useful report, these accusations which, (having been already dealt with by their Lordships in a Circular order which they admit they have seen) could lead to no result except that to still further dampening the zeal of Officers employed on this unpleasant service, and exciting still further amongst them a feeling that their motives are misunderstood and that they are unjustly treated.
19.- The report of the Committee has already been published to a certain extent, and I trust that whenever copies may have been sent,  there also, a copy of these remarks may be forwarded, and if the report should be laid before Parliament, I hope Lord Clarendon will allow this  document to be printed and bound up with it.

I have etc
(Signed) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Via Marseilles
Confidential
No.86

Forwarded through the Post office at Colombo 3rd April 1870

Whether 3 vessels allocated for Indian Service could be diverted for
assisting in the suppression of the Slave Trade.
Ack 4 May 1870 M.89
H.M.Ship “Forte” at Sea
In Lat 10.46 North, Long 73.12 East
25th March 1870

Sir,
In reply to the second paragraph of your confidential letter M.No.32 of 17th February 1870, on the subject of the appropriation off 3 of the Men of War proposed to be allotted for Indian Service to the suppression of the Slave Trade during March, April and May. I beg to point out that what ever scheme may be eventually adopted for the Man of..


Page 553
Via Marseilles
No.94
3 Enclosures.
Forwarded through the Post Office at Trincomalee 29th April 1870

Corporal Punishment inflicted by Commr  Goold

Ack 9 June 1870 M.105

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalee, 28th April 1870

Sir,
In accordance with Art.61 page 124 of the Instructions, I forward a report of the circumstance under which Commander Goold ordered Thomas O’Connor AB to be punished on the 11th Instant with 40 lashes during my absence at Kandy on semi official duty with the Duke of Edinburgh and the Governor of Ceylon.
2.- The man refused his punishment at 1.40pm and was flogged at 3.30 on the same day.
3.- The attached copy of my confidential memo to Commander Goold shews my opinion of his conduct. Their Lordships are probably aware of the many good qualities of this Officer, he is an excellent sailor and thoroughly zealous and hard working, but he sometimes shews a want of the calmness of temper and judgement required in those who have to award punishment.
4.- I  hope their Lordships will consider and expression of their disapproval of his conduct to be  sufficient punishment.
5.- I have pointed out to O’Connor the serious nature of the offense committed by him, but I have also thought it right to read to him the memo I addressed to the Commander and I have made a note in the record of conduct book that the punishment having been illegally inflicted, it ought not to stand against him in the award of character or pension, I do not see that more can be done to mitigate the wrong that has been inflicted on him.

I have etc
(Sd ) L.G.Heath
Commander
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

-------Enclosure No.1---------
Reporting a case of Corporal Punishment
H.M.S. “Forte”
Colombo, 11th April 1870

Page 554

Sir,
I have the honor to report that during your absence I punished Thomas O’Connor A.B. corporally for mutinous and highly insubordinate conduct. I had placed W.H.Marandy A.B. in the cells a few days previously for a similar offence and I considered it necessary to punish Thomas O’Connor corporally, as an example to the ships Company, and to check a repetition of such conduct.

I have etc
(Sd ) W.N.Goold
Commander

Commodore
Sir L.G.Heath K.C.B.

I wish to have a detailed statement of the whole circumstances attending this case beginning with a statement of the man’s original offence with the punishment awarded for it.

Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore
25th April 1870
------Sub Enclosure No.1 in Enclosure No.1-------
Memo.
It is my direction in accordance with Art 61 Chap 12 of the Admiralty Instructions that you enquire into the case of Thomas O’Connor Able Seaman accused of mutinous and highly insubordinate conduct and report to me whether you consider him guilty or not.

(Sd ) W.H.Goold
Commander

To S.F.Campbell Senior Lieutenant
C.E.Read Lieutenant
C.P.G.Hick Lieutenant

--------Sub Enclosure No.2 in Enclosure No.1--------
H.M.S. “Forte”
Colombo, April 1870

Sir,
In compliance with your memo of this date. We undersigned find that Thomas O’Connor U.B. was guilty of refusing to carry out the Punishment awarded him, his refusal was in the following terms viz “I cannot carry out this Punishment until I have …
Page 555
..have seen the Commodore

(Sd ) H.Campbell S. Lieutenant
--..—Chas S. Read Lieut’
--..---Charles P.G.Hicks ---..---
Commander W.H.Goold
H.M.S. “Forte”
------------Enclosure No.2-----------
Reporting case of Thomas O’Connor A.B.
H.M.S “Forte”
At sea 25th April 1870
Sir,
In compliance with your orders to give a detailed statement of the whole of the circumstances attending the case of Thomas O’Connor A.B. I have the honor to inform you that on the 8th April at 7pm Thomas O’Connor returned from duty to this ship in the 2nd Cutter and was ordered by Corporal Lambert to fall in with the boats crew on the Quarter Deck to be searched agreeable to orders given specially by myself, finding he would not do so, Thomas O’Connor was reported to the Officers of the Watch who ordered him to be searched immediately and reported to me this man also made an accusation against the which was proved to be incorrect.

On the following morning I investigated the case, and after being fully convinced that the report was quite correct, I awarded the punishment of 10 days No.11 for impeding the Police on duty, the man requested to see the Commodore when his punishment was over. I told him he should do so when you returned on board, but in the mean time he was to carry out my order.

On Monday the 11th April being the first day of his punishment he was mustered at the usual time with the other defaulters and told off with them for work by Corporal Trinworth, which he declined to carry out, he was then reported to Lieutenant Hicks the Officer of the Watch, he would not obey his orders (although quietly advised by him to do so) it was then reported to me that Thomas O’Connor had refused to carry out his punishment, I ordered him to be kept on deck, and 3 lieutenants to enquire..
Page 556
..enquire into his conduct, and report the result in writing and they confirmed the report of the Officers of the watch, shortly after I saw Thomas O’Connor and he informed me that he would not carry out the punishment awarded, I then made him a prisoner and ordered a warrant to be made for Corporal Punishment.

I have the honor to report my reasons for this punishment, namely that it should be an example to the Ships Company and to check such misconduct, there having been eleven cases of insubordination in 4 days and no less than 38 entries in the Defaulters Book and for the following 12 days, after this punishment there are only 10 entries, one of which for insubordinate conduct.

The Cells of the ship being two in number were then occupied one by Robert Hamerton for threatening to strike a Non Commissioned Officer, punished by your order, and the other by Wm, Macardy, for highly insubordinate and mutinous conduct to myself during your absence.  

I beg further to state that in consequence of the great number of charges which have of late taken place in the complement of this ship, having received men and boys from 5 different ships in the Mediterranean, and Ordinary Seaman from the different ships on this station, many of them being of indifferent character to fill the vacancies caused by cases of invaliding and time expired men, has made a very young Ship’s company, and in consequence of the number of cases of insubordinate conduct which have occurred lately and taking into consideration the men as a rule being so young, it was in my opinion necessary to make an example of this man, and as it appears by the decreased number of offences as shewn by the Defaulters Book, to have had the effect it was intended it should have I trust that the motive which led to my punishing this man may meet with your approval.

I have etc
(Signed) Wm.Hy.Goold
Commander

Commodore
Sir L.G.Heath K.C.B.
East Indies.

Enclosures

Page 557

-------Enclosures No.3--------
Confidential Memo to Commander Goold dated 26th April 1870 Vide No.2 Memo Book Page 145


Via Marseilles

No.95

Forwarded through the Post Officer Trincomalee 29th April 1870

Reporting telegrams sent

Ack.9June 1870.M.105
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalee, 29th April 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I have sent the following telegrams to their Lordships.
From Colombo on 13th April ‘Deserting Midshipman “Nymphe” hidden Ceylon propose taking no notice request telegraphic instructions’
From Colombo on the 23rd April ‘If no further instructions arrive from Lordships will try deserters Court Martial Trincomalie’.
From Trincomalie 26th April ‘Sent Commander Parsons Galle’

I have etc
(Sd) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

P.S. The last named telegram was sent in ignorance of that since received from their Lordships that Commander Parsons was to leave England on the 28th April.


Via Marseilles

No.96
2 Enclosures

Forwarded through the Post Office Trincomalie 29th April 1870

Reporting Proceedings
Ack 9 June.M.25 ?
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalie, 29th April 1870

Sir,
In continuation of my report No.22 of 1st April 1870 I beg you will inform their Lordships that I left Colombo on the 23rd Instant and arrived here on the 26th having touched at Galle on the 25th and that the “Galatea” leaving Colombo on the 24th with His Excellency the Governor of Ceylon on board reached this port on the 27th.
2.- The “Dryad” arrived on the 24th from Bombay
Page 558
3.- The “Star” defects having been made good she was to have sailed from Bombay en route to England on the 9th Inst\t
4.- My orders to the “Bullfinch” appear to have  miscarried. On the 29th March she was still acting in the neighbourhood of the Persian Gulf in concert with Colonel Pelly. Her crew was healthy and the weather was not as yet too hot.
5.- The “Teazer” arrived at Bombay on the 20th. She has engine room defects which it will take a week to make good and she will then sail for this Port.
6.- The “Euphrates” and Malabar paid off on the 12th and both ships re-commissioned on the following day.
7.- The “Amorique” carrying the broad pendant of Commodore Gigolme arrived during my stay at Colombo and two French Corvettes touched at Galle, the one bound for Reunion and the other home through the Canal.

I have etc
(S) L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.

Via Southampton
1.- Acknowledgement of orders & letters received to 19th 21st & 26th April 1870
Via Marseilles
2.- Return shewing the dates during which the Squadron has employed in the Persian Gulf Arabian Gulf Red Sea & Bay of Bengal for Quarter ended 31 March 1870
3.- Passing Certificate of Mr.Aylen Mid Galatea for Lieut
4.------do---------Mr.Denien --------do---------
5.-------do-------Mr Curzon Howe ----do------
6. “Cossack” summary of Log 12 February 1870
7. “Cossack” ------do------- 15 March 1870
8. “Cossack” List of Incidental expenses 31st January 1870
9. “Cossack” -------do------- 28th February 1870
10. “Dryad” -------do-------- 31st March 1870
11. “Galatea” -------do------- 14th March 1870
12. “Cossack” Captains and Navn Officers Remark Books 31st Dec 69
13. “Star” Periodical Returns 31st March 1870
14. “Bullfinch” Gunnery Return 31st December 1869
15. “Jumna” Punishment Return 31st March 1870
16. “Malabar” -------do-------31st -------- ---------
Page 559
17. “Malabar” Punishment Return 12th April 1870
18. “Dryad” Periodical Returns 31st March 1870


No.97

Forwarded through the Post Office Trincomalie. 29th April 1870

Entry of a Man of improper age on board H.M.Ship “Star”
Ack 9 June.1870.M.105
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalie, 29th April 1870

Sir,
I have ordered a passage to the Cape and England by H.M.Ship “Galatea” for Robert Hillyar Captain’s Cook of H.M.Ship “Star” left behind at Trincomalie hospital from that Ship.

The man was born in 1811 and entered in the “Star” in “January 1870, is decrepit and utterly worn out and unfit for service. I suggest that Commander de Kantzow be called on to explain his having disobeyed the Instructions at page 90 Art 40 by entering a Man 59 years of age, whereby a considerable expense has been incurred.

I have etc
(Sd )L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.


Accountant General

Forwarded through the Post Office Trincomalie 29th April 1870

Provisions supplied for, but not received by “Hydra”

H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalie, 29th April 1870

Sir,
With reference to your letter of 15th October 1869 on the subject of provisions paid for but not received by the “Hydra” in May 1868, I have to state that I made every Inquiry at Bombay as to what had become of the provisions in but without success.

Captain (then Commander) Barnasdiston was the senior Officer at Aden in May 1869, and I suggest a reference to him. It seems clear from the accompanying letter A that the provisions were shipped in the “Norma” and if so the Contractor is not responsible.

The “Highflyer” left Bombay in May and after..


Page 571

..correct any sums due to them on that account may be made payable to them by Mr. John S. Harper the Storekeeper and Accountant of Trincomalie Dock Yard.

Extract from their Parchment certificates are forwarded herewith.
 
I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

Accountant General
Of the Navy and Comptroller
Of Navy Pay, Admiralty
London. En.


No.115

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie 25 May 1870

Transmitting Telegram

Ack 18 July 1870 M.149

H.M.Ship “Forte”
At Trincomalie, 14th May 1870
Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I this day transmitted the following telegram to their Lordships.

“Think Auvme (?) would probably admit great error attempting twin “Euphrates” with ebb tide until dropped outside all shipping shall I still proceed to Bombay for Inquiry. (?)

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London ..


No.116

Submitted 26th May 1870

Forwarded per Post Trincomalie 25 May 1870
Ack 18 July 1870 M.149
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Trincomalie 16 May 1870

Respecting the case of Eugene Brooke, Ordy: D.to “Teazer” without certificate or cloths from “Royal Adstarde”


No.117
Submitted 26th May 1870
In reply to: your letter M.No.89 of the 15th February 1870

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie, 25 May 1870
Ack 13 July 1870 M.49
H.M.Ship “Teazer”
Bombay, 1st May 1870

Acknowledging the receipt of Slave Trade Warrants.


No.118
1 Enclosure
Submitted 21st May 1870 in reply to your letter of the 18th January last ---D.

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie, 25 May 1870

Ack 13 July 1870 M.149

H.M.Ship “Teazer”
Trincomalie, 17 May 1870

Returning Forms No.211 corrected.


No.119
Submitted 21st May 1870. I have approved of the demand, the curtains being absolutely in the elements.

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie, 25 May 1870

Reply N.S..3900 / 5177 4 July 1870
Ack 18 July 1870 M.149

H.M.Ship “Teazer” at
Trincomalie, 26th May 1870

Application for additional Awning curtains.


Via Marseilles

No.120
1 Enclosure

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie, 25 May 1870

Arab dhow flying French Colors

Ack: 29 June 1870.M.118
H.M.Ship “Forte” at
Trincomalie, 26th May 1870

Sir,
In reply to your letter M.No.70 of the 5th April 1870, calling for my remarks upon Count Daru’s reply to the complaint made by the English Government as to the increase in the number of dhows navigating under the French Flag on the East Coast of Africa and to the allegations that they were sometimes of doubtful character and upon Count Dau’s complaint that a dhow called the “Jamba Ibinsa” under the French colors had been visiting in September last “dans les pasages” of Nossi Bel by the boats of the Stm Ship “Daphne”, I have the honor to state with reference to the first point that Commander Meara’s report (the foundation of this correspondence) was that where 10 dhows with French Colors, and not 5 as supposed by Count Daru, had been seen in 1868, there he had seen 50 or more in 1869. I now attach an Extract from the Journal of Captain Colomb shewing that on 12 days 21 dhows with French colors were seen Either from the “Dryad”..
Page 573
.. “Dryad” or her boats in the same neighbourhood and about the same time of the year and since I saw myself at about that date at least 6 French dhows anchored on Zanzibar Harbour, and since it may fairly be presumed that there were many others besides those 27 being dotted about the different ports on the African and Madagascar coast and at Mayatta and Nosse Beh, it becomes difficult to believe that there is not some mistake in Court Daru’s statement that but 20 dhows received their annual Congi in 1868.
2.- Upon the second point replied to by Count Daru, viz, the allegations that dhows carrying the French Flag are occasionally engaged in Slave trading, I have no further evidence to offer. Commander Meara’s letter on the subject is  very distinct, and it is difficult to believe that the boarding officers of this “Nymphe”, having no interest whatever in the matter, should have reported as stated in the letter that out of 15 French dhows visited on one Cruize there should have been 8 having suspicious circumstances about them, unless there really was some foundation for the suspicion in at least some of the cases, and it must be remembered that these dhows were boarded only for the purpose of verifying the colors, and that not having been searched the suspicions awakened in the mind of the boarding officer could not be followed up.
3.- Count Daru’s argument for the innocence of these dhows from the fact of the English Officers having made no special complaint to the French Local authorities is hardly conclusive, because altho’ it may be presumed that no English Officer would fail to take a French dhow having a full and indisputable cargo of slaves on board into a French port for the disposal of the French authorities, yet such an act strictly speaking would be contrary to the ..
Page 575
..of a strict compliance with this order I future but the “Daphne” having left the station and Captain Sulivans being one of those who seems to have neglected this duty, I am unable to give any information in the case, but it is clear that if by “les pasages” is meant the territorial waters, viz to those within 3 miles of Mosse Beh, then the “Daphne” was greatly to blame, but if “les pasages” is used in the more common and general acceptation of the Expression as the “neighbourhood”, then no legal blame would attach to Captain Sulivan provided he had “legitimate suspicion of  fraud”. The neighbourhood of the French settlement should however have diminished his suspicions, and the Exercise of his right if within sight of the settlement would be most discourteous and unjustifiable, except under extraordinarily suspicious circumstances. I beg to refer to my letter No.121 of this days date on the subject.
I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London
-------Enclosure---------
List of Dhows seen by the “Dryad” or her boats between the 8th and 26th September 1869
------Seen by Ships-------
8th Septr: In Jassandava Bay, 1 Dhow French colors
10th Septr: Off Bojanna Bay, 1 Dhow French colors from Mozambique.
11th Septr: Off Bembaluka Bay, 2 French and 1 Arab.
20 Septr: Off Port Dalirymple, 1 French dhow seen by boats.
8 Septr: Jassandava Bay 2 French dhows
9th Septr: Rermohow River, 1 French dhow
10th Septr: 2 French dhows
12th Septr: Off Nos Jaccain 1 dhow Malagassi – 1 French
14th Septr: Off  Barata, Jassandava Bay- 2 French  dhows.
16th Septr: 1 Dhow Colors not stated
18th Septr: Off Rermahoy Is. 2 Dhows French


Page 576

Via Marseilles

No.121
1 Enclosure

Forwarded per Post from Trincomalie, 25 May 1870
East African Slave Trade
Ack: 29 June 1870.M.118
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Trincomalie, 21 May 1870

Sir,
I beg you will inform their Lordships that during the recent visit of H.S.M.S. “Armorique” at Trincomalie I took the opportunity of discussing the subject of the Slave Trade with Commodore Gisholme who commands the French Naval Forces in these Seas. That Officer is an insnsct opponent of the Slave Trade, but he complains much and I think with justice, of two points of our practice in Engeavouring to suppress it.
2.- The first is that under our treatise with Eastern nations the condemnation of a dhow for Slave trading involves the condemnation of its cargo to whomsoever belonging. The Commodore pointed out with much force that, altho’ an Arab dhow might be perfectly free from all suspicion when a French cargo was shipped, yet such is the avarice of the Arabs, and such their innate propensity to Slave trading that there could be no security against the Captain rendering the cargo liable to condemnation by some petty act of that native whilst on the voyage, and the Commodore said he had reported to his Government that the only safety for his countrymen lay in so multiplying the dhows under their Flag as to  make it unnecessary for French merchants to employ others.
3.- There is a case in point, viz to that of the “Saloma” freighted by Mssr Raband and subsequently condemned for Slave dealing which is still under discussion between the French and English Governments, and there must have been so many similar cases in previous years..
Page 577
..years that I can hardly suppose the question now submitted has not already been discussed, nevertheless it seems so strange that neutral as regards our war with the Slave Traders should be placed in a worse position than would be a neutral in a war between nations parties to the Treaty of Paris of 1806, that I think it right again to have XX it I do so the more readily because I do not see that the abolition of the practice complained of will in any way diminish our offensive powers against Slave dealers. (?)
4.- The second complaint made by Commodore Gisholme was that we exercised our right of visiting dhows suspected of fraudulently assuming the French Flag even in the immediate  neighbourhood of the French settlements, and that this was perfectly unnecessary inasmuch as the French Authorities at those places were above all suspicion, and that being really unnecessary it was discourteous and hurtful to their feelings. He said moreover that our Cruizers had sometimes taken up a position apparently for the express purpose of intercepting and examining the dhows and smaller vessels which maintain the communication between Nosse Reh and the mainland. I believe it not only to be our duty but our interest to avoid a course of  action which without being of any real advantage to  us lays us open to the accusation of being wanting in courtesy and I have therefore issued the attached Memo: to Officers under my Command.

I have etc
S d LG.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London S.W.
--------Enclosures---------
Standing Order, No.78 of 28th May 1870


Page 610

..England for Lieutenant Charles L.Bell, promoted from H.M.S.T. Ship “Euphates” by the P.& O. – Mail Steamer leaving Bombay on the 21st Istant.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.


Via Marseilles
No.162

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S.China” 20th July 1870

Inquiry into collision between Stm.I.Troop Ship “Euphrates” and “Bates Family”

Ack..21st Aug.1870.M.170
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 18th July 1870

Sir,
In accordance with their Lordship’s instructions conveyed in your telegram of the 13 May last, and in your letter No.94, L.M.M. of the same date, I have called to my assistance the two Senior Officers present and we have enquired into the circumstances attending the collision of Stm.I.T.S. “Euphates” with the Merchant ship “Bates Family” on the 28th February 1870, and I enclose our report for their Lordships information.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London


No.163
1 Enclosure

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S. “China” 26th July 1870

Discharge of a boy from H.M.Ship “Teazer” as an objectionable character.
Ack:23 Sep 1870.M.199
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 18th July 1870

Sir,
In forwarding in accordance with the instructions the usual return as to the conduct of a boy named Joseph Burton whom I have ordered to be birched for stealing and then to be discharged as an objectionable character from H.M.Ship “Teazer”, I beg to say that I have thought it right to discharge this boy notwithstanding that his object was ..

Page 611

..was desertion, because it  seems to me that his remaining in the service would be to the detriment of other boys, and that his character is  clearly such that he would if retained be a continual source of trouble.

2.- I wish to call their Lordships attention to this boy’s case, and  respectfully to suggest that it would greatly benefit the discipline of sea going ships, if objectionable characters were more carefully weeded out from amongst the boys in the Training Ships. If Joseph Burton had been flogged and discharged when brought back to the “Implacable” after his third desertion, instead of having been promoted to the 1st class, the “Teazers” punishment list would have been much reduced.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London


No.164
Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per P.&O.S. “China”. 20th July 1870

Forwarding reports of Survey on Invalids
Ack.22 Sept.1870.M.99
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 19 July 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to transmit herewith, duplicate Reports of Survey held on Officers and men of  Stm Ships on the East Indian Station.
2.- The persons named on the other side hereof will proceed to England tomorrow per P.& O. Steamer, the men at the rates agreed upon by their Lordships, as notified to me in your letter “I.D.India” of 21st 1870, which the Agent here has agreed to Extend to Seamen of the fleet.
3.- The remainder of the Invalids will be disposed of as recommended by the Surveying Officer.
4.- B.Nugent will be placed under the special care of Sargeant Jackson.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall
London. S.W.


Page 614

Down in the Admiralty charts, having been supposed to be slightly out of position. I directed Hm.I.T.Ships to verify the true position of these Islands when an opportunity offered, and I beg to transmit herewith the reports from the “Euphrates” & “Jumna”.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London


Via Marseilles

No.166
1 Enclosure

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S. “China” 20th July 1870

Forwarding Report of Survey on an Officer

Ack.24 Aug.1870.M.170

Stm Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay 19 July 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to forward, herewith, a Report of Survey held on Lieutenant Ernest B.Wadlow, of H.M.I.T.Ship “Euphrates” as directed in your letter L.No.100 of the 31st May last.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To  the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.  SW.


No.167
1 Enclosure

Forwarded per Post from Bombay, 26th July 1870

Boarding French Dhows in the Vicinity of Bosse Beh by the boats of H.M.Ships
Ack.23 Sep.1870.M.199
“Forte” at Bombay
21st July 1870.
Sir,
I enclose for their Lordships information an extract from a private letter dated the 10th June 1870, from Commodore Gizolme to myself having reference to that part of my letter No.120 Par:5 of the 20th May last, which refers to a complaint made by Count Daru, of the boarding of a French dhow in the neighbourhood of Nosse Beh by the boats of an English Man of War.
2.- The searching of French dhows, where papers have been examined and found in order, being distinctly forbidden by their Lordships…

Page 615

..Lordships instructions, I beg to suggest an Inquiry be held on the conduct of the Officer commanding. The “Daphne” was at the date mentioned under the command of Captain Sulivan.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London.

Ref. The Commodore informs me further that there were in 1869, 60 Dhows having the right to fly French Colors. This subject was also referred to by Count Daru in the letter referred to.

----------Enclosures-------
Extract from a letter of Commodore Gizolme to Commodore Sir Leopold G.Heath K.C.B. dated 10th June 1870.

“En feulletant mes papiers J’ai trouve une depeche de Mayotte relative a l’affaire du bontre “Tainte ibina”. Ce boutre queique partant fuvillon francaise le ayant des papiers parfaitement in riegle n’en avait par moins ete vinte de fond en comble par unn creiseru Anglaism mais c’est par le “Daphne” et non par la “Nymphe” ansi que ella parait resulter d’un rappor du Capitaine de la goislette francaise la “Gilberte” qui est un homme qui merite confiance. Le Capitaine navignait dans les mienso pasages que toutre et il termine son rapport ainsi”

le 10 September 1869 au matin, J’appareillai avant le jour, au soleil level, j’apperous les deuse embarcations (celles que avisit visite le  boutre) devant moi avec pusillon francais guilles ont amene que a I’ai ite tres pisi d’illes pour le remplacer par le pavillon Anglais. A monillies a 3 heurs de l’aprise --- a --------., les embarcations a terre et je vu plus disc--. Anm du Navir, car les hommequi ont --- ord---ansment le nom a leur bonnet ar--- setire --- rabans. Ces embarcations etait ---- en ---. Les bordis du haut galliportso  --- un arrdon blue an dessous. La plus petite petant d--- un suasson avvie la  lettre D. (as much as I can work out M.)


Page 620

Via Marseilles
No.173
2 Enclosures

Forwarded per Post from Bombay 2nd Aug.1870

Forwarding the original Sentence with the
minutes of the proceedings of a Court Martial

Ack.23 Sept.1870.M.199

H.M.Ship “Forte”, Bombay
1st August 1870

Sir,
I forward herewith the original sentence and minutes of the Court Martial held by their Lordships orders on Commander Goold.
2.- The offence committed by that Officer came without doubt under the 28th Article of War, but considering his former services, I was of opinion that the only sentence applicable under that Article would be too severe and therefore in accordance with the Instructions of Par5 in their Lordships’ Circular letter of the 12th November 1869, numbered to me 308, I made the charge under Article No.17.
3.- Commander Goold’s written defense consists partly of legitimate attempts to excuse, or justify his conduct, but principally of attacks upon the general discipline of H.M.Ship “Forte”, and of complaints that I had not afforded him proper support but had listened to appeals made against the punishments awarded by him.
4.- I felt most strongly that if the charge were proved, there could be but one possible justification of Commander Goold’s conduct, vic, that between the 7th April (being the day of my leaving the ship) and the date of the flogging viz, the 11th April, there had been some extraordinary outbreak or threatened outbreak amongst the Ship’s Company, and I felt that any evidence as to the state of discipline of the Ship before the 7th April was perfectly useless in this trial, and therefore when the Court decided to receive evidence on this  point between the day of my joining the Ship and the day of the flogging I entered a protest against the decision.
5.- I believe the Court adopted their views under the feeling that any irregularity was better than allowing the prisoner to suppose himself unjustly hampered in his defense but..

Page 621

..but the result has been that throughout the d—the point of the prisoner’s questions to his witnesses was to attack me or the discipline of the ship, rather than to extenuate his own proceedings, whilst in my cross examination of his witnesses I was obliged to address myself principally to defending my own character as a disciplinarian or to  defending the general character of my Ship’s Company.
6.- I do not think I have any reason to regret the result, the evidence of the Senior Officers of the Ship is  very plain, especially that of the Gunnery Lieutenant, whilst the adverse evidence is  almost confined to a statement of slackness in clearing the lower deck on the  part of two aberrant Officers, one of whom shewed himself perfectly unworthy of belief, and to similar statements on this point of the  Master at Arms and a Ships Corporal of 4 months standing.
7.- Several individual cases of misbehaviour by individual men were referred to by Commander Goold, but in all those cases, as well as in that of the complaint of the Chief Petty Officers, indeed in every single special case brought forward, it was proved under the cross-examination that proper punishments had been awarded, and proper steps taken and so far as those cases prove anything, they prove the ship to have been firmly and properly ruled.
8.- Commander Goold made a special point of my having allowed appeals to be made  against his punishments.  I hold most distinctly that such appeals ought never to be openly stopped , but I hold also that if they should be made in such numbers and so constantly as to make it apparent that they were put forward merely on the speculation of  getting a smaller punishment, and without any real sense of injustice on the part of the applicant, it might then become the Captain’s duty to check the custom, by adding to the original punishment in cases where it turned out that such was the motive of the complainant. I assure their Lordships, having that..

Page 622

..that there has been nothing of the sort on board the “Forte”. The accusation has been made in more wantonness. The prisoner’s own witnesses would neither of them swear that there had been more than 12 such appeals, and although I do not pretend to remember all the cases, I really believe the total number has not exceeded 9 or 10 during the period of my command up to the date of O’Connor’s case, and I may add the Commander’s award was almost always confirmed, indeed his own witness, the Master at Arms, could only remember one occasion where the punishment had been reduced.
9.- I hope their Lordships will think with me, that  the “Forte” has come very well out of a somewhat trying ordeal, viz, that of being picked to pieces by a man who knows every incident in her history, and who has had six weeks in which to get up his case.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. SW


No.174
8 Enclosures

Forwarded per Post from Bombay 2nd August 1870

Reporting Proceedings

Ack.2 Sep.1870, M.199
“Forte”
2nd August 1870

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings No.165 of the 19th July, I beg you will inform their Lordships that  H.M.Ship “Nymphe” arrived here  on the 24th ultimo.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty.

---------Enclosures----------
1. Acknowledgment of orders & letters received
2. Return of Appointments etc
3. Return of Nos. required to complete squadron.
4. List of Incidental Expenses, “Bullfinch”, May 1870
5. --------do--------- “Nymphe”, 26 June 1870
6. Punishment returns, “Euphrates”


Page 634

..I have the honor to forward herewith the “Report of an Inquiry into the Conduct” of an Ordinary Seaman whom I have ordered to be discharged from the service as an objectionable character, so soon as his term of Imprisonment shall have expired.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, ..


No.178
1 Enclosure
(copy of charter to …)

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S. “Baroda”, 10 Aug 1870

Relief of Troops at Labuan

Ack. 23 Sep 1870 M.199

H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 2nd August 1870

Sir,
In further reference to their Lordships orders to assist the General Commanding in Ceylon in his arrangements for relieving the Garrison of Labuan, I have to report that since my arrival at the Port I have received a telegram from that Officer saying he was still without the means of transport. I immediately communicated with Sir Seymour Fitzgerald, urging strongly the loan by the Bombay Government of a Bombay Marine Ship, on the conditions of all expenses of establishment and of every other description being paid for. His Excellency, however, after some days delay expressed himself unable to lend one, and I have obtained, by public advertisement, the use of a very good ship, the “Burmah”, at a rate per head which is about equivalent to 19 rupees per ton per month.  The Charter Party will be lodged with the General in Ceylon. The “Burmah” will leave on the 3rd instant. I regret the delay which has occurred in this matter. I gather that it has arisen through lengthened negotiations between the Ceylon & Bombay Governments as to the use of a Bombay Marine Ship. So far as I am concerned I was unable whilst at Trincomalee to do more than give advice: I left that port believing all --- arranged, and since my arrival here I have not lost a day.

Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty


Page 625
Via Marseilles

No.179

Forwarded from Bombay par P.& O. S. “China” 17 Aug 1870

Advice of Telegram

Ack 20 Sep. 1870 No.199

Hm.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 12th Aug 1870

Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I have this  day transmitted the following cypher telegrams to their Lordships:
1208, 833, 2154, 468, 1996, 7252, 6608, 12153, 7548, 3914, 2617, 5091, 9567, 8149, 3277, 4225, 4713, 12582, 5326, 12189, 829, 4963, 5737, 6196, 12155, 8733, 6031.

I have etc
Sd  L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
London S.w.


No.180

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S. “China” 17 Aug 1870

Disposal of Steam Launch No.11

Ack.25 Sept 1870.M.199

H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 12th August 1870

Sir,
In reply to your letter D 1400 / 2112 No.130 of the 19th ultimo, I have the honor to inform you that the “Octavia’s” Steam Launch (No.11) left Bombay on board that Vessel on the 12 March 1869, the day on which the “Octavia” sailed for England and that I have no information respecting the Launch subsequently to that date.
I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. S.w.


Via Marseilles

No.181
2 Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.S. “China” 17 Aug 1870

Reporting Proceedings

Ack 23 Sept 1870.No.199
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 14th Aug 1870.

Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings, No.174 of the 2nd instant, I beg you will inform their Lordships that the distribution of the squadron remains unchanged since my last report.


Page 627

Confidential
Via Marseilles

No.183

Forwarded from Bombay, 17 Aug st.1870 per P.& O.S. “China”

Temporary measures for defence of Bombay

Ack 20 Sept.1870.M.199

H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 16th Augst 1870
Sir,
I beg you will inform their Lordships that at the request of Sir Seymour Fitzgerald I yesterday joined His Excellency with Sir Augustus Spencer the Commander in Chief, and Major General Tramenhure of the Royal Engineers, in consultation as to the temporary measures which should be adopted for defending the harbour at Bombay.
2.- The result of the discussions was that Four 9in: guns and Two 13in: mortars, One 9in: gun, and Two 110 tors: on the Middle ground; and various small batteries of 69 Pors: and 56 Pors: on the reclamations near the Apollo Buner.
3.- Sufficient 9in: guns can be obtained from Calcutta, but Inquiry has to be made as to whether the carriages and projectiles have yet been sent out.
4.- Engineer instructions will be asked for from Chatham to teach at Bombay the most approved methods of manufacturing and working torpedoes.
5.- Hope were expressed that pending the completion of the “Magdala” and “Abyssinia” an ironclad would be sent through the Canal for defensive service at Bombay. I beg to urge the carrying out of this arrangement and as the Canal is not protected by international treaties, and is therefore liable to be temporarily blocked up by any belligerent whose ends would be thereby served and who was careless of the risk of a rupture with Turkey, the vessel should be sent out with as little delay as possible. Presuming that the “Enterprise” will have been sent to give support to the Commandant at Aden on carrying out Lord Granvilles instructions as to Foreign..

Page 628

..Foreign Men of War in English ports, I have only further to call attention to the necessity of stationing, if future political complications should arise, an Ironclad  at the Mauritius, where no heavy guns have as yet been mounted.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. Sw.


Via Marseilles
 
No.184
4 Enclosures

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.S. “China” 17 Aug st 1870

Forwarding report and minutes of Court of Enquirey

Ack: 23 Sept 1870. M.199

H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 16th Aug st 1870
Sir,
I beg you will you will inform their Lordships that on the return of Hm Ship “Nymphe” to Trincomalie in May last, I soon became aware of the existence of serious differences between her Commander and 1st Lieutenant.
2.- Lieut. Chapman had originally been 2nd Lieut: of the “Nymphe”, but at the request of Capt: Burnadiston, then in Command, he became 1st Lieut, when Mr.Bromiton invalided. He has remained in that capacity since the --- of 1868, under Commanders Barnadiston and Meara & acting Commander Campbell, and although I have always understood he was not a good 1st Lieutenant, he has borne the character of a thoroughly sober well conducted and well meaning officer.
3.- Commander Wells joined the “Nymphe” in March 1870, and he as but a few days in company of the “Forte” before he returned to Trincomalie as mentioned above.
4.- Two formal complaints were made to me  whilst at Trincomalie by Lieut Chapman of his Commanders treatment of him. The first was withdrawn by mutual consent, but not until I had intimated my intention of personally investigating the matter in dispute. In this case, so far as I could judge without having taken evidence, Commander Wells was to blame; and the second complaint is..

Page 629

..in which the 1st Lieut: seemed in error I replied by a Memo: dated June 4th, pointing out where he was wrong.
5.- The “Nymphe” left Trincomalie in company with the “Forte” on the 9th June, but as  after the first and most serious of the complaints has been withdrawn I had seen Commander Wells in presence of  Lieut: Chapman, and received mutual and most solemn assurances that every difference was completely settled, I hoped that for the short  remaining period of the “Nymphe’s” commission matter might go smoothly, and I thought this  the more likely because Commander Wells informed me that there  was a close and intimate friendship between the families of himself and Lieut: Chapman respectively.
6.- A day or two after the arrival of the “Nymphe” at this port I received the accompanying letters marked 1 and 2, and in presenting them Commander Wells described verbally conduct on the part of Mr.Chapman of such a nature as in my opinion to require a Court Martial. I then sent the memo: marked 3 to Commander Wells and  as he declined to prefer charges I ordered a Court o Inquiry, whose minutes and report I now forward for  their Lordships information.
7.- I thought it desirable that the state of the “Nymphe” should be thoroughly looked into, and my thanks are due to Captains Furme ? and Douglas for  the patience & perseverance thy have shewn. It was necessary to place some limit to the range of the Inquiry, and I thought sufficient information could be obtained by fixing this at the 4th June, the date of my memo” on the last complaint previrsio to the present one.
8.- I have no hesitation in stating my opinion that,  notwithstanding the pluck and courage shewn by Commander Wells on former  occasions, as recorded on some of his attached Certificates, and notwithstanding his earnest zeal and good intentions in his efforts to bring the “Nymphe” to what he considers..

Page 630 is page 628 on the computer disc

Page 638 (may be Page 630)

Considered a better state of discipline, he is evertheless so wanting in temper and discretion as to make it unadvisable he should remain in Command. The Surgeon of the “Nymphe” informs me he is about to bring  him forward for invaliding, and if, as I anticipate, the Surveying Officers should order him home, no further steps will in my opinion be necessary in his case. Their Lordships will be informed by telegraph of the result of the Survey.
9.- I think it unnecessary to extend this letter by comments on the evidence brought before the Court, but I wish to state that under the circumstances of the case I have taken no formal  notice of the conduct of  Mr.Eden.  I shall probably express my opinion to him verbally when I next inspect the ship. Mr. Hirtzelo remonstrance to his Captains upon his deliberately awarded punishment to Mr.Davis, will probably be treated similarly.
10.- On the whole I do not think Mr Chapman to blame, he has been placed in circumstances of great difficulty, and it is not easy to  say what his exact  line of conduct should have been on each occasion. I consider however that after this inquiry and its disclosures it will be better  that he should be removed from the “Nymphe”, and I  am about to exchange him into another ship.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore

To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London. Sw.

--------Enclosures-----------
1.- Commander Well’s letter forwarding Mr.Chapman’s application for supersescion ?
2.- Lieut: Chapman;s letter requesting to be ---------
3.- Memo: to Commander Wells to prefer charges against Lieut: Chapman.
4.- Order for Court of Inquiry with the report and minutes of the Court.


Page 652
-----------Enclosures------------
1.- Acknowledgement of orders & letter received.
2.- Periodical returns, “Forte” 30 September 1870
3.- Periodical returns, “Nymphe” 30th September 1870
4.- Periodical returns, “Teazer” 30 June 1870
5.- Punishment returns, “Malabar”, 30 September 1870
6.- Incidental expenses, “Nymphe” 1 October, 1870
7.- Application for repayment of travelling Expenses Mr.R.Anderson, Chief Engineer of “Nymphe”.
8.- Return of -------th “Teazer”  ------ 1870


No.226
Forwarded per P.& O. Steamer “China” from Bombay, 16th Oct 1870

Punishment of Robt Hamerton, ---- of “Forte”

H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 15th October, 1870
Sir,
With reference to your letter L.M.M.No.193 of the 12th September 1870, acquainting me with their Lordships disapproval of the course pursued by me on the punishment of Robert Hamerton, whose case was reported in my submission No.116 of the 7th August, I beg you will express to their Lordships my regret that I did not explain the circumstances more fully at the time.
2.- It was in the first place my intention to bring Hamerton before a Court Martial and the charge was actually drawn up, the witnesses were warned, and the Commander had been directed to hold himself in readiness to prosecute. I abandoned that intention upon the arrival of the Ship at Bombay from the consideration of the impending trial of the Commander himself, and from having been informed that it was supposed the Commander intended to call the Police as principal witnesses in his own defense. I was  at that time aware that the head of Police was very obnoxious to the Ships company generally, but I  did not know with certainty to what extent the feeling existed towards his subordinates, and I thought it would be better for the Ship ---

Page 653

..this being a case in which the Police were directly affected, to settle it ------ly myself rather than bring it before the same  Court martial as that which would have tried the Commander, and at which I thought it possible the general  conduct of the Police might come under discussion and the hostile feelings  between the Police & ships company (supposing it to have  existed) might have been exasperated.
3.- With reference to the last portion of your letter which you inform me that their Lordships consider that failing a Court  Martial  I should  have awarded a more severe punishment; I respectfully submit that although I might have ordered discharge with disgrace instead of discharge as objectionable, I could not consistently with their Lordships orders act Summary Punishments have awarded any more severe punishment than that actually inflicted, viz, 42 days imprisonment with hard labour. This is the maximum punishment allowed for mutinous or highly insubordinate conduct when imprisonment or gaol is possible, and I regret much that their Lordships should think that by awarding it with subsequent discharge to Hamerton I have “Encouraged others to act as he acted”.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
London, Sw.


No. 227
Forwarded 1st Oct 1870. With refer to the Survey Report of Steamship “Cossack” for the half  year ended 31st December 1869 forwarded herewith.

Forwarded per P.& O. Steamer “China” from Bombay, 16 Octr 1870
H.M.Ship “Cossack”
Mauritius,, 6th Sept 1870

Reporting result of Survey on Dean and Adam’s pistols.


Page 663.

“Forte” 18th Oct 1870
Approved and forwarded for the information of the Medical --- &the Navy in camp that xxxx ----------

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.S.
28th October 1870
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay,, 15th Octr: 1870
Sir,
I have the honor to represent to you that I consider it necessary during the excessive heat at present in Bombay, that Mr.H.N.Wyatt ? your secretary should proceed to some  hill station until his departure for England. He is at present suffering from excessive debility caused by long residence in this climate, and I strongly advise his proceeding to Matheran.

I have etc
S d Lord Macklyston M.D. ?
Surgeon
Commodore
Sir Leopold G.Heath K.C.B.
H.M.Ship “Forte”


No.230

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.S. “Columbian”, 30th October 1870

The Late Court martial on Commander H.H.Goold
H.M.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 29th Octr 1870

Sir,
With reference to your letter L.M.M. No.203 of 23rd September, on the subject of the Court martial lately held upon the conduct of Commander Goold, I beg you will inform their Lordships that I felt a difficulty in wording the charge against that officer in the manner pointed out by their Lordships partly because under their Lordships Instructions, Art 61, Page –14 the case of open mutiny is excepted from those where a Captain is directed to appoint either Officers to inquire into the particulars of the case, but principally because in Commander Goolds letter to me dated 11th April 1870 (which is attached to the minutes) he himself states he punished O’Connor for “mutinous and highly insubordinate conduct”, and I thought it fair to make the charge in his own words.
2.- I have been in much doubt as to whether their  Lordships wish me to communicate to the President of the Court ?the substance of the 3rd and 4th paragraphs of your letter, but in the absence of distinct instructions…

Page 664

..instructions I have refrained from doing so.
3.- The 5th and 6th paragraphs of your letter have given me much pain.
4.- I most fully admit that on hearing Commander Goold’s defence read I did feel very indignant.  Commander Goold had been on most intimate terms with myself up to the date of the receipt of their Lordship’s orders to try him by Court martial; - on terms of such intimacy that I am quite sure he would have let me know if he felt in the slightest degree aggrieved by anything I may have done, or if he had felt that he did not receive proper support from me. It is my habit to see the police cases every day at 11.am, and it was a most common occurrence that when the cases had been adjudicated upon and dismissed, we should talk them over again whilst walking together by ourselves.. There was thus most ample opportunity or him to have stated his dissatisfaction with my decisions if he had felt any, but I assure their Lordships that he never gave me the slightest hint, or in any way led me to suppose that he was not Equally with myself perfectly satisfied with the condition of the ship.
5.- I have considered if necessary to good discipline that the Captain should make a friend, at least so far as service matter are concerned, of his second in Command, and I believe that I had success in doing so with Commander Goold, and on such good terms were we that when I was about to report to their Lordships the occurrence for which he has  since been tried, I shewed him the letter before sending it, saying that I thought notwithstanding all I could say their Lordships would supercede him and it was better for him their Lordships should see I had not overlooked the gravity of his offence, than that I  should attempt to make light of it. He thanked me most warmly, admitting his error, and spoke…

Page 665

.. of the strict and severe school  of  discipline in which he had been brought up, but not even then did he allege anything against the general discipline of the Ship, or hint in any way at a want of support from me, and therefore when I found him adopting a line of defence which could not by any possibility clear him of the charge made against him, a line of defence which I knew could not be supported  by evidence, but which when read by the Public (the prisoners ‘friend’ was the reporter of a local newspaper) would tend to discredit myself and the Officers and crew of the “Forte”, I felt that his conduct was both ungrateful and dishonest.
6.- I admit to their Lordships that I was under the impression which I have  endeavored  to describe above, when the witnesses for the defence were called, and that  I considered that I had thenceforward the double duty, not only off watching the effect of the evidence on the charge, but also of watching its effect on my own character as an Officer, and on that of my Officers and Ship’s Company; but I have, since receiving your letter, gone most carefully through the questions put by myself to the witnesses, and with the exception of two put to Mr.Hicks, Sub Lieut, the first beginning with “The Prisoner considers it a crime for a man who has been judged by me, etc, etc,” and the other with “The Prisoner has stated that I failed to support him as Commander of the Ship, do you think, etc, etc,” – there are none for which I can take blame to myself, or which I should wish now that I had not put as being of a recriminatory nature. I made  two other remarks which have perhaps been misunderstood, the first to the President, to the effect that the Prisoner was putting a question which, if answered in the affirmative might cause another court martial; the second, when the Prisoner was attempting to impinge the well known rule that you must not attack the veracity..

Page 666

..veracity of your own witness if he gives an answer the contrary to what you expected. I regret the first of these remarks as doubtless it was the President’s and not the Prisoner’s duty to have made it.
7.- I feel that I should be unworthy if the trust their Lordships have hitherto placed in me if I had  condescended to recriminations with Commander Goold. I considered it my duty in the conduct of this trial.
1st. To prove the charge I had put forward, and
2nd. To cent…. What I believed to be unjust and untrue accusations against myself and against the Officers and Ships Company of H.m. Ship “Forte”, as put forward by the Prisoner in his defence, and I most deeply regret that their Lordships should consider I have in doing so descended to personal recriminations, and I earnestly hope their Lordships will not think me wanting in respect for their decision in submitting to them the above attempt to justify myself in so far as regards their strictures upon my conduct with reference to the Court Martial.
8.- the 6 para of your letter refers not to the Court martial, but to my covering letter in which I forwarded the minutes of its proceedings. In this cases it is my duty simply to accept their Lordships decision, and to express my regret that I should have used language which in their Lordships opinion is “unusual from an Officer in Command of a Squadron of Hm Ships when addressing the Board of Admiralty”, but I wish at the same time to state that in writing these words I merely wished to express plainly, what I felt strongly, and I had not the slightest idea that the turn of the expressions used was, or would be considered improper.

I have etc
Sd L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, Sw.


Page 667
No.231

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. S. “Columbian” 30th October 1870

Closing of Medical Establishment at Trincomalie
H.M.Ship “Forte” at
Bombay, 25th October 1870
Sir,
In accordance with their Lordships Instructions contained in your letter L.160 of the 8th August 1870, I have directed the return to England of Dr.Gray, late of Hm.Ship “Forte” for service at Trincomalie Hospital, and ---- ---- the Sick Bay Steward.
2.- I have directed further that, “The Hospital Room is to be Sub-Storekeeper & medical Stores under Mr.Harper, and he is to keep the Hospital and premises in good order, and to attend, with temporary assistance when necessary, upon patients in Hospital, His pay is to be raised from the day Dr.Gray gives up charge to 1/0 per day.”
“The Hospital Coolie is to be returned at his present pay of 1/6 per day.”
3.- And as it appears from a communication received from the Naval Storekeeper that the Officers of the Yard and their families as well as the Established workmen have always received medical attendance at the public expense, I have directed the fixed annual payment of 8 days full pay, suggested in my letter No.143, to be paid to Natives now on the Establishment, but not to fresh entries.
4.- I now request that their Lordships will make such arrangements as may be  proper with the War Office for ensuring medical Attendance being given to the Officers of the Yard and their families by the Surgeon of the Garrison.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, Sw.


Page 668
No.232
Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. Steamer “-allora” 6th November 1870

Captain Relief Fund
Hm.Ship “Forte”,
Bombay, 25 Oct, 1870
Sir,
I have collected a sum of (pound sign)1200.8.4 from the Indian Community for the benefit of HmS. “Captains” Relief Fund, and I have remitted the amount thro’ the Paymaster of Hm.Ship “Forte” to the Accountant General of the Navy for transmission to the Portsmouth Committee.
2.- The loss of  Exchange to the Crown by this remittance will at 1”/10% per rupee (the price obtained by the Paymaster for a Bill cashed this day) be (pound sign) 73.13.11 and I have requested the Accountant General to await their Lordships instructions as to whether it may be borne by the Crown or whether it should be deducted from the gross sum remitted.
3.- I am aware that this matter of remittance is irregular, but I have adopted it in hopes that their Lordships would allow it in this special case and give the Fund the benefit of the Exchange.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
London.


No.233
27 Enclosures
Austria, Italy German Confederation, Denmark, Republic of ---

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.Steamer “Illora” ? 6th November 1870

Returning Slave Trade Warrants on being Superceded.
H.M.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 1 November 1870
Sir,
Agreeably to the directions contained in your letters, Nos.118 and 158 of 1869, I have the honor to return herewith the Warrants from the Government of the Countries named in the margin, together with the corresponding Warrants from their Lordships, as also Warrants from the Admiralty authorizing the search and..

Page 669

..and detentions of vessels of the countries named on the other side hereof, to Enable me  as the Officer in command of the “Forte” to act in the suppression of the Slave Trade.
2.- The book of Instructions with the Private Signals, 1C, I have transferred to my successor, whose receipt for he same is attached hereto.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London


No.234
5 Enclosures.

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.S. “Columbian” 30th October 1870

Reporting Proceedings
Hm.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 29th Octr 1870
Sir,
In continuation of my report of proceedings of the 15th October 1870, No.225, I beg you will inform their Lordships that the “Bullfinch”, having transferred Dr.Gray, late Surgeon of Trincomalie Hospital to the homeward bound Contract Steamer at Galle was detained there by bad weather until the 19th Inst: when she left for this port.
2.- I attach for their Lordships information a copy of report of proceedings from Hm.Ship “Cossack”, explaining Captain Parish’s reasons for not having visited the Brendon ? Group. I have approved of his not having done so under the circumstances, as also of his having entered into a temporary contract for the supply of coast to the Seychelles, of which he has informed their Lordships direct.

I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore.
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
Whitehall, London, Sw.
-----------Enclosures------------
1. Acknowledgement of Orders & letters received.
2. Summaries of Log. Hm.Ship “Cossack”
3. Periodical Returns, Hm.Ship “Dryad” 30th Sep: 1870
4. Application  for repayment of  travelling Expenses -----
5. ----------do------------di-------------Surgeon of “Cossack”


Page 670

No.255

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. Steamer “Fallora” ? 6 December 1870

The Services of Lieutenant Walker of Hm.Ship “Dryad”
Hm.Ship “Forte”, at
Bombay, 31st Oct: 1870
Sir,
Upon giving up the command of the East Indian Station, I hope I may be allowed to bring before their Lordships the case of Lieut.H.G.Walker ? , who was my Flat Lieut during the 18 months in which I served as 1st class Commodore, a period including the whole of the Abyssinian  Campaign.
2.- At the conclusion of the Expedition promotion or honors were given not only to the personal staff of the General Commander in Chief, but also to several of those attached to the Divisional Generals; and I trust their Lordships will now  take into consideration the case of Lieut: Walker with a view to his  promotion. He has, since my 1st class Pendant was handed down, been serving with much credit as 1st Lieutenant of the “Dryad”.
I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty
London, Sw.


No.236

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O. Steamer “Ellora,” 6th November 1870

The Services of Officers

Hm.Ship “Forte,” at
Bombay, 30th Octr 1870.
Sir,
Upon giving up the command of the East Indian Station, which I have held since 29th July 1867 until the present date (Eighteen months of the term as Commodore of the 1st Class) I hope I may be allowed to bring to the notice of their Lordships, the high opinion I have formed of the character and ability of Mr.----fall, Paymaster, who has served as my Secretary throughout my command, which includes the whole period of the Abyssinian Campaign. This Gentleman was promoted for his Services in New Zealand as Secretary to Commodore Sir H ------, and
Page 671
.. and I hope his name may be noted for Early Employment at home, or in some climate better than that of India.
2.- I have addressed a special letter to their Lordships, No.235, on the subject of Lieutenant – Walker, my late Flag Lieutenant; and I hope the unexpected and early loss of his command by Captain Basil Hall, may be considered by their Lordships when investigating the claims of Captains for service Afloat.
3.- I have commanded the “Forte” for more than a year and a half, and in the absence, in the case of that Ship, of the formal periodical reports of Inspection which are made of the other Ships of the Squadron, I beg permission to inform their  Lordships that I consider her in very good order, and that speaking generally her Officers are remarkebly zealous, and her Crew well dressed and well behaved.
4.- I beg I may be allowed to mention specially the names of Mr.Anderson, the Paymaster, and Lieutenants Reade and Hicks as deserving special mention on the books of the Admiralty: Lieut: Reades zeal and success as a f-----ry Lieutenant have been r------ent. Commander Palliser has been but a short time on board, but I have formed a very high opinion of his fitness for his present position.
I have etc
S d L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty


No.237
1 Enclosure
Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.Steamer “Ellora,” 6th November 1870

Transmitting Receipt for Secret Cypher Book
Hm.Ship “Forte” at Bombay
31st October 1870
Sir,
I have the honor to enclose herewith a receipt from my successor for a copy of  the Secret Cypher Book furnished to me in your letter M.No.31 of the 24th August 1867.
I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty


Page 672
No.238
1 enclosure

Forwarded from Bombay per P.& O.Steamer “Ellora” 6th November 1870

Transmitting Receipt for Standing & Unexecuted Orders.
Hm.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 31st October 1870
(Very curly letters again – happy day)
Sir,
I have the honor to transmit herewith a receipt from my successor for the Standing and Unexecuted orders, together with the Records of the Stations, and such other Books, Re, as was in the Secretary’s Office
I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty


Store }
Branch }
Forwarded from Bombay, per P.& O.Steamer “Ellora” 6 November 1870

Transmitting Cabin Furniture Accounts
Hm.Ship “Forte”
Bombay, 31st October, 1870
Sir,
I have the honor to forward herewith the Account of the receipt and expenditure of the Silver, Electroplate, Cutlery, Linen, Glass and China supplied for my use whilst in command of the “Forte”
I have etc
Signed L.G.Haeth
Commodore
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty

Accountant General
& Controller of Navy Pay

Forwarding Pay Tickets to
Moorhurst, Dorking
December 1870
(lots of big curly letters now – MHC)
Sir,
I have the honor to transmit herewith Pay Tickets for H.M.Ships  “Forte” and “Nymphe” and Certificates under my hand, shewing the dates between which my broad Pendant was flying as Commodore in Command of the East India Station.
I have to request that the residue of Pay due to me may be paid into the hands of my Bankers.
Messrs Bosanquet Salt & Co
78 Lombard Street
I have etc
Signed L.G.Heath
Captain R.N.
To the Secretary
Of the Admiralty

(different handwriting  - LGH’s ?)

Anstie Grange, Holmwood, Jan 2/71
Slave Trade

Sir,  I request I may be informed whether  their Lordships have been pleased to comply with my suggestion made in my letter No.202 of 1870 to the effect that my letter no.25 of 1870 may be printed and attached to the report of the Committee on the East African Slave Trade.
Their Lordships have through your letter M. of Dec 8/70 informed me that certain expressions used by me in those letters were uncalled for and I presume therefore that the Committee have shewn to the satisfaction of their Lordships that when they reported in Jan 1870 the existence of a practice of landing the crews and passengers of vessels that have been destroyed at some out of the way place and afterwards obtaining the condemnation of the vessel ex-poste statements “they were unaware of their Lordships order issued on March 12/69 but there still remains their own distinct admission in par 45 of their reports (I have no copy of the report but I believe I rightly quote the Nos. of the lines) that they had seen their Lordships still more stringent printed circular of Nov.1869 in which that practice is  again forbidden.
I feel sure their Lordships will sympathise with me in my endeavour to justify myself and the Officers recently under my command. We are assumed by the Committee of most dishonorable conduct but we have had no opportunity even of reading the evidence upon which the accusations are supposed to be founded and I tend ? their Lordships will use their influence with the Foreign Office to obtain either the withdrawal of the Committee’s reports altogether as to its accusatory statements or to print and attach to it my attempt at rebuffing them.
L.G.Heath
Jan 7 11/71
Anstie Grange
L—to Admiralty.

Acknowledging receipt of Slave Trade Committee’ serial? reports with addendum and stating that previous letters in Adm subject had been written in ignorance of the revisions, my objections to the original report are considerably undified ? by the changes in ---- by the Committee. L.G.H.


Anstie Grange,  Holmwood
June 7/71
Sir,
The promotion of Lt.Auron ? upon the handing down of the Senior Officers Flag at Queenstown emboldens me to request you will move their Lordships to reconsider their decision in the case of Lt.H.C.Walker.
I am unaware of the nature of the rules which guide their Lordships in these cases but I venture to point out.
1st That L t.Walker was Flag Lieut for the same period as L t Auron viz 12 months
2nd That L t Walker is nearly a year senior as L.E. to L t Auron.
3rd. That Lt Walker’s service ------ed the whole period of the Abyssinian War in a climate from the effects of which 2 out of the 3 Post Captains employed have since died, whilst the services of L Auron were confined to Queenstown harbor in a time of peace.
I trust their Lordships will excuse me if I add as an additional reason for claiming their consideration upon this occasion that although my own services in the Abyssinian War were most amply rewarded and although promotion, honors or good appointments were given to a large number of the Military Staff Officers even to those ---ing with the junior ----- yet my own personal staff have received no rewards or promotions. My late Flag Capt was refused the Companionship of the Bath which was given to his juniors and my Secretary remains unemployed.
I have the honor etc
L.G.Heath
Anstie Grange, Apl 26/72
Secretary of the Admiralty.

Sir,
In reply to your letter A.G.No.20 enquiring 1st whether a statement made by Mr.Bullen late Paym r of H.M.S. “Octavia” to the effect that I had ordered him to pay for certain provisions said to have been sent from Bombay to Aden for H.M.S. Hydra is true and  2nd if true – what --- I had that the stores in question had been actually supplied I beg on the contrary to the..
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1st point to suggest in reference to the supporting vouchers to Mr.Bullins cast account which should bear my order to pay upon the face of them. Upon the 2nd point I beg you will inform their Lordships that although I have no present recollection of this particular transaction yet I believe I can safely say that I never knowingly during my command ordered the payment of any public money ---- upon vouchers produced.
In the postscript to your letter it is stated “the stores in question do not appear to have been received on board the Norma.” I should be glad to know the grounds on which this opinion is  formed in contradiction as it is to the following evidence on the other side. 1st The letter of advice from the Contractors to the Transport Officer at Aden informing him that the stores were shipped in the Norma and that the receipts of the ----- of the Norma had been forwarded to Mr.Bullen. The prep copy of this letter was seen by myself in the book of --- Janabjee ? & C o when investigating this case at Bombay in 1870.
2nd Mr.Bullen’s statement in his letter of Oct 3/69 to the Comt of Victualling that the provisions were paid for  “afteer the receipt from the Officer in charge of the stores on board the Steamer Norma had been examined”
3rd The moral (usual ?) certainty that I have that I should not have sanctioned their payments except on the material production of myself personally of supporting vouchers.
4 th  The perfectly unimpeachable character of Mssrs Jonobjee & Pertongee the Contractor.
I have the honor
Etc etc
L.G.Heath

Page  Regular - 1
Enclosure No.1 in No.210

Regulations to be observed by all Vessels arriving at
Annesley Bay
----------------
1. Every Vessel as soon as practicable be boarded by the Harbour Master, who will point out a berth, and grant or withhold pratique at his discretion.
2. Every Vessel is required to moor, and to remove from one berth to another as directed by the Harbour Master; and no Vessel is permitted to shift berth without his sanction.
3. All Mails, Letter, or Parcels for the Naval or Military Forces are to be delivered to the Harbour Master.
4. Every Vessel that may be placed in Quarantine by the Health Officer will anchor apart from the fleet, as directed by the Harbour Master, will keep the Quarantine Flag flying at her Fore top-gallant mast-head, and strictly observe Quarantine.
5. Every Vessel lying at anchor is  required to keep exhibited between sunset and sunrise the usual Lights, as directed by the Board of Trade.
6. It is forbidden to burn Blue Lights, fire Rockets, or Guns, or discharge Fire-arms at any time within the limits of the Anchorage.
7. Every Vessel is required to supply such Fresh Water as is demanded by the Lieutenant of the Watering Establishment. Steam Vessels are also required to continue condensing unless especially excused, and the books carried by the water boat are to be filled up.
8. Bathing is strictly prohibited between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. among the European crews of all Vessels.
9. It is forbidden to land Wines or Spirituous Liquors without a Permit or to sell the same, either afloat or on shore.
10. All Vessels, not being Transports, or in the employment of H.M.’s Government, are forbidden to use any of the Jetties for the purpose of landing or embarking Stores of any kind.
11. The Health Officer (on board the “Golden Fleece”) will furnish a Bill of Health, on application, to all Vessels leaving the Anchorage that may require it.
12. Every Vessel, during the time she may be discharging her Cargo, will place a boat at the service of the department to which her cargo belongs, viz. Quarter Master General, Commissariat, or Land Transport, as the case may be, from 6.a.m. taking care to acquaint the Officer of the Department of the Meal hours of the Crew.
13. Church of England Service will be performed on board the Senior Naval Officer’s Ship every Sunday at 10.a.m. and there will be a Roman Catholic Service at 9-30 a.m. on board the “Vanda,” No.20.The Masters, Officers and Crews of all Vessels are invited to attend.
14. No Dead Animal is to be thrown overboard without being weighted and towed to sea.
15. On the arrival of a Mail. A gun will be fired from the Senior Officer’s ship, and a Red Ensign at the yard arm of the Naval Yard Flagstaff will indicate that the mail is from England, and a Blue Ensign that it is from Bombay.
16. There is a Pilot Depot at the Light Vessel on the 7 fathom patch. The charge for  Pilotage is 50 Rupees, which should be paid to the Pilot so soon as the Vessel has been anchored. Ships are not obliged to take Pilots if they do not wish to do so.

L.G.HEATH, Commodore

 


On the 4th of August 1871 a House of Commons Select Committee published a report “Slave Trade (East Coast of Africa)” in which Leopold Heath gave evidence.  This report gives a good summary of the Anti Slave Trade campagn.  A copy is at the Public Record Office in Kew (HCA 36/5).

 

 

 

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