Diary of James Caldwell (1759-1838) of Linley Wood, Talke, Staffordshire, England.

The following is a transcription from the diary of James Caldwell.  This volume covers the period 1770-1808 (419 pages).  For transcriptions of other diaries and notes please click here (Index of notes and diaries of James Caldwell).

Frontispiece [the lines are centred and in very flowing script]

Bells
Common Place
Book

Form'd generally upon the Principles
Recommended and Practised
by
Mrs Locke

London
Printed for John Bell near Exeter Exchange in the Strand
1770

 

[The first eight pages are pre-printed and headed "Illustration". Page 9 is a blank page. Page 10 - 17 are ruled horizontally and labelled alphabetically with 5 sub rulings per letter sub-headed 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u'. Some of these have page numbers entered by JC but no words. Pages 18 - 22 are left blank although some have been numbered by JC. Some of the subsequent pages contain items copied by JC from books]

 

Page 23 [Numbered 6 by JC]

Popery

Popery is a species of Religion, remarkable for the strong possession it takes of the heart. Contrived by Men of deep insight in the human character and improved by the experience and observation of many successive ages, it arrived at last to a degree of perfection, which no former system of superstition had ever attained. There is no power in the understanding, and no passion in the heart, to which it does not present objects, adapted to intise(sic) and to interest them.

Robertson's Hist: Scot: Vol: 1: p: 349.

 

A Religion which repeated Acts of the Legislature had proscribed; and proscribed, not because it tended to establish in England the doctrines of Transubstantiation and purgatory. Doctrines in themselves of no political moment, but because the unlimited power of the Sovereign had always been made one of its principal Acts.

De Lolme in the Const: of Eng: p: 57.

 

There is a passage well deserving attention in a late remonstrance of the Parliament of Paris; where complaining of the abuses of the ecclesiastical power in the kingdom of France, they say to their King "that the Clergy of that realm are now busily using their utmost endeavours to support and confirm a system of Independence, the foundations of which have been laid a thousand years ago; the principles of which have been connected, developed and followed from age to age in the conduct of several ministers of the Church; and the inevitable effects of which if not stopt(sic) by the vigilance and firmness of the Magistrate, would be the most enormous abuse of the Royal Authority, as well as of Religion; the destruction of good order and tranquillity, of all the regular jurisdictions, of the laws, of the kings Sovereignty itself, and by consequence of the whole state."

 

These are the word of that very respectable Body, and whoever reflects upon them will have good reason to think, that where the popish religion remains established, the principles of Beckett will also remain, and notwithstanding the apparent absurdity of them; will perpetually disturb, and sometimes overpower, the Civil authority, win(sic) in Countries the most enlightened by learning and philosophy, or affecting the greatest latitude and freedom of thought.

Lord Lytteltons Hist: . . .[Ibin] 2nd: Vol: 4: p: 1

 

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Page 25 [numbered 7 by JC]

Constitution of England

"Whatever Advantage the Cause of Liberty may receive from general Reasonings on the Origin and Mature of Civil Government, the greater part of our Countrymen will consider, and perhaps rightly, the Inquiry(sic) into the Constitution of their own Government as a Question of Fact; that must be tried by Authorities and Precedents only; and decided at last by the Evidence of Historical Testimony, not by the Conclusions of Philosophy or Political Speculation."

Hurd's Moral and Political Dialogues Vol. 3. p. 86.

 

I have frequently remarked with Surprize(sic) the little Attention that is paid to the above obvious and just Distinction, in Conversations and Disputes on the Constitutional Liberties of England. The natural Rights of Mankind, the End and Intention of Civil Government, the original Equality of all Men, are phrases which continually resound in our Ears, and in the use of which the Friends of Liberty, as they profess to call themselves, seem to Triumph and exult. True it is, this mode of reasoning may serve to evince their attachment to Liberty and their Abhorrence of Tyranny, but it shews at the same time how little they are acquainted with the Nature and Excellence of the Constitution itself, since they are thus fearful of trusting to it for Support, but have Resource to a Title so much more distant and precarious. Instead of proving from Law and from Fact, that Englishmen are entitled to Freedom, they endeavour to shew from nature and from Reason, that they ought to be so. A Proposition equally just and incontrovertible, whether it relate to  British Freeman, or a Turkish Saver. If there be any ground for that pride which we take in the name of Englishmen, any Cause for that Envy with which we are said to be regarded by neighbouring Sates, any just claim to those glorious Appellations which this country has acquired of being the Land of Freedom, the Asylum of Liberty, it must arise from this; That the Laws and Government of it so far from depriving the People of any natural Right or privilege, essential to their real Welfare and Happiness

 

Page 26

or the unlimited Exercise of which any wise and good citizen would desire, are only formed to protect them more effectually in the Enjoyment of these Advantages, and for that purpose make ample provision, that no man. however dignified his Station, however exalted his Rank, may or can infringe upon the Liberty, the Security, or the Property of the meanest Individual, without violating the Constitution, incurring the censure of the Laws, and becoming amenable to Pains and Punishments proportioned to the Heinousness of his Offence, from the forfeiture of the Kingdom and the Crown by a prince, the Decapitation or still more infamous Execution of a noble or a private Subject, to a temporary Privation of Liberty, or the payment of an inconsiderable Fine.

J.C.

 

Page 27 [numbered 14 by JC]

Evidence

___ it may not be amiss to take notice of a Rule observed in the Law of England, which is, that though the attested Copy of a Record be good proof, yet the Copy of  Copy never sop well attested, and by never so credible witnesses, will not be admitted as a proof in Judicature. This is so generally approved as reasonable and suited to the wisdom and caution to be used in our enquiry after natural truths, that I never yet heard of anyone that blamed it. This practice, if allowable in the decisions of right and wrong, carries this observation along with it, vizt. That any Testimony, the farther off it is from original truths the less force and proof it has. the Being and existence of the thing itself is what I call the original truth. A credible man vouching his knowledge of it, a s good proof: but if another equally credible do witness it from his report, the testimony is weaker; and a third that attests the hearsay of a hearsay, is yet less considerable. So that, in traditional truth each remove weakens the force of the Proof: and the more hands the tradition has successively passed through, the less strength and evidence does it receive from them.

Locke's Essays Vol: 2: p: 283:

 

Page 28[blank page]

 

Page 29 [numbered 15 by JC]

Weights and Measures

[sub-heading in the RH margin] Troy Weight

the Fair of Troyes, in Champaign, was in the time of Charlemagne frequented by all the Nations of Europe, and the Weights and Measures of so famous a Market were generally known and esteemed.

Smith's Nat. & Causes of the Wealth of Nations Vol. 1. p. 32. 2nd Edtn.

 

Page 30 [Blank page]

 

Page 31 [numbered 20 by JC. There are signs that a page has been removed]

Emblements [meaning profits from sown land]

The law as to Emblements is, that Tenants who know when their Term is to cease are not allowed to take them. But for the Encouragement of Agriculture, this matter is not regulated in most Counties by Customs of different kinds, and these customs are held good. In some Counties and Parishes the Tenant takes the whole crop, but in most the Custom is for the Tenant to take two Thirds of the Fallow wheat, and one half of the Brush.

 

Page 32 [blank page]

 

Page 33 [blank page numbered 23 by JC]

 

Page 34

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Page 36

Antiquities

Domesday Book

Is an Ancient Record containing an Account and Survey made by Order of William the Conqueror, of all the Lands in the several Counties of England, except Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmorland, Durham and part of Lancashire; describing the quantity and particular nature of them whether Meadow, Arable, Wood or Waste Land: and also mentioning their Rents and Taxation. This book also records the several Possessors of Lands, their number, and distinct degrees. It is comprised(sic) in two volumes; one a large Folio, the other a Quarto.

"The first of these is written on 382 double pages of Vellum, in a small but plain character, each page having a double Column. The other volume, in Quarto, is written on 450 double pages of Vellum, in a single column, and in a large but very fair character. Until of late years, Domesday Book has been kept under three different Locks and Keys, one ion the custody of the Treasurer, and them others of the two chamberlains of the Exchequer. It is now deposited in the Chapter house at Westminster, where it may be consulted, on paying to the proper Officers a Fee of 6s 8d for a Search, and 4d per line for a Transcript"

The Compilation of this Book is said to have been to work of seven years, but we are not told the number of Hands employed in it.

Grose's Antiqy. Vol. 1 cum alies.

 

Page 37 [numbered 26 by JC]

Antiquities

[rest blank]

 

Page 38

Settlement

Case as stated by Counsel at Warwick Sessions 1781 for the Opinion of the Court of Kings Bench.

Poor

Jane Peake the pauper was born in the Parish of Bedworth in Warwickshire where her Father and Mother resided under a regular Certificate from the Parish of Keel in Staffordshire. Some few years after she was born her father and mother died at Bedworth, where she remained after their death till she was about seven years of age with her Brother, who was named in the said certificate, and then voluntarily went to the said Parish of Keel, where she remained till she was fourteen years of Age, during which time she was maintained by the Parish of Keel, and then hired herself for a Year and served the said year, and two or three others in the said Parish of Keel, at the expiration of which last Service she returned voluntarily to the said Parish of Bedworth to her said Brothers house at Bedworth, and was then afterwards hired to one Thomas Parker of the said Parish for a year and served him such year in the said Parish of Bedworth, and was then hired and served another year with Eusebius Holmes in the said Parish of Bedworth. the said certificate was produced in Court, and brought from the Parish Church of Bedworth where it remained ever since it was given.

Thos Greene. John C. Gough

 

The Pauper was removed by an Order of Sir Roger Newdigate Bart. and I Howlette Esqr. two Justices of the Peace for the County of Warwick dated 9th June 1781 from Bedworth to Keel; and on an Appeal brought by the Parish of Keel, the above case was stated, which coming on to be heard in the Court of Kings Bench before Ld. Mansfield and others in Hilary Term 22nd. Geo. 3rd. [Hilary term is one of the four terms of the courts of common law. It runs from Jan11th  to Jan 31st ] (Mr Dunning being of Counsel for the Appellnts) the court were of opinion that the Pauper did not gain a Settlement in her own Right by the

 

Page 39 [numbered 27 by JC]

hiring and Service in Bedworth, but that she continued during such Service under the operation of the Certificate, the length of Tine between her departure from and Return to Bedworth not being a sufficient Desertion of the Certificate.

 

NB. On speaking to Mr Dunning afterwards myself on this Determination of the Court, he professed himself satisfied therewith, though in their Consideration of the Case, they had confined themselves entirely to the Point of Time. But surely the true question was, whether the Pauper by doing such Acts, and performing such Service as the Law has thought proper to reward by a Settlement, vizt. by the hiring and Service for a Year in Keel was not ipso facto discharged from the Certificate and from that time in a Capacity to gain a Settlement in her own Right as well in the Parish of Bedworth as elsewhere!

Mr Inge Chairman of the Staffordshire Sessions, and a very able and experience Magistrate was clearly of Opinion with the Appellants when I spoke to him about it in London, and thought the Court had determined upon a wrong ground.

 

Page 4- [numbered 28 by JC]

Insurance

Assessment of Policy & Covt. to be inserted in a Mortgage of Leasehold.

And this . . .[Indre] further . . .[Witssoth] [?witnesseth] that for the . . .[concions.uss] [?concessions] & also in consn [consideration] of the Sum of 5s of like lawful Money of G.B. by the sd. Josiah Wedgwood to the sd. Chas. Heath in hand paid at or before the Sealing & delivery of these presents He the sd. Chas Heath Hath assigned and set over & by these presents Doth assign & set over unto the sd. Josiah Wedgwood his exors. admons. & assigns All that one certain Instrument or Policy of Insurance No 17672 whereby the Sum of £1000 is insured on the said Messuage Tenement Building or Premises hereby assd.[assessed] agt. Loss or Damage by fire in the Westminster Fire Office and a;; sum & sums of money by the sd. Policy To Hold, receive & take the same full benefit & advantage to arise therefrom unto the sd. Josiah Wedgwood his exors. admons. & assigns. for ever as a further and collateral Security for the Payment of the sd. Sum of £800 so advanced as ap. of the Interest to grow due for the same but subject to the same Condition or Proviso for Redemption as the sd. Messge. Tenemt. or Coachouse(sic) Stable Buildings & Premises hereby assigned are by these presents subjected to And the sd. Chas Heath doth hereby for himself his heirs, exors, & admons. further cov. [covenant] promise & agree to & with the sd. Jos. Wedgwood his exors, admons & assigns. that he the sd. Charles Heath his exors. or admons. shall & will from time to time & at all times until the sd. Sum of £800 & Int. as assd. shall be fully pd. off & discharged to the sd. Jos. Wedgwood his exors. admons & ass. keep the sd. Mess. or Tenemt. Coachouse Stable Buildings & premises hereby ass. or intended so to be insured or cause the same to be kept insured against Loss or Damage by fire in  some substantial Insurance Office in London or Middlesex for the Sum of £1000 at the least & shall & will from time to time assign to the sd. Josiah Wedgwood his exors. admons. & assigns. the  policy or policies of Insurance to be effected as afsd. on the sd. premises as a Coll. Security for the paymt. of the Sum of £800 & Int. And it is further agreed by & between the sd. Charles Heath & Josiah Wedgwood that in case the sd. Chas. Heath his exors or admons shall in any manner neglect or refuse to keep the sd. premises so insured agt. Loss or Damage by fire as afsd.  that it shall & may be lawful to & for the sd. Jos. Wedgwood his exors. admons. or assigns thereupon to insure & keep insured the sd. Messge. or Tenement Coachouse Stables Buildings & premises hereby insured for the Sum of £1000 at the expense Costs & Charges of the sd. Charles Heath his exors. admons/ & admons. & that the sd. premiums shall not be redeemed or returnable by the sd. Chas. Heath his exors. admons or assigns but upon payment of as well as of all . . . Sums of Money which shall have been paid laid out and expended by the sd. Josiah Wedgwood his exors. admons. or assigns in the insuring or keeping the sd. premises so insured afsd. togr. with lawful Int. for the same from the . . . times when such sums shall so be advanced as also the sd. promisd. Sum of £800 & Int. as apd. therewith

 

Page 41 - 46

[Journal pages from the end of the book]

 

Page 47 [numbered 1 by JC]

Glass

For the principle, and general Idea of making Glass see Cramers Act. of assaying page 422 to page 447 - where there is the description of a Glass assaying Furnace.

[This entry was crossed out and rest of page used for the journal]

 

Page 48 [numbered 2 by JC]

Cobalt

Thus Earth which tinges Glass with a blue colour, has been found only in the Cobalt of Arsenick(sic) & Bismuth, and it may be known extempore, if you but melt it with two or three times as much Borax on account of the specific blue colour which it gives to this Salt. 423. Cramer

[Rest of page used for journal]

 

Page 49 [numbered 3 by JC]

Alkaline fixed salt

To make clear common glass more transparent, you must extract the Salt out of Saline Ashes of any sorts of vegetables. But you must choose vegetables that have been  gathered in their perfect growth, not exposed long to the Injuries of the Air, not very old neither; for the Rains , and the Air itself at last wash off & consume that out of which alkaline Salt is afterwards to be produced by fire. Nor can you ever produce out of all vegetables a quantity of fixed Alkali, that will repay your Charge and trouble. You must consult the experiments of Chymists(sic) upon this matter. Cramer p. 435

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Page 50 [numbered 4 by JC]

Prints

See an Essay upon Prints containing Remarks upon the principles of picturesque Beauty, the different kinds of Prints, and the characters of the most noted Masters, illustrated by Criticisms in particular pieces; to which are added some Cautions that may be useful in collecting prints. Printed for J. Robson London 1768. small 8vo.

this is a well written masterly performance,- I have read it with great pleasure. The Author in his preface mentions a Dictionary of Engravers ancient & modern in three volumes published by F. Basan Engraves at Paris. which he says seems to be accurate.

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Page 51 [numbered 5 by JC]

Drawing

When you draw after any Object, take the middle or some other fixed point to begin with; then draw the next part to that & so on; because the Eye will measure small distances more exactly than large ones, & thus make gentle Transitions from a part to the whole.

W. Crofts.

 

Landscape Painting

Trees Sketch out the Trunk & Bramches slightly, with a Camel hair pencil, if you work upon a glazed plate, or with a black lead pencil upon paper - wash in the Leafage faintly as at  A, leaving Spaces for lights between the Masses. [JC may have been referring to an example which is not now included.] Convert the washed Grounds into leaves &c. by darker touches as at B. Shade the underpart of the Tree & the Hollows between the Masses as at C. C. Never draw the Trunks by two visible parallel lines; but touch the Lines of the Trunks & Branches with interrupted strokes, which at a distance will have the effect of continued lines without the stiffness of those that we see at D. Shade the Trunks not by perpendicular strokes of the Brush thus [little drawing illustrating the point] but by horizontal touches thus [another drawn example] In shading Trunks of Trees and other Objects in general, do not shade with a dark colour quite to the outline of an Object on a dark Ground; nor with a light Colour to the Contour of a light Ground; because ion these cases the Object would be totally lost in the Ground. Wash in the Masses before you mark in the upper branches; and then mark them faintly before you form the Groupes(sic) of Boughs by darker Touches.

From W. Stringer of Knutsford Junr. at Chelsea the 4th of May 1773. Given on occasion of the Empress of Russia's Order for a Service of Queens Ware to be enamelled with views of Gothic Buildings and English Gardens.

[rest of page used for journal]

 

Page 52 [numbered 6 by JC]

Brown Gold

Dissolve pure Gold in Aqua Regia, [A mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids] then dilute it with water; precipitate with a solution of Copper. Wash well the precipitate, dry it, & mix with a little clarified Honey, which prevents it adhering together and keeps it in a proper working state. No Harm will ensue from any particles of Copper which may be left by the precipitant. Honey is an Addition of my own; and I found it to work much better in Honey & water than in anything else. A little Address is necessary when the precipitate is dry, in mixing it with the Honey so as to prevent its caking or adhering together, so as not to mix with the Honey, or work free with the pencil.

W. Wedgwoods Letter 30th Septr. 1769

18th Oct 1769

RC [?abbreviation for recipe]

1dwt Gold cuttings from the Gold Beaters, &

8dwt Do.                                Leaf Gold in Bits

9dws 2 ½ oz Aqua Fortes double distilled [nitric acid]

          10oz Sal Ammoniac [ammonium chloride]

put in gradually. set warm by the Fire in a vial - pour the solution into a Bottle or Basin of water, & precipitate with Copper in small plates

7                            Brown Gold continued.

Another Process

Amalgamate Gold with Mercury. Triturate[grind to a fine powder] it a long time with Saltpetre [potassium nitrate] in an Agate Mortar; then dissolve the Mercury & nitre[saltpetre] with weak aqua fortis, & the Gold will precipitate.

Or

Solution of Gold in Aqua Regia, precipitated with Mercury

Or

a Solution of Roman Vitriol [copper sulphate] precipitates Gold from Aqua Regia

Or

A solution of vitriol of Mars [iron sulphate]

 

Page 53 [numbered 7 by JC]

continued

The Recipe for making brown Gold in the Treatise at the end of Art de Vinini is very good; I translated it for Mr Rhodes. he has tried it, and thinks there is no better method of doing it.

[rest of page blank]

 

Page 54 [numbered 8 by JC]

Bronzing

Lay Dr Turners brown varnish on (No 10) the same as for gilding; then mix some of your Bronze powder in a Saucer with a large proportion of Lamp black [a pure carbon pigment unaffected by acids], both dry: When the varnish is of a proper dryness for gilding lay this Powder on plentifully with a large Camel hair or soft pencil. The pencil should be about as large as the end of your finger; after this warm the vases; but they must not be much warmer than a Bloodheat. When dry, rub them well with a hard Brush; dry them with a gentle warmth and they are finished. This is the fine antique Bronze. If you would have any part seem as if it was rubbed off to the Brass, lay a very little of the Bronze powder alone upon a prominent part before you lay on the mixed powder. The powders require no nicety in the mixing; the finger and Thumb is sufficient; and it should not be mixed too fine. The pieces should never come very near the fire, a strong Head, or a Stove would spoil the work.

W Wedgwood from Parkers Practice

 

Page 55 [numbered 9 by JC]

Uses for vases; & Articled to make.

Pot Pouris                 with pierced Tops, & a close cover falling upon a ledge within

Essence Pots

Lamps upon Tripods &c.

Candlesticks - with inverting nozzles - with ornamental nozzles on the Shoulders -

                        with several nozzles springing up thro' a silver plate like one at Lady 

                        Shelbournes - and or Tea Tables, slender

Rich Ewers for side boards                                    Goblets & Rummers

Cisterns

Watch stands

Cases for Chimney & Organ clocks

Gold cases to ornament Looking Glasses or Pebble vases

Tea Kitchens

Tea Canister vases

cases for Flower pots

Salts - in black

Tiles for Stoves

Stover recommended by Sir Jno Goodrick.

            Mem. the German stove sent to Mr Banks too large & heavy

Sir Jno. very much approves the Swedish Stoves; but the Risque of firing large pieces with us is too great; & we think they might be imported much cheaper than we could make them

Hilts of Swords to be polished

Nobs(sic) of door Do.

Buttons for Coats & Hats

 

[several blank lines]

pages 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Blanks or small extracts from Poetry.

Quoniain et sic Gentes nobilitantur, Pliny Lib. 35. Chap. 12.

speaking of Manufacturers of Earthen Ware.

 

Page 56 [numbered 17 by JC]

To prepare Wood or Plaister for Moulding

Melt Bees Wax, then dilute it with Oil of Turpentine while it is hot. Then brush the vessel over with this mixture & rub it in. It sinks into the wood or plaister, & leaves no Thickening upon the Surface.

Blue colour

Exp. 3 parts                             sprinkling Smalts 1/6 p lb[pigment made from 

                                                     pulverised glass coloured blue with cobalt]

        1 part                               Zaffer [an impure oxide of cobalt used in the making of 

                                                     smalt and also used in the making of blue enamel]

Flux

Potash of nitre equal parts [potassium nitrate]

¼ Flux to one part of the Colour

This is a fine colour for edging Queens Ware; but fluxes still better on a Biscuit Ground.

 

Page 57 [numbered 18 & 19 by JC]

Enamel Kilns & other Chemical Vessels

April 1770

An enamel Kiln made st Chelsea of Pipe Clay and Sand about 1 of clay to 2 ½ or 3 of Sand about 5 feet high 2F: 6I Diameter 2 ½ Inches thick - cracked & burst all to pieces before it was near Red Hot. the Composition was bad and the fire applied too hastily.

May 22 1770. Have fired 28 painted Etruscan vases, and a few flower pots in an Iron Kiln this Morning, the first firing here. The fuel, Wood. We kindled the fire about 8. In 2 hours the Inside of the Kiln & all the vases were quite Red; this Heat was kept up and increased about an hour, and then the fire was pulled out, as the Tryal(sic) appeared to be sufficiently fired.

June. Made another Enamel Kiln of pipe clay, and Glass House pots coarsely pounded. It stands very well, and is in all respects a good Kiln

We have since made several good Enamel Kilns of different sizes, by a Mixture of the old Kiln coarsely pounded and sifted, and as small a quantity of fresh well tempered pipe clay as the burnt pot powder could be mixed up with to stand in form to be burnt. About 3 of founded pots, to 1 of fresh Clay. Mr D'Antie in a Memoir mentioned in the Chemical Dictionary under the Article Vitrifycation (sic) , has determined that the proportion of the old to the new Clay should be as 4 to 5: which I apprehend would shrink very much, and that the proportion mentioned above would be much better.

Vid. Potts Treatise on the manner of making Chemical Vessels.

 

Page 58 [numbered 20 by JC]

Chemical Vessels continued

[large blank space left, then..]

Common Brick Clay & Horse Dung make an ordinary kind of Crucibles

Clay mixed with Marle(sic) [soil comprised of a mixture of clay and carbonate of lime - usually used as a fertiliser], or metallic particles of any kind, are not fit for crucibles; in general all Clays that ferment with Acids are unfit for this purpose.

The whitest clay is generally the best for this use; that particularly called Pipe Clay.-

These Clays ought &c.

As Torres, pour laplupart dorvient etre premierement sechees, ensuite lattues avec un Maillet, a fin que les pierres les plus grossieres se separent de la masse &re soient pas reduited en poussien.

 

Page 59 [numbered 21 22 & 23 by JC]

[page blank]

 

 

Page 60 [numbered 24 by JC]

[headed] Forms to take patterns of

If they are round, turn the round part in a Lathe exactly to the pattern in Wood; and get the Handles, Beaks, or other waved or ornamental parts carved as to mould & draw freely.

If they are oval waved and varied with Swells, and cannot be moulded . . . without breaking, or Injury let a . . . beat them out in Copper.

Plaister(sic) must not be poured into the Inside of any fine vessel as the plaister expands in setting and may break the piece. The Moulds of such pieces must be taken at twice, the half being bedded in clay.

 

Page 61 [numbered 25 by JC]

[also numbered 26.27.28 by JC]

[headed] Drawing of vases

Drawings of vases for Black to be made 1 Inch larger at 6 - and for the cream colour 1 at 9. - then the size of the vessel is intended to be when fired - to allow for the sinking(sic) [shrinking] of the clay

[I think this refers to the allowances to be made for shrinkage of these two types of clay when fired - 'drawing' meaning drawing in.]

 

Page 62 [numbered 29 by JC]

[headed] Ornamenting Silver

Mr Wedgwood & I have been strongly induced by the present bad Taste both in the forms & ornaments of Silver Vessels, to make some Attempt to reform this valuable branch of Business by making some cups and other things in a chaste stile(sic)[style] with modest and proportional Ornaments; and particularly by ornamenting them with Etruscan Borders; though we apprehend some difficulty in bringing these Ornaments upon the vessels, whether by raised Bands which we would avoid, or by turning out in the Lathe spaces for the Bands, on which the Borders may be made. Here we left the subject in our last conversation upon it, but it has occurred to this Morning Sunday 1st of March 1772 that silver vessels made of fine simple forms may be most be . . .[artifully] ornamented both with Etruscan Borders & figures with Gold laid on in the manner of Water Gilding; and that the Borders and figures may both be cut up with the Graver, exactly in the same manner as we cut up the painted figures upon the vases with a pencil; and if the silver colour should be too faint a Contrast for the Gold, might not its colour in the strokes be darkened with some Chemical preparation of Sulphur or Aqua fortis?

 

Page 63 [numbered 30 by JC]

[transcribers note: Generally, but not always, JC rules off between each experiment, particularly when there are more than one on a page.]

[headed] Experiments to produce prismatic Colour in the Surface of glazed vessels, by a partial Resolution of the Metals in the Glazes.

Ex1.

put a piece of Cream Coloured ware with proofs of purple and other colours upon it into a Tobacco pipe with a little pounded charcoal, & closed the pipe head with tempered clay.

Made it red hot in the wind furnace.

Several of the Colours were a little tinged with the metallic appearance, & upon the cream colour there was an agreeable variety of changeable colours, with perfect Smoothness.

Ex2.

Made some . . .[Hessar] Sulphur half Sulphur and half pot ash; but these substances did not seem well combined.

Placed a pebbled cup in a crucible and some painted Gems with half an ounce of this . . .[Hessar] & Euted [mixed] well.

the crucible was made red hot in the furnace & kept so sometime.

When it was opened the Glaze of the Cup was blistered & corroded all over - the cream coloured Glaze turned into a brittle black calyx & almost all pulled off.

The Gems painted with the Etruscan Red were turned quite black.

p. 31

I apprehend in this last Experiment the following Defects.

(1) That the . . .[hessar] was not well made

(2) That these should have been 2 parts fixed Alkali for one of Sulphur, that the oil of vitriol might have been perfectly saturated with it, so that the Heat of the Fire would only have raised the Phlogiston [principle of in-flammability formerly thought to have existed in combustible bodies] and

(3) That it had too much fire.

 

Ex3.

Placed a Tea cup cream-coloured on the Inside, & pebbled on the outside, with a variety of colours, in a crucible, with some pounded charcoal. Heated it red, & cooled it gradually.

the Inside turned to a bluish black, with some beautiful prismatic colours, & was perfectly smooth;

 

Page 64 [numbered 31 by JC]

the outside was also turned to a bluish black, with some prismatic colours; but some parts of the surface were rough & dry; either owing to something in the Glaze that would not revive, into some vitriolic fumes, as this experiment was made in the same crucible as the last.

 

Ex 4.

Placed a cream coloured Tea cup as above with charcoal Dust, and made the Crucible hot, and as soon as it was red hot took it out if the Furnace. The Cup was not at all affected. I apprehended because the Heat was not sufficient to melt the Glaze.

 

Page 65 [numbered 32 by JC]

[headed] Earthenware rendered transparent

Dec. 19th 1772

Mr Simpcock brought me one of our Teacups cream colour perfectly transparent; that is full as much so as the finest China. This effect seemed to have been produced by the Absorption of Oil of Lavender which had been in the cup for about a week. In rubbing the Cup he broke a piece out of it, and it appeared the cup had been cracked before the oil was put into it, thro' which crack I suppose the oil got into the Biscuit. I ordered the piece that was broken out to be made red hot, which was done & that piece became opaque, while the rest of the Cup remained transparent.

 

Blue upon Cream Colour

Expts with fine Smalt 21s. pr Oz.

Flux

Borax, white lead, & Glass equal parts 

melted together

Ex no. 3. Blue of this Flux equal parts. Grounds well; but is rather too hard.

 

Ex. 4

the same with a little Flint

grounded but still harder

 

Ex. 5

The same with a little Borax

grounded but weaker

 

Ex. 6

Melted Flux

Glass, Borax and Flint equal parts melted together

1 part of each of the above, with one part of this Flux that is, 1 part of fine Smalt, 1 of Common 1 Flux

 

Ex. 7

p. 33

½ melted Flux No. 6

½ blue                        calcined [burnt to ashes] red hot

This makes it less harsh

 

Ex. 8

The same as 7 with a little more of the Flux No 6

 

Memdm. 

Common Smalt with the Flux No 6 chips off & will not adhere at all to the Glaze.

 

Page 66 [numbered 33 by JC]

[headed] Blue continued

Ex. 9

A cup painted

1 part blue

& more than one part melted Flux, more than in No 8

This colour is pale, but traces well & adheres well; tho' I cannot judge perfectly of it, as it has not had fie enough. It must be fired again.

 

Ex. 10

The same as the last with much more Flux, Mr S did not observe the exact quys. by weight; but more than 2 to 1.

This grounds & comes to its lustre with the fire that has left Ex. 9. dry; but it does not trace well & is apt to chip off.

 

Ex. 11

1 pt. Blue             } Memdm. Flint seems to prevent blistering

2 pts. Flux. No 6. }

 

Ex. 12

p. 34

Flux &ldots;    1 Flint Glass  }

                 6 white lead  } melted together

                10 of Borax   }

 

Ex. 12. +

The same as 12, but fixed to the Melting of the Glaze, as appears by the Running of the Colour, which is very good but should have a gentler fire; betwixt the common fire for the purple, and this last in the small Earthen Furnaces which was pushed too far.

 

Ex. 13

Feby. 3 1773

Iron dissolved in Aqua fortis, and afterwards made thin enough for a Glaze, shaked round in a cream coloured cup, and fixed with the ware turned the Glazing on the Inside to a shining but variegated orange colour, with a metallic cast.

 

Ex 14.

Feb. 4

Being apprehensive that this colour is the Flogiston [from the Greek meaning 'nothing', the principle is that everything has an element of nothing inside it which can be liberated in some way,] in some measure let loose and the same with Dr Priestley's, Nitrous Air or rather Metallic Air, as it is common to all the Metals, I desired Mr S to expose a piece of glazed ware to the Fumes of

 

Page 67 [numbered 34 by JC]

p.35

Iron while it was dissolving in Aqua Fortis in a close crucible. but the first experiment was in an open crucible; and it produced a stronger & deeper colour that the Solution Ex. 13 & was perfectly fixed in the Glaze.

 

Ex. 15.

New Iron - & Aqua Fortis - in a close crucible - 'till the crucible has been hot enough to melt the Glaze of a Cup inclosed in it.

This process threw up a large quantity of Fumes, & gave little colour to the Glaze; but left a considerable sediment at the bottom of a cup in the crucible which we have collected and suppose to be Flowers of Iron [a stalagmite type formation], It looks like a fine Ocre(sic).

We also found a considerable quantity of these flowers in the bottom of the crucible; but of a darker colour. the first is marked Pror. Ex. 15. the second Do. Do. 15. X

Three new Nails which were used for the Iron were but slightly corroded on the surface, & yet produced a considerable quantity of Flowers.

 

Ex. 16

Feby 6 1773

To paint upon a Glazed surface with the Flowers of Iron

a piece of china   } without Flux

                            } with Flux

a piece of  Queens  } without Flux

                               } with Flux. 1 part Flint, & 10 Borax melted together

In a com Stove fire the glaze of Queens ware was painted a good chocolate colour without the addition of Flux; with Flux it was brighter

 

p. 36 In the long Book 27 Mr Rhodes

Ex 17 

2 parts common white English Enamel

1 part fine Smalt 16/ or 21/ pr Oz

¼ part white Lead

ground together

This is an excellent colour and never crackles; but the Smalt should be bought cheaper

add a little nitre

 

Page 68 [numbered 35 by JC]

[headed] Blue

Ex. 18

Flux

1 pt common enamel

1 pt Hard Venetian Enamel

1 pt Lead

¼ pt Borax

A good general Flux for Smalts. If this should crackle, a little fine white Rocke will have a good effect.

 

Ex. 19

the same as 17 but with twice the quantity of fine Smalt, and the plate has less smalt, and a little of the Flux No. 18

 

Ex. 20

Blue

3 parts deep coloured com. smalt

3 parts hard Venetian enamel

1 part white lead, vitrified together, a little fine smalt added in the grinding

 

Mr R thinks the adding some Smalt afterwards in this way keeps the colour from crackling. This proved a very good & pleasant colour, marked 34 on one side & 20 on the other.

[rest of page blank]

 

 Page 69 [numbered 36 by JC]

[It is probably worth inserting a historical note at this point to put things in context. At this period scientists believed that as things burned they gave off a substance called phlogiston ie the fire released it. Metals, however when burnt, left an ash called the calx of the metal which weighed more than the original metal. Joseph Priestly, published descriptions of his experiments, "On Different Kinds of Air" in 1772 and in 1774 when experimenting with heating calx of mercury discovered oxygen. It is very possible that JC knew Priestly personally as he ran a day school at Nantwich from 1758 to 1761, was ordained a dissenting minister in 1762 and was also very involved in Birmingham's Lunar Society, meeting regularly with Josiah Wedgwood. Note that the experiments that JC is carrying out are dated 1772.]

 

p 37[in margin]

Feby 6 1773

Having made some Experiments lately with a view to trying the effects of phlogistic Fumes upon glazed Bodies in expectation of producing all the Colours this way without the immediate Application of the Calxes of Metals; the Affects of which as related at above p 30 &c. would induce me to proceed if I had leisure for these curious Enquiries, I am now still more encouraged to expect some favourable consequences of these Experiments, from an Attention to Dr Priestleys curious experiments on Air, with a Copy of which he has been pleased to present me; and especially from some Appearances attending his experiments on inflammable & what he calls Nitrous Air. [nitric oxide]

I have already discovered that the red Fumes of Nitrous Air, may be fixed, & give a durable colour to a glazed surface, & be as perfectly grounded as the best Enamel colour.

And also that a red powder may be collected from this Air, which I suppose to be the Flowers of Iron.

I suspect the flowers of other metals may be collected, that is in a closed crucible, or by means of a Retort or Receiver which I mean to try. And I should be glad to collect the

p38[in margin]

Substances that Dr Priestley has often observed to subside in his Experiments in Inflammable Air; and to try in what respect these substances differ from the Flowers obtained from the nitrous solutions in close vessels.

Ex 21

We dissolved some Copper in Aqua fortis; & placed a Queens ware saucer over the cup in which the Copper was put - A green Dew was collected upon the bottom of the saucer exposed to the Furnace, we then placed the cup in the fire of the Air furnace, on the top of a crucible that was then in the fire, & laid a Queen's Ware pitcher over the Cup without making it close.

That part of the pitcher over the middle of the Cup was slightly covered with a fine green powder, and the extremities of the pitcher, & the sides of the Cup with a fine black powder which I beg leave to call the Flowers of the Copper.

 

Page 70 [Numbered 37 by JC]

38 cont'd[in margin]

Ex 22

These black Flowers used as an Enamel colour, in a gentle heat, produced a greenish black that grounded well without blistering both with or without Flux. Probably in a stronger Heat these flowers will produce a Green.

23

These black flowers with the following Flux viz. 1 of Flint & 12 of Borax, upon Queens Ware produced a shining black; upon white Biscuit an Etruscan shining black, and upon china a fine shining black - as may be seen in the specimens. These colours run even without grinding, or any Case in the manner of laying them on; and appear to be much finer & better that the common preparation of Metal.

With white Lead and the above Filing the Flowers of Copper give a dark green colour upon Queens Ware.

But to have a fine green this way I apprehend the heat used should be very moderate, perhaps not more than a sand heat or Water Bath.

24

Flowers of Iron 2 parts - White Lead 1 part

Produced a fine Red upon Queen's Ware inclining to Scarlet. See the proof

Ex 25

Feby 9 1773

I put a small quantity of thin Copper into a Retort, poured into it some Spirit of Nitre diluted with water; placed the Retort upon a sand heat & applied a Receiver without being . . .[bited].

the receiver was soon full of red fumes. Dr Priestleys nitrous Air- but this Heat does not seem sufficient to drive over the flowers. Before the Evaporation of the Aqua fortis & water was compleated[sic] we took a little of the solution which was bluish green & run it over a Queens Ware Saucer, which is to be fired

(25X) [in margin] 

to try if the colour will fix & what colour it will prove.  [JC has inserted a cross at this point which references to a note below saying a Dirty Brown] The Solution was poured out of the Retort before the moisture was quite evaporated with a Design of finishing the Evaporation in another Vessel.

40 [in margin] The pipe of the Retort was placed too high above the Solution  for the Metallic fumes to rise so high; or the Heat was not sufficient. I wish to catch green flowers copiously, raised with the least possible Heat. In a close Crucible and a considerable Heat the Flowers are black & give a black colour.

The residue at the bottom of the Retort after the

 

Page 71 [numbered 38 by JC]

remaining Moisture had been evaporated was of a bluish green colour.

a Cup 25 was painted with it

1 - The Residuum only in the moisture that was left at the bottom with it

2 - The same with a little Flux 23

3 - Do. more Flux

4 - Do. Do. & a little white lead

5 - & 6 Do. Do. more lead.

 

Ex 26

We worked a Pebble Rummer oven with a solution of Iron in Aqua fortis diluted with water.

NB. The finest specimen we have yet of the metallic orange colour was made by Mr Simpcock with a solution of Iron in Aqua fortis & Sal Ammoniac that is in Aqua Regia, & the solution was clear without sediment.

 

Ex 27

Dissolved Iron in Aqua Regia made with Sal Ammoniac & washed over the inside of a Queens Ware Cup with the Solution. It was an even bright yellow as soon as it was washed over and is marked A.

 

Ex 28

Washed over another Cup with the same Solution, diluted in Water. this appeared very faint upon the Cup when it was put on & is marked B.

 

p.41 [in margin]

When the Retort was taken out of the Mouth of the Receiver it continued full of a Turbid red air, but there appeared no Flowers.

I pour'd in some Water and shook it about, the Receiver was soon cleared, and the water was converted into a fine mild acid, which dissolved Copper, very pfectly[sic] and uniformly, and seemed to have more affinity with it than Iron. This acid might probably be of service to the Engravers. The next day a cloud of yellow ore became visible in the water.

No.4. On the Cup 25 is extremely fine shining black; and . . . thin and fluxed mostly without grinding.

This Trial, and all the other Numbers upon this Cup were green before they went into the Fire. This residue was not washed, but very strongly impregnated with the Nitrous Acid, and yet this Acid no way injured the vitrification.

the whiter parts of this Ewer were turned to an Orange red but the other colours were not much affected, and on the whole the Rummer looked muddy and disagreeable.

This cup came out an even Bright and rich orange colour.

 

Page 73 [numbered 39 by JC]

P41 Contd Conclusions of Expt. 28

Try Silver

this cup came out an uneven and flaked and palish orange colour not deep and rich like No. 27

 

Ex 29

P 42[in margin]

Flowers of Copper collected in the crucible with a little flux No 28 upon a Biscuit cup

 

Ex 30

Flowers of Copper as above with the same Flux, and a little White Lead upon a Biscuit Cup

 

Ex 25 Contd

The Residue at the bottom the Retort being well wash'd was very fine green powder and gave a good green; but upon dropping into it a little of the Liquor poured off diluted with Water it gives a black.

 

31

Mr S put some silver and Aqua ffortis diluted into a crucible. From this white fumes arose, but at the bottom of the crucible there was a black Powder or Flowers. These Flowers with the No 29 Flux gave a greenish grey

 

29

P 43 [in margin]

This produced a firm smooth black, that adhered to the ground & did not shine much

 

30

this produced a shining black but being laid on thick was not even, it has been fired with the black ware and the cream coloured ware; the last staid . . . more than the former - and stands well.

 

Page 73 [numbered 44 by JC]

February 15th 1773

I desired Mr Rhodes to try to gild silver with gold and Borax with a view to draw Borders and other Ornaments upon Plate in gold upon the ideas started page 29.

 

Ex [no number given]

1 pt Brown gold

1pt Aurum Pulminians

1 pt Calcina Borax

This composition with water only traces upon Silver. Some lines upon silver spoons were made firm by exposing it to a moderate Heat in an open Fire

 

33

18 February 1773

We placed ware in a small Kiln upon a perforated iron Plate that made a double bottom. When the ware was of an Enamelling heat we threw in fumes of Iron, dissolving in weak Spirit of Nitre in a Retort increasing the ebullition [boiling] by a sand heat. But the ware was not at all affected by this process.

 

34

Made a glazed cup red hot in a Crucible and sprinkled Charcoal upon it in this state covering the Crucible from time to time as the powdered Charcoal was thrown in, but it had no material Effect.

 

35

P.45

Supposing Inflammable Air might be of the Nature of Phlogiston I ordered a bit of beech wood to be put in the bottom of the crucible; some glazed Pitchers to be put over it & closed up. The crucible was made red hot & kept some time in the fire. Upon opening it one of the cream coloured pitchers was tinged all over the side immediately exposed to the fumes, with a dark colour that reflected various colours purple reddish Green & yellowish. And another piece was encrusted, by places, like variegated marble with a shining black.

 

Page 74 [numbered 41 by JC]

P45 Contd [in the margin]

The same Experiment repeated gave a speckled dark surface to one piece, a thick black with gold and Purple colour to another, and a purplish and gold spots to another, and some seeming veins of Gold as in some marcasites. So that here we seem to have the phlogistic Principle in the purest and most active state.

 

37

Mr Rhodes mixed two parts of Cornish Moor stone, of the whitest kind, without any mixture of Basalt or black cockle with one part of Borax, and about 1/6 of the whole of Whiting. This mixture produced on the Cream Ware Biscuit, a very fine smooth firm and white glaze that seems to agree perfectly with the Body. This experiment should be repeated and the proportions be more exactly ascertained.

Calcarious earth seems to promote the vitrification and is probably the chief secret of the fine Porcelain Glaze.

Try Lime made from the finest stone and white Marble.

This glaze was very good but hard - may be softened with a little lead.

If this glaze is to be fired in a stove it wd. be proper to flux the Stone and Borax together, and to add whiting in the grinding.

 

P46 [in margin]

38

March 9th 1773

Dissolved Zaffer [an impure oxide of cobalt] in diluted Aqua ffortis and attempted to precipitate with Chalk, at first there was strong effervescence; but no colour precipitated, and the Chalk united with the solution. With this substance without washing we had a blue colour upon cream ware; but blister'd.

Mr Rhodes had before tried without success, to precipitate a Solution of Zaffer with Pot-ash.

 

39

White Glazes}

8 Flint glass} all ground together

8 white lead}

2 Caluned Flint}

I white enamel}

This is a very good glaze upon the Biscuit Ware Fired with enamel ware, something harder than the common enamel Heat

 

Page 75 [numbered 42 by JC]

P46 Cont'd

40

[headed]White Glazes

1 of Derbyshire Peak Stone, millstone}4 pts Glass

2 of Glass and Borax fflux[sic]] 1 pt calcined Borax

2 of White Lead}

This Peak  Stone is the Common Derbyshire Millstone and has black cockle in it, tho' this does not seem to affect the colour of the Glazes.

 

41

[headed] White Glaze

1 Flint

½ pt Whiting

½ pt pipe Clay raw

½ pt Glass and Borax Flux No 40

With the Crucible makers Heat made a lump of fine Glazes, but not very white.

 

Friday 30th July 1773

This day I ordered some preserved Quince that had been poured boiling hot into a Quart Bason of Mr Wedgewoods Queens Ware, near three years ago, to be taken out, being apprehensive that the acidity of this preserve might in so long a time have corroded the Glaze, and affected the Taste, of that part of the preserve that had lain so long in contact with the glazed surface of the Vessel.

The Bason was not in Appearance either corroded or discoloured; tho; it was an old cracked Bason when the preserve was put into it, and the surface of the preserve that had been in contact so long with the Glazes, did not taste sweeter or in any way - different from the body of the Preserve.

I paird[sic] off the surface of the Preserve that had been next the Glaze and divided into two parts, each part being 0 oz 15 Dwts Troy

Melted one of these part in a crucible, with nearly its own Weight of Mutton suet

Put the other into a Glass with about 2 oz of strong vinegar.

Poured upon a plate so as to cover the whole surface of the Middle - Strong

 

Page 76 [Numbered 43 by JC]

P47 Contd [in margin]

Strong Vinegar - 11 0'Clock.

the part melted in the Crucible with Mutton Suet first gently - and then in. . .

did not produce the least Particle of received Lead, as no doubt it wo'd have done if any had been in the preserve.

Mr Wedgewoods Ware therefore may be safely used for preserving Quinces, and any other Fruit not more acid than this -

P 48

July 31st 6 o'Clock in the afternoon

The Vinegar has remained upon the Plate since Eleven o'Clock yesterday that is thirty one hours, it has made no visible fermentation but seems a darker colour (as Doct Percival observed) than when it was poured upon the Plate. On pouring several drops of solution of Hepar Sulphuris, [calcium sulphide] pale coloured clouds were formed, but no dark precipitation tho these same clouds of Sulphur turned something darker, as they mixed more with the Vinegar. On instilling the solution into fresh Vinegar there appeared tho some light colour'd Clouds, but no precipitation. I then cleaned the Plate which was no way discoloured with the Vinegar, or otherways affected as far as I cod see by a Magnifying Glass with which I observed the Glaze both before and after the Experiment.

I afterwards poured Strong smoaking[sic] Spirit of Nitre upon the same plate which all evaporated without effervescence or changing the colour of the Glaze.

The vinegar that had been poured upon the preserved Quince that had lain near three years in Contact with the Glaze likewise formed light clouds upon pouring into a considerable quantity of the solution of Hepar Sulphuris, without the least dark colour'd Precipitation.

 

P49

Vinegar was made from Gooseberrys last year in a large cream colour'd jar that holds more than six Quarts. the Vinegar was fermented and remained in this vessel about nine months; - the Glaze was not at all affected; the Vinegar was very strong and sour and made good Pickles.

[heading]From Mr Patounce

Strong Gum Water made to the consistence of Honey mixed with a strong decoction of Pearl Barley, a good Varnish for Vases and other things

 

Page 77 [numbered 44 by JC]

[top part of page left blank]

[heading] P 51 A General Account of our Encaustic colours as we make them now Aug 30 1773

Our Encaustic colours differ essentially from our common enamel colours, being hard and smooth but not Glassy. The Principle of their composition is this, that their Vitrification shall be stopt by some of the Ingredients that compose them, as the point that Gives Hardness and smoothness, without lustre of Glass, & this -  petrification, sho'd not be liable to run into vitrification, by a little more fire -

This effect may be produced either by a proportion of Tin clay, or some other substance unapt to vitrify, or by using so large a Quantity of vitrescent stones, and Tin, in proportion to the Flux, as to prevent a perfect vitrification.

[Rest of page blank]

 

Page 78 [Numbered 45 by JC]

P54

[headed] White

N1 16pts (Honyburns) best White enamel

Tapenden and Handbys Gaster Lane

1 pt Pipe Clay or Cherokee clay, calcined

The Cherokee to be more calcined than the Pipe Clay

If the enamel should be softer than usual add a little more clay

Grind them together very fine in Water and afterwards rub them up in French Lavender oil.

 

No. 2 [headed] Best General Flux

2 Opake Venice Glass

1 Calcined Borax

 

No. 3 [headed] Another Flux 

to give the Purple a red Singe

1 Rock Chrystal[sic] 1s pr Lb

1 Calcined Borax

Let the rock chrystal be finely pulverised and well mixed with the Borax in the Mortar.

 

No. 4 [headed] Encaustic Black

3 General Flux

1 Regulus of Cobalt

Ground well together and vitrify them in a crucible, part of the Regulus will fall to the bottom. Take them out of the crucible, and grind them over again & then repeat the Vitrification till the Regulus is all perfectly united with the Mass - Pound the Glass very fine, and to three parts of this Glass add I part of pounded manganese. Unite them in a gentle Heat which will prevent the Manganese from Blistering. This composition must be hardened with clay or chrystal - about 1/16 or more of clay or it may be hardened with  a greater Quantity of Manganese.

 

Page 79 [Numbered 70 by JC]

P55 Cont'd No. 5

[headed] Tracing Black for Etruscan Figures

1 best calcined verditer                 calcined just enough to redress

2 of Flux          N2

Or of the Lead Flux No. 9

 

No. 6

[headed] Another Tracing Black

2 parts of deep common smalt

1 part of Regulus of Cobalt

½ part of Venetian White Enamel

½ part Nitre

Vitrify them together, part of the Regulus will fall, grind them over again, & smelt them again until perfectly vitrified. Then add one part of manganese to three parts of the above Glass; calcine 'till just united and grind the Mass.

This is a deep black rather hard.

 

P56 No. 7

[headed] Orange Red for the grounds of the Etruscan figures

2 White Lead

2 Lead Flux

2 Venetian yellow enamel, or M Honyburns yellow

2 Ground cream colour'd Ware

½ pt stone ochre light yellow [added in a different hand]

1 part Tin

1/16 part colcothar

All ground well together

It may be made harder with more Pot, if necessary

 

No. 8 [headed] Another Orange Red, harder than the above

4 Lead flux

2 Yellow enamel

2 Tin

1 Ground pots

1 Cherokee Clay

1 Stone Ochre

All ground well together

 

Page 80 [Numbered 47 by JC]

P56 Cont'd [in margin]

No. 9 [headed] Lead Flux

 

4 Flint4 }

12 Lead12} melted and perfectly vitrified together

1 Nitre1  }

1 calcined Borax

This flux is proper for the common Enamel green, but the general Flux No 2 is better

P57 No. 10 A deep Orange red inclining to Scarlet

3 general Flux

1 Copperas calcined very slowly in a clear slow Firs, and afterwards well washd and cleaned from the vitriolic Acid. This colour may be hardened with Clay or Chrystal

 

No. 11 [headed] Yellow

Venetian (or Honyborns Enamel) deadned[sic] with clay or chrystal

 

[Heading] Greens

N12 [headed] Light green

4 yellow Enamel

4 Venice Glass Opake

1 Calcined Verditer

Well pounded and melted together

This was rather inclined to crack, but with the addition of 1/7 White Moor Stone, turned out a very pleasant green.

For encaustic Painting it may be rendred[sic] more Opake, by the addition of a little Tin with Clay or Chrystal

 

No. 13 [headed] Blue Green

4 General Flux or the opake Venetian Glass

4 of Venetian white enamel

1 Calcined Verditer

If the general Flux is used, to prevent crakling add 1/6 pt Moor Stone, and if the Opake Glass is used 1/7 as before

 

Page 81 [Numbered 48 by JC]

P58

[Heading]  Blues

 

No. 14  [headed] Dark Blue

1 of finest deep smalt from 12 to 18 pr oz

2 of general Flux if requir'd harder less Flux

 

No. 15

[heading] Light Blue

1 Strong Common smalt from ¼ to 2s pr lb

1 White Common enamel. if too hard may be softened with a little of the general Flux. may be lightened with Enamel or darkened with deep blue

 

No. 16

[heading] A Brown

1 part calcined and wash'd Copperas (as for red) calcined again in a strong heat

3 parts general Flux. Grind them together, and harden them with Clay or Chrystal, or by a larger proportion of the calcined Copperas.

 

No. 17

[heading] A Light Brown inclining to Red

1 of stone calcined

3 of the general Flux. This is a soft Brown; but harden it with more ochre for a strong encaustic colour

 

No. 18

P59

[heading] Flesh colours

A silver Flux that makes the Crimson and red colour & of a lighter Hue

12 of the Flux No 3

1 of Calx of Silver precipitated with Salt water from Aqua Fortis. Calcine them well together.

 

No. 19

[heading] Purple encaustic

6 general Flux No 2}

1 Calx cassia} incorporated in a slow Fire and hardened with Chrystal

The colour depends upon the Calx cassia, which will not be always exactly the same, but may be made lighter, by the addition of a little of the Chrystal Flux No 3 or a very small portion of the silver Flux No 18

 

No. 20

[heading] A light Rose colour

6 or 8 parts of the Flux No 21

1 part Calx Cassii. Vitrify together, and the colour becomes lighter as the Fire is increased, and may be stopt at different degrees of lightness as required. This colour may be harden'd for an encaustic Colour with chrystal.

 

No. 21

P60

[heading] Flux for Rose Colour

1 Opake Stone coloured Venetian Bead

½ part roasted Borax

Vitrified well together which may be known by trying it with Spirit of . . .[Nitre]

 

No. 22 Expt White encaustic Ground upon Black Plates

16 parts Opake Venetian Glass

4 pipe clay pounded and laid on

 

Page 82 [Numbered 49 by JC]

P60 Cont.d [in margin]

No. 23 [headed] Expt

15 parts general Flux No 2

4 pipe clay

much too soft

No. 24

2 parts clay

3 parts flux

not hard enough

No. 25

1 part Clay

1 part Flux

pretty hard but blistered if much fired

No. 26

3 clay

2 Flux No 2

harder but blister when over fired

P61 [in margin]

No. 27

2 Clay

4 Flux No 2

very hard and pretty smooth

No. 28

2 Cherokee clay calcined and Ground

2 Flux No 2

this proved very soft and run into a Glaze that was very hard.

No. 29

1 Cherokee clay that was calcined and ground

1 Flux No 2

this also run into a Glaze so that it wd. not scratch with a black pitcher

No.30

3 Clay

2 Flux No 2

This also is too much vitrified for an encaustic Ground

No. 31

4 Clay

2 Flux No 2

This is firm, but wants Body

No. 32

6 Ch Clay

2 Flux No 2

Some vitrification, and firm, but wants body

No. 33

c Ch Clay

2 Flux No 2

Abot. 1 part Flint. with the least possible of . . .[Pin]

This is a firm Opake semivitrification, and extremely hard & smooth, rather dry than Glassy

P62[in margin]

The above experiments, and especially No 28, contrary to our Expectations shew that the Cherokee Clay instead of stopping vitrification, very easily runs into it, and makes it probable that this clay may be useful in the Composition of a Glaze for Earthen wares.

These Experiments were made upon black Plates for grounds to lay encaustic Colours upon, instead of Enamel Plates, and in a Crucible in an open Air Furnace.

No. 34

3 Cherokee Clay

1 Gypsum

1 Nitre

Pounded together and put into a Crucible in the Air Furnace, burnt to a dry Powder, not at all vitrified

No. 35

3 Cherokee Clay

1 Gypsum

1 Nitre

1/5 of the whole, Raw Borax

very fusible and produced a porous White Vitreous Mass that want a mere fire.

 

Page 83 [numbered 50 by JC]

P62 Cont'd

No. 36

6 Cherokee Clay

2 Gypsum

1 Nitre

1 Raw Borax

Produced a hard greyish White coat upon a Black plate, in part vitrified but wants Body for a Ground and with more heat blister'd

[Next number in order down the page is 38 but No 37 has been inserted in the RH margin]

No. 37

The same as 36 with a little whiting produced a hard coating that did not blister & deserves to be tried further

No. 38

The above with 1/13 part of Whiting and 1/25 part of Raw Borax gave a hard porous vitrified Mass, and laid upon a black Plate as a gro'd[ground] fired hard, but crackled, the Mass was exactly the Colour of White Venetian Beads.

I directed the following experiments to be made with a View to a Glaze for Mr Wedgwoods Biscuit Ware without Lead, or any other metallic Calx from 39 following

[heading] For a White Glaze for Biscuit Ware

No 39

8 Cherokee Clay

8 Potash

1 Whiting

Calcine these and add the Whiting

No 40

4. C. Clay

4 Sand from the Isle of Wight

1 Whiting

8 Potash

1/30 of the whole Borax

Produced a very white vitreous Mass but it was not perfectly vitrified in abo't two Hours in the Air Furnace. 

A good White Glaze, run pretty easily, & seems likely; Must be tried further

No. 41

The same as the last without Borax

Placed in the Cruciblemakers Kiln, in a . . .[buled] Crucible produced a perfect Glaze transparent greenish with few bubbles, rather Milky.

No. 42

2 C.C.calcined always

6 I. W. Sand}

1 Whiting} placed likewise in the Crucible Kiln

10 Potash}

P 64. A fine Glass, greenish, transparent, very full of Bubbles

The Glasses Nos. 41 and 42 were covered with an Incrustation of White salt of a considerable thickness, and had nearly the taste of common salts, inclining a little to the taste of Potash & under that a vitrified seum of greenish matter which had separated [sic] & risen in the furnace

No. 43

12 parts  Zaffer

16 parts Potash

1 part Nitre

1 part Arsnick [sic]

16 parts deep common smalts

2 partsb Whiting

1 part C.C.

Pounded together & put into a luted crucible, in the crucible makers Kiln 

[Transcribers note: JC seems to use a crucible in a number of different ways. A luted crucible is sealed with a clay to make it airtight, presumably a covered crucible is not airtight. He also uses open crucibles.]

No. 44

The Glass 41 Ground and mixed with Water was laid upon a Biscuit Pitcher, and produced a Fine White Glaze , that perfectly adhered to the ground run with a small degree of fire and was perfectly free from Cracks, Septr. 13 & 14th  1773.

 

Page 84 [numbered 51 by JC]

P 64 Cont'd [in margin]

No. 45 [headed] The Product of Experiment 42 used as a Glaze

This Glaze seems originally not to have had enough to vitrify it completely and it does not run so smooth, nor make so fine a Glaze as 41 with the same Fire. It should be tried in different Fires.

P 65 [in margin]

September 14th 1773

Ex 46. Placed Cream coloured Pitchers and some Biscuit Gems in a crucible with Chips of Beech Wood, lured the Crucible and put it into an Air Furnace with a fire lighted up, in which it was left 15 minutes

The Glaze of the lower surface of the Pieces was generally turned of a Shining black, with Streaks and Spots of White interspersed, but in many places the black Glaze stood in large Pustules and did not adhere very strongly to the original Glaze, tho' in others it was firmer and would neither wash nor rub off however a few drops of Sp Nitre tho' it did not . . . ferment, loosen'd this black Glaze, so that I could easily seperate[sic] it from the original Glaze beneath; The parts of this black Glaze in a microscope had the appearance of scales of black Talk - or a metallic . . .[sc?id]. the upper sides of the Pitcher were not half so dark as the Underside, nor so uniformly tinged, but they shewed some metallic Colours. The Biscuit Gems were only a little stained, as it were with black dust without any agreeable effect.

Ex 47 This experiment the same as 46 but the crucible was kept in the Fire half an hour . The effects were not materially different Enamel colours that were upon some of the Pieces were turned quite black, particularly Green, but the cream colour'd glaze was only covered with the black coating or Glaze unequally & without any Beauty

Ex 48.

This experiment like 46 and 47 only kept an hour in the Fire when the cream coloured Glaze as all over Blisters, but scarcely at all tinged with black or any other colours - and the black in the former Experiment was discharged upon making the pieces red hot in an open Crucible

P66 [in margin] 

Wheatstone [written underneath in the margin]

Ex 49

2 parts having Opake vitrescent Flour. This sample does not fument [give of fumes] with Spirit of Nitre, is whitish stained with a dirty yellow, and not chrystalizes, but a smooth surface where broken running into various and pointed Shorts, sometimes in parallel[sic] fibres, and sometimes curling round into knots.

Some of this inclines to Pink

2 parts C.Clay

1 part Quick Lime

50

2 parts C Clay

4 parts Fluor

2 Nitre

1 part Lime

51

The same as 50 with Pot ash instead of Nitre

not tried

52

The same as 51 with Spanish Barilla instead of Nitre

not tried

 

Page 85 [numbered 52 by JC]

P66 Cont'd

53 

12 parts Fluor. 6 Quick lime. 1 Borax in the Air Fuenace

very hard and does not perfectly vitrify

Expt 49.

P67

was first placed in the Crucible makers Kiln, but hardly run into Vitrification - The ingredients were not finely powdered The same Materials were taken out and better pounded and incorporated, and then placed in brown stone ware Kiln at Lambeth, and was in the whole time of the Firing about 26 or 30 Hours.

The result a light coloured not very white porous mass; but the salt these Potters glazed their ware with has insinuated itself through the suting, which was  cracked, and given the Mass, a strong Taste of Common Salt

Expt. 50

A hard Flinty Mass on some parts not to be distinguish from Chirk

 

December 3rd 1773

M. Stuart desired me to try a Sample of Cobalt put into his hands by a Friend but he is not informed where it comes from. The specimen was called calcined Cobalt, it was a dark blackish colour, nearly black, and not unlike Zaffer, it seemed to be soft powdery Earth, the particles having something of the appearance of a Colx; in which a few pieces of bluish salt might be found here and there resembling blue Vitriol. I tasted this earth, it had a most disagreeably bitter and astringent Taste, but not like either that of Alum or Copperas.

No.1

P 68

This Powder and Nitre equal parts gave only a muddy brownish colour with a Very Slight Tinge of Blue, I then suspected this powder had not been calcined, or was a Composition of Sulphur Arsenic &c with a view of making a Factious Cobalt and upon throwing some of it upon a piece or red hot charcoal it threw out strong Fumes and therefore appeared not to have been calcined, or but very slightly. We then calcined 48 grains till the matter began to grow hard and unite. It smoaked much during the calcination and lost in weight 21 Grains. This calx was tried with the following Fluxes.

No. 2

1 part Calx

1 part Rock Chrystal

1 part Chalk

3 parts Nitre

produced a fine dark blue on biscuit Ware

The same with the addition of a little White enamel made a good blue but lighter

No. 3

1 part Calx

2pt Rock Chrystal

3 parts Nitre

Gave a deep rich blue

No. 4

1 part Flint and 1 part Nitre added to the above gave also a clear rich beautiful Blue - Flint seems to enliven the blue (borax is an improper calx for Cobalt making the colour black.) This experiment is marked S4 and folded in a paper with some of the Cobalt earth.

P 69.

No. 54

Jany 1st 1774

Chalk 1 part

Pot ash 1 part

Sulphur1 part 

Arsenic1 part

Copper2 parts

Melted together in a luted crucible produced a porous mass which when pounded was of the . . .[Canon] colour of Zaffer

 

Page 86 [numbered 53 by JC]

P69 Contd

Calcined Flint two drams}

Nitretwo drams} Of the composition One Dram

Levigate [reduce to a smooth fine powder or paste] them together and set them in a covered (not luted) crucible, in the Air Furnace

Product

A Glass of bluish green colour, such as copper generally gives with other Alkaline Fluxes and consequently nothing like the blue Glass of Cobalt - marked No. 54 -  1774

No. 55

The same as above with Iron instead of Copper, and treated in the same manner produced a light porous friable body, of a dark purplish Hue, or deep chocolate colour. With the Nitre it only gave a reddish Brown colour

P70

[headed] Colour'd Grounds for Glazed Wares

First cover the cup with a thin colour laid on with a Pencil in Lavender Turpentine & fat oil dry it well & then pay it over with fat oil upon which dust the Colour in fine powder, thro' a piece of fine Linnen[sic], patting the colour on with the ffinger[sic], or a proper cushion, when this is dry the loose powder must be brushed off then fire the piece and if it is not perfectly coloured lay it over again with more colour with a Pencil & repeat the firing. The colour for this purpose must be quite opaked

P71 [in margin]

January 26th 1774 Received from Mr Shore of Snitterton in Derbyshire in consequence of my letter of the [space left] the following specimens

1 A Black Earth moist, light, soft and resembling clay, it fuments with S.N. breaks very easily into surfaces like shale with concentric Fibres, and sometime shews a Colour inclining to Olive. The black is of fine imperceptible particles. The olive part is mixed with yellowish and other colour'd Particles.

Made red hot in a crucible and kept in that state about half an hour, it was burnt to a black and light cinder not to be distinguished from the Cinders of common coals

Dried by a moderate Fire this Earth ceased to fument with Spirit of Nitre and only absorbed it. The above Calx with Nitre flamed a long time and seemed almost to be all Sulphur - It gave little colour upon the cream Glaze.

2nd An extremely light loosely adhering Earth of an olive colour, of fine Particles with small streaks of yellow absorbs Aqua Fortis greedily, but does not fument with it. part burns to a cinder and part hardens a little, with a red heat in a crucible continued half an hour. It also absorbs Water like Aqua Fortis. It mixes with Water like Fullers earth and feels soapy, and stains paper of a Brown Umber colour

When indurated [made hard] in the Fire it is not to be distinguished from a very light kind of Manganese - Pages

this burnt Earth gave a shining brown colour upon the Ware, not like the Iron colour and fluxed . . .[code]. Repeated the experiment July 29th 1775, and still it gives with the Lead flux, a light brown colour, with an olive cast.

P72[in margin] 

3rd Earth of the same general colour with the last, but much heavier, easily broken with the fingers, and full of black and yellow particles, but not hard or gritty Absorbs Aqua ffortis greedily but does not fument with it. These Olive Coloured Earths seem to have adhered to the black and are probably from the next stratum either above or below. They give the same colour in water and burn to the same kind of cinder

 

Page 87 [numbered 54 by JC]

P 73.

4th  A Fine light Earth of a bright yellow colour, friable and perfectly smooth to the touch of visible particles, it absorbs but does not fument with Aqua Fortis. burns in a moderate Fire into a fine red, approaching scarlet

In a red heat continued half an Hour one Ounce lost about 1/4th in weight and continued of a red inclining to scarlet.

this specimen is a fine light yellow Ochre excellent for Painting, and rarely met with in such purity. 

The part that was calcined used as an Enamel colour fluxes well and gives a warm red.

Mr Dall informs me, and indeed shewed me that a much more beautiful green ay be made upon the Pallat[sic] with the Ochre than with any other yellow that they have, so that this colour is available Acquisition.

P 74 Expt 

Feby. 1774 [no day given]

Engraved a vase upon a copper Plate with a piece if black Pot instead of an engraver, but the first impression is faint, tho strong enough to shew that very delicate Engravings may be made in this way, almost as quick as drawing, but never having attempted any kind of engraving before I find more difficulty than any person would do accustomed to Engraving.

A hint from Mr Cameron that the Engravings in imitation of Drawings made by Messrs Eggington Burdete &c were made by Friction and repaired by the Thumbnails, put me upon trying the Experiment, and I suppose I have thereby found out a method of Engraving different from any now in use. My Tools are certainly new, but I suppose their Tools are Files of difft' kinds

P.75

[headed] Philosophic Transactions No.465 Page 188

A Method of making a gold colour'd Glazing for Earthenware communicated in a Latin Letter from Professor Heinsius at . . .[Petyburg] to Mr Collinson

Take Litharge [lead monoxide] parts iij of sand or calcined Flint part i, pound and mix these very well together then run them into a yellow Glass with a strong fire. Pound this Glass, and grind it into a subtle Powder, which moisten well with saturated solution of Silver, make it into a Paste, which put into a crucible and cover it, give at first a gentle degree of Fire, then increase it, & continue it till you have a Glass, which will be green, pound the Glass again and grind it to a fine Powder, moisten this powder with some Beer, so that by means of a Hair Pencil you may apply it upon the Vessel (or any piece of Earthenware)  The Vessels that are painted or covered over with this glazing must be first well heated, ten out under a muffle, and as soon as the Glass runs, you must [X inserted refers below] smoke them, and take out the vessels

X afflare debes fumum

November 16th 1776 Tried this Receipt, and find it to succeed so perfectly as to leave no doubt it is the true Copper Glaze, looking like that Metal or between that and Gold.

P. 76

[headed] White Chrystaline Rock from Cornwall

Perfectly white as Chrystal but less transparent breaks into rough points, has some chrystal shoots in places upon its surface, and a dark coloured matter as a small vein in it resembling Black Jack or Copper one. This stone burns very white but has some black specks when burnt tho none appear before. It is more easily vitrified than Flint, but not so vitrificable as moor stone.

 

Page 88  [numbered 55 by JC]

P76 Contd [in margin]

[headed] Moor Stone from Cornwall

White with Opake and shining particles of Talc mixed with Granite It vitrifies pr. Sc - in a biscuit oven, and vitrifies in the Wind Furnace with a smaller addition of salts than any other of the Stone we know

P 77 [in margin]

[headed] Red Earth from the Muskets Shore

this Earth is of a pleasant red colour inclining to Scarlet, it is gritty in the Mouth, but dissolves in it, leaving a little sand, or gritty matter. it has no sensible Taste, it stains the hand & the . . . 2 dwts 16 grs ½  kept in a red heat about ffifteen[sic] minutes. the colour was but little alt'd the lumps neither broke, nor adhered much more strongly together. It lost 7 grams & did not smell of Sulphur.

Upon examining it with a glass I perceive it is very full of particles of White sand . . .

I do not perceive that it is of any use different from that of other red clays

March 4th 1775

A greyish Earth or Clay covered and mixed with a blue powder the quantity of blue increasing upon being exposed to the air, found angular in a bed amongst the coal Strata at Golden Hill near the great Tunnel in Staffordshire.

Fuments not at all or very slightly with common Aqua ffortis, with which it only turns to an Olive brown - neither the brown or the blue part of the Earth, have any Taste, it burns to a mixture of Whitish & Brown, it neither inflames nor gives any smell when red hot. It gives only a brown Colour in Enamel with various fluxes; and appears to be Iron, it was got near a large Iron Mine; but whence comes the blue colour?

P.70 [in margin]

[headed] Mr R Sharp, at Smitterton Hall near Wirksworthy Derbyshire

"London March 9 1775

Dr. Sr.

I am favour'd with your Letter of the 16th and am obliged to you for offering me a share of the Ore Concern which I have no objection to accepting; tho I had only thought of serving you and the Public in it, and have indeed little time to do anything out of the common course of my Business. I have seen Mr Middleton and had much . . . with him upon the subject and find that the Price of the yellow ore, for that is the only sort he thinks of value will depend upon its quantity, and the demand: . . . only for the use of the fines Artists, they will give  a good price but I take a small Quantity. If for the use of the common, or house Painters, they will take more and give a smaller Price. And he does not choose to Contract till he knows which of these plans it may suit, and 'till he is more generally assured of the Approbation of the Painters, and in order to ascertain this more certainly, I have given him almost all I had left to be put in many hands for further Trial; but I can gather from his Conversation that it is a good Article, and that it may be worth from 8d to 10d or 2s a pound, according to the quantity to be had, and the plan to be pursued, whether of supplying a large or small quantity. A moderate Price and a large Quantity would certainly answer better for us, than a large Price, and a small Quantity, But this will depend entirely upon the quantity you can procure, of which I wish you, as soon as possible to give me some Idea that we may fix the price. Suppose you estimate . . .

 

Page 87 [numbered 56 by JC]

P. 79 Cont'd

the price of collecting and the Carriage or Freight to London, and then let us consider of the price, and in the meantime it might not be amiss for you to send me 11lb Weight of the fine Yellow, by the way of Experiment, adding all these charges.

 

I believe here are other materials in your neighbourhood now thrown away that might be bought into use and be worth our Attention if they cod. be collected and sent to London without notice and at a moderate expense, but this like the ore will require prudence and secrecy both on your part and mine. The Specimens I brought with me from Derbyshire have undergone various experiments made by myself and Friends and not without some useful discoveries, which I am not at liberty to name. One of the materials so far as I understand the Matter is to be a substitute for another kind of stone about the Value of Alabaster, and will probably make a part of some kind of Artificial Stone Work but of this you will please to say nothing.

 

The substitute I mean is in great Quantities upon many Mine Heaps near Middleton and in other places, it is very heavy. very white when broken, with a rough surface of a chalky appearance and after has bite of Lead Ore in it, It is what the Miners all caulk, not Thevel, nor Wheat Ear. The Whitest and peest[sic] from the Lead Ore is the best of this it is probably large quantities may be wanted; but a greater quantity than has been seen by the person who intends to use it will be necessary to confirm his Experiments.

 

By way therefore of forwarding this business effectually and prudently I wish you wd. immediately send by the Carrier two or three hundred weight of it, broken down small, the Lead ore being carefully picked out, Let it be put into - good casks and directed to Mr B Metcalf in Basing Lane London, at the same time advising me by letter of the expense and when it is sent - And I wish you wd. consider at what price you can Furnish a Quantity of this material Per Ton allowing yourself reasonable profit, for your trouble, and keeping the article within a compass of a Substitute for Alabaster or Marble; and inform me in your next letter. The person who has discovered a new kind of Fire Engine for which he has a Patent and is now applying to Parliament for a further time to finish his work is a Mr Watts a Scotsman and concerned with Messrs Boulton  and Fothergil in Birmingham at whose House I suppose a Letter will find him when he is returned from London. I am sir yours &c, T. Bentley

17 calcuned Flint1 part

No. 746 Do.

22 Pipe Clay3

20 Alabaster¼ P

24 Saphire

 

P. 82

March 24th 1775

ACobalt from Bohemia

Bought of Messrs Caldwell & Co Bridge Row Canon Street 20d p lb

BCobalt roasted in a Crucible lost 2 oz and ¾ at a Pound

CThe same powdered

DFluxed with equal parts, Cobalt, Flint and nitre

EProofs of the same Colour, without any additional Flux

But would require working to have a softer Flux

This is very good Cobalt

 

Page 90 [numbered 57 by JC]

P.83 [in margin]

[headed] April 2d 1775

A Heavy yellowish grey stone from Mr Simpson of Brentershale in Derbyshire, which he supposes to be an Ore and I apprehend to be a sort of Kenil or Wheatstone, he says he can get a great Quantity of it. It does not fument with Aqua Fortis, is quite Opake, of a coarsish Grain and in some small cavities has the appearance of a vegetable or reticulated texture - It has very carefully passed thro Cramers 30th process Page 287 without discovering the least particle of Metal. And all the Fluxing matter with the Stone were converted into . . .[as did] black potash. It gives no colour in Vitrification.

 

April 7th 1775

In consequence of the Cup made transparent by the absorption of oilonent[sic] Page 32 I propose making some experiments to try whether Metallic colours may not be conveyed into the body of a Biscuit Ware by means of oil, and then fixed by the Fire.

Experiment A. A piece of White Biscuit soaked in purple enamel colour diluted with sweet oil, the colour extremely well ground

These experiments were not carefully tried.

 

[headed] June 1st 1775

We have often observed that our black ware or artificial basalites, have a great affinity with oil but this morning I have before me a very singular instance. That with respect to the volatile Oil of Turpentine, it has a sort of Attractive or Magnetic virtue, for Captain Digby has sent me two Tea Pots that were left some months in an old Cedar Boy or Cabinet with other things, which Pots have attracted the Effluvia of the Cedar, so as to have a thick coat of moist and shining Varnish regularly distributed over their whole surface. It has been collected in such quantity as to have run down the sides of the Pots of which no part of the surface or bottom have escaped varnishing. The other things in the same box or Cabinet were not at all affected with this volatile Varnish.

2. Whether this fine volatile Effluvium may not have some medicinal properties; superior to common Oil of Turpentine? Whether this method of collecting the Volatile Turpentine might not be usefully employed?

 

P. 85 [in margin] 

[headed] July 6th 1775

Mr Tresize gave me a sample of an Incrustation from the Chimney of a Burning house in . . .[commode] it is in Cakes of about ¼ of an Inch thick, of an Ash colour, shot into a sort of parallel[sic]; - - - Fibres resembling antimony and the outer surface is spangled over with brightish spots or chrystal - like Talk, it is suppose to be arsenical, but it have no taste, [!] and when red hot no smell of Garlic it is not inflammable, nor very volatile - it is probably a mixture of arsenic Tin and Phlogystion and consequently a sort of Regulus & arsenic. I shall call it Regulus only in the following Experiments.

[headed] Expt A. About an Hour in the Crucible

Calcined Flint 2} A Fine & very delicate whitish substance with a bluish Tinge, Lead4} like white Enamel, from which it appears that this substance Nitre2} blanches Glass like Arsenic, and perhaps better.

Regulus1}

[headed] Exp. B. About 1 Hour and half

C. Flint2} A White Opake substance very delicate more fusible than A. 

Lead6} but with a yellowish Tinge to the Edges. should have more 

Nitre2} Fire - 

Regulus1}

 

Page 91 [numbered 58 by JC]

P.87

[headed] July 13th 1775

From Mr Rich.d Frezises at Sithney near Helston Cornwall, sent by his Son. a Ponderous Spar of aluminated texture and of a yellowish White, it does not fument with Sp. of Nitre and greatly resembles some kind of White Lead Ore.

 

[headed] July 28th 1775

To by as  Cobalt from Mr Tolchers Mine Devonshire given me by himself this day. This Cobalt is compact heavy, of a shining Ash coloured Grain like broken cast steel, with shining black lumps or spots interspersed in the Grey ground. It has the appearance of an Arsenical Iron Pyrite

Exper.t A. Weighed 2oz 0 dm Averdupois[sic] 

Pounded it not fine, and kept it in the Air Furnace in an open crucible about two Hours - It gave out a strong smell of garlic. When it smelt no longer of garlic we cooled and broke the crucible. The roasted Ore was of a dark colour and weighed one oz 2 Dms pounded this roasted Ore pretty fine

Expt. B

Roasted ore0 ozs4 dms

Nitre10

Flint12

Hazle[sic] nut of Alum calcined. Mr B thinks this clear the colour of the blue

Size of a pea Arsenic

Luted close in a Crucible, and fluxed in the Air Furnace in which it remained two Hours it produced a yellowish brown Mass, opake and granulated, and adhering pretty firmly together without the least Tinge of blue.

Expt C.

Some of this with Lead Flux; produced a yellow straw colour upon glazed Queens Ware

Expt. D.

Roasted ore1 part} In a luted crucible, about an hour in the Fire produced a

Nitre2}greenish substance not pfectly[sic]  vitrified but no 

Flint2} Appearance of blue.

Expt. E.

The substance D. with and without the Flux produced a yellow melony to olive, upon glazed Queens Ware, so that one wd. rather be inclined to think this an Ore of Silver than Cobalt

P. 88.

[headed] July 13th 1775

From Mr Frezise with the spar 87.

A White Indurated Clay approaching to the nature of Jasper, without the least Mixture or Stain of any other Colour. It is in broken Lumps with a channeld[sic]  and wavy surface covered over with a beautiful White Glaze, like the Glaze of fine Porcelain, the inside breaking like Mats It does not fument with Spirit of Nitre

This is from a vein in a Tin Mine about 20 Fathoms deep.

 

Page 92 [numbered 59 by JC]

P. 88 [in margin]

[headed] November 3rd 1775

[headed] Experiments lately made by Mr Rhodes for Glazes & Porcelain bodies

No. 27

A strong white heat in a crucible & in a Smiths Fire

Moor Stone 8 .. 0} Mixed and ground together, vitrifies on the Bristol Ware, does not Whiting       2 .. 0} crackle, is hard and promises to be a good Glaze, does not flow freely upon a White Ware Biscuit

No. 28

Moor stone 8 .. 0} Vitrifies on the Bristol Body, flows well, but crackles where it is

Blue John    2 .. 0} thick, it runs freely upon the White Stone Ware

No. 29

Moor Stone 8 .. 0}

Blue John    2 .. 0} Rum but hard, and not quite clear, with the same fire as 

Prepared Gypsum 1 .. 0} the above

No. 30

Moor stone 8 .. 0} Fluxes but is hard and not clear

Gypsum      1 .. 0}

No. 31

Blue John 8 .. 0} Runs freely but gathers in Lumps, the blue john pierces the 

Moor stone 2 .. 0} Crucibles it imbibes of dissolves the biscuit it is laid upon and

vitrifies the parts dissolved in its own body

No. 32

Blue John8 .. 0} Fluxes as freely as 31 and produces the same effect

Quartz2 .. 0}

P.89 [in margin]

No. 33

Quartz 8 .. 0} Hard and dry - very white, parts adhered together may 

Prepared Gypsum1 .. 0} deserve trying in a body

No. 34

Quartz 4 .. 0} Flows well on the Bristol Body, is a very good colour, and very

Blue John4 .. 0} transparent seems rather disposed to crackle with one part Whiting it flows still better, & seems not liable to crackle

No. 35

Quartz 8 .. 0} Hard did not vitrify - White - the parts adhered together 

Whiting 2 .. 0]

[headed] Trials for Bodies in the Smiths Fire

No. 36

Calcined Flint4}

Blue John1}White body but too soft

Pipe Clay1}

No. 37

Moor stone4}

Flint4} Blisters in the Smiths Firs#

Pipe Clay1}

No 38.

Flint6}

Whiting1} Blistered and runs

Pipe clay1}

No. 39

Moor stone4}

Flint4} Moor stone and Flint do not agree

Soap rock1} this composition blisters

No. 40

Quartz8} 

P Plaister1} Too soft like the rest

Soap rock3}

 

Page 93 [numbered 60 by JC]

P90 [in margin]

[headed] Expt Contd.

No. 41

Quartz4 . 0}

Soap R.2 . 0} Too soft

No. 42

Quartz8} for a Glaze

Blue John2} Vitrified but too hard

No. 43

Quartz1} Vitrifies but not clear and Glassy, with a yellowish Tinge

Kevel1}

No. 44

Moor stone8}

Whiting2} rather too hard and not clear

P. Plaister1}

No. 45

Moor stone3} Vitrifies but rather too hard and yellowish

Kevel3}

No. 46

Moor stone8} Good Glaze upon stone ware. Bristol body much the same as 34

Blue John4}

No. 47

Moor stone8}

Blue John4} Another good Glaze upon the Bristol body

Whiting1}

No. 48

Moor stone4}

Blue John4}Vitrify well together but don't run flat

No. 49

Moor stone4}

Flint4}

Blue John1} Intended for a Body but vitrifies too much

Pipe Clay1}

P. 91[in margin]

No. 50

Flint8}

Blue John4} Intended for a Body but too soft

Pipe Clay1}

No. 51

Quartz4}All these bodies were only fired in a Crucible with a moderate

Pipe clay1} heat in the Air Furnace. A White Porcelain body

No. 52

Quartz8}

Caulk4} A very white Porcelain Body but dry for want of more ffire[sic]

Plaister2} deserves a further Trial

Pipe Clay1}

No. 53

Quartz aloneA fine white transparent Body stand perfectly flat but has had a very moderate heat. With a strong fire it burns extremely clear and white

No. 54

[headed] A Glaze fit for a soft Body

marked 51 on the piece

Blue JohnWith a little Glass and Borax. Flux Glass itself does not agree with these Bodies. The above two bodies crackle when alone, But add Quartz, and it will become a perfect Glaze, the proportions to be further Ascertained.

 

Page 94 [numbered 61 by JC]

P. 92 [in margin]

[headed] November 21st 1775

[headed] From Mr Powell Brecknockshire

A very light Earth of a middle drab colour, got in large lumps and which Mr P thinks is limestone decayed. it appears to be a rotten stone, such as is got near Bakewell in Derbyshire, and much used for polishing. it absorbs Aqua ffortis but does not fument with it.

[headed] From the same Gentleman

Pipites interspersed with particles of Sulphur does not fument with Aqua fortis

[headed] From the same Gentleman

A light black Earth, the Surface of the Pipites which seem to be the Pyrites decayed, it absorbs & does not fument with Aqua ffortis.

P. 93 [in margin]

[headed] December 6th 1775

[headed] A Pleasant Blue black for Gems

12 parts fine smalt 5/p Oz or £4 pr lb}When the Smalt is fine this requires no Flux

1 part Umber burnt black}

[headed] December 8th

Mundic from Newfoundland given me by Mr Stewart - a solid shining Lump , 

This Mundic loses about ¼ in roasting the rest appears to be Iron and gives a . . . deep Chocolate Colour in Enamel

The powder is black

Expt. 55 [in margin]

Quartz alone pounded and , mixed up with water in a Crucible. in a Smiths Forge. Scarsely[sic] hardened

No. 56 [in margin]Moor Stone alone Pounded spoild[sic] with smoke

P. 94 (A) [in margin]

Moor Stones , near the West end of William Trethewic's Land called  Gonemara[sic] in the Parish of Saint Stephens. This stone rises in joints as in other Quarrys of Stone, They have sunk about 15 Feet deep in one Quarry, and the Stone seems to grow better & better This specimen is one from the Quarry they have worked, but is supposed to be better

(B) Moor Stones of the Best kind from a part of Lord Falmouth's Estate joining to the West end of Trethewics Land. Mr Griffiths says this is better than Mr Pitts & that there is an immense quantity of it, Not far from this place by the Gunwear Water Mr Griffiths says there is plenty of Clay.

(C) Washed clay from William Trethewics Land near the Brook side

P 95 [in margin]

[headed] January 8 1776

Quartz4} In a moderate heat in a Wind Furnace makes a fine perfectly white

Derbys Clay1} Body, but not firm and strong, apparently for want of more fire

     this I think is the Whitest porcelain Body I have ever seen - 

No. 57

Quartz3}

D. Clay1} a Porcelain Body but not very white or firm

 

Page 95

[numbered 61 by JC]

P 95 Contd

No. 50or

Quartz3} 9}

D.clay1}3}A porcelain body transparent white, & very firm; but rather 

Whiting of the whole     short of ffire

1}1}

No. 59

[headed] Barilla

A.

Quartz8} Pounded fine together in a strong Smiths ffire, in two luted Crucibles

Barilla1} A white porous mass, united but not vitrified.

B. The above with 1/5 th } Mr Rhodes thinks Alkaline Salts are not proper to Pipe Clay} enter into the composition of Glazes that are to be

Gave a good white} fluxed in a Coal Fire, because the Sulphur of the

Porcelain body} Coals unites with the Salt and spoils the Glaze.

No. 60

Quartz8} a vitrified White porous Mass

Barilla2}

No. 61

Quartz8} Run into a Glass thro' the Crucible

Barilla4}

P. 96

[headed] February the 9th 1776

No. 1. Scotch Quartz I sent to Mr Wedgwood and pass'd thro' their hottest Fire at Etruria

No. 2. Quartz pebble A piece that has passed the Fire with the Fellow piece not fired

These do not appear to have been much affected by the Fire.

Some of the pieces only appearing rather more Opake or Whiter.

3.4.5.6.7.8. All samples of Moor Stone that have passed the same Fire as the Quartz.

the last number alone is partially vitrified.

The rest seem only to be rendered more friable, and most of them appear to be so adulterated with the Cockle or feruginous spots, as to render them unfit for a principal Ingredient for Porcelain

10 A White Cameo (Faustina or Scantilla) made with a Mixture of ¼ lb and some of the ffine clay I had from Mr Frieze p. 88

11. A White cameo (Young Hercules) 1954 made with ¼ lb and fine white clay from Mr Copes Estate near Brassington Derbyshire

Neither of these seem quite fired enough, the former Whiter. No. 11 has a blush of Pinks.

 

Page 96 [numbered 62 by JC]

P. 97 [in the margin]

[headed] Glazes upon ¼ Biscuits

[Transcribers note: The layout on this page is slightly different from previous pages. The numbers are centralised with a short line either side of them. Three columns have been drawn lightly in pencil but not headed]

1

Pounded Biscuit9 parts}In a Crucible in a Smiths Fire vitrifies a little

Whiting 1p1 part} but is too hard

2

Quartz4 parts}

Blue John4 parts}Ground fine, in a Smiths Fire produced a Whiting1 part }Spongy white Mass - To be used as a Glaze.

3

The last No. }

used as a Glaze }

 

4

Blue John4 parts }

Quartz2 parts }

Glass of Borax flux1 part }

(Whiting0 - ½  }

5

Blue John1}

Soap Rock1} Two[sic] hard for the Body

[page ruled off]

P 99 [in margin]

[headed] February 21st 1776

Received from Mr Wedgwood a piece of 2270 Biscuit Ware that had passt[sic] thro' their strongest ffire with some of our Glaze upon it No. 34. P 89 which had not fluxed at all upon firing the same piece in a close Crucible in a Smiths ffire about 10minutes it flowed into a fine Glaze.

I shall return this to Mr Wedgwood.

Another piece with no glaze upon it made with Glass Spar instead of B John, fluxed in Blisters and does not seem likely to be useful.

Upon a soft Biscuit sent up by Mr W some time ago2 Flint Glass }

1 Lead Flux} Vitrified 1 Soap Rock} together

In a moderate heat in an Air Furnace gave a pleasant soft Glaze which will also stand a strong heat.

Soap Rock has fluxed by itself upon two pieces of biscuit in the Smith's Fire.

Soap Rock seems likely to be a good ingredient in Glaze.

 

Page 97 [numbered 63 by JC]

P. 100

[headed] March 1st 1776

A Gentleman lent me a piece of Prossoantico, about ¼ of an Inch square and abt. 2 ½ Inches long, it is of a uniform dull red Colour, when polishd like Danish coloured  Mohogony[sic] It is not of a very fine grain, and takes but a moderately fine polish, but when not polished the red appears to be interspersed with small white particles, which give it a uniform speckled grain, the red however considerably prevailing over the white. Upon Examining a polishd side with a small magnifier, I observe some obscure blackish Veins like those on good ole mahogany. This stone fuments strongly with Spirit of Nitre.

[headed] April 19th 1776

Major Holland his Majesties Surveyor General of North America gave me a specimen of pretty good Cobalt from a vast Mine of that kind which lies near a navigable river in Connecticut New England.

This specimen with a piece that had been roasted, and the blue Glass and enamel Colours produced from it are marked Cobalt Page 100.

[headed] November 16th 1776

P.101

I wrote out the recipe Page 75 and ordered Mr Rhodes to prepare the materials that we might try it. Accordingly he prepared the materials according to the prescription exactly.

Experiment 1st

Crucible

When he poured the Glass of the second process out of the Crucible he flogisticated what remained in the Crucible according to the Receipt, and the Glass at the bottom had a beautiful metallic Appearance between the Colour of Copper and Gold.

Mr Moore told me that Mr Crisp had tried this Receipt, but it did not succeed with him.

[headed] November 18th 1776

Expt 2

I have laid the Colour upon a black lead which did not succeed - being flogisticated I suppose hard in too close a Vessel - But ithay[sic] succeeded upon a piece of black biscuit, & upon &ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots; piece of white Biscuit, and upon a green Glaze by holding the Piece in the open ffire over a bit of smoaking deal just thrown in

The Chief art seems to consist in a proper manner of fumigating the Ware or applying the Philophston.

I fancy it must be smoked in a Current of Air, that is in a Muffle with an hole at the bottom, and another at the top; In this manner I suspect whole Kilns of Ware may be flogisticated.

P. 102

Expt. 3

Painted two saucers one black and the other Cream coloured and placed them in a small iron Kiln with some bits, proofs They were placed upon their Edges. And soon after they were red hot we took out the Fire, and pushd bits of Deal thro' a pipe into the bottom of the Kiln which filled it full of smoke

 

Page 98 [numbered 64 by JC]

P.102 Contd

that came out at the upper hole in the front of the Kiln.

The specimens will shew how far these have succeeded. I fancy I laid the colour on too thin and that we fumigated while they were rather too hot, by which means some of the Phlogistion is burnt away.

the Pitcher Green and cream colour, that has a fine metallic[sic] stroke upon it, was accidentally Phlogisticated by touching a wooden Bench while it was hot.

Expt 4th

These head is of black biscuit and the seal were fired in an Iron Tube in the Air Furnace lying upon an Iron Quarter Tube that could be put in and taken out at pleasure. When they were just red hot we took them out, and in the open Air touched the Edges of them all round with a bit of deal, and the colour laid on converted into a Metallic Glazing almost instantaneously.

In this mixture there was added one extremely small quantity of Borax the Head with a spot behind was laid in Oil; the other with water.

P. 103

Expt 5th

A teacup (broken by accident) done as the last with a very little Borax This cup when red hot was drawn with the Iron Quarter Tube, near the Mouth of the Tube in which the cup was fired (which Tube was open at Both Ends) but not taken out and being inclined with its Mouth to the Air, when its redness was gone off, the end of a Deal stick was pushed into the inside of it, and the smoke of that the Glazing was Flogisticated , and proved a very fine Metallic Copper colour

Expt 6th 

Two seats with shanks of the same, one red and the other black, we cover'd with very metallic glazes between the colour of Silver and Copper.

In this Experiment, a small quantity of iron was added without any material Alteration in the Effect.

P. 104 [in margin]Several other Experiments have been made, according to the first Process, but with the Addition of a little Borax, Tin and Iron.

The Tin and Borax seem useful Additions, and the Iron has no bad Effect, for these Experiments have in general succeeded better than those without these Additions.

The Tin particularly seems to give body to the Colour.

Some cups have been painted with this . . .[pretalis] Enamel that have come out very well the Painting being of a pale shining Copper Colour like burnish'd Gilding.

P. 105 [in margin]

[headed] March 24th 1777

Received from Mr Wedgwood a Specimen of Cobalt that he had bought in Staffordshire which came from Germany by way of Athena. This Cost 3d/pt lb, and it now sells for two guineas pr lb This Cobalt is Polyedrical[sic], with shining surfaces, of a shiated and lamdated [erased] Texture

The . . .[shid] of the several Faces running in contrary directions, where broken steel grained, without any mixture of stone, and with here and there spots of Copper Ore or Sulphur, between the cubrical shoots of which the masses consist. the colour resembles that of a Polished silver but is a little darker.

Roasted 3 pr . 1 Ir } Gave out a strong smell of Garlic

lost only 1 Ir      } Left a dark powder like Zaffer

This Gives a deep Blue with Flux, but I have not yet found out a good Flux nor the proportions to such Cream colour.

 

Page 99 [numbered 65 by JC]

P. 107 [P.106 is not listed]

[headed] June the 8th 1779 Surpham Green

By my removal from London to this place, and many other Circumstances, My observations and Experiments have been interrupted or not Entred[sic].

On reading Boerhaave's Chemical History of Fire, Some of the Principles he investigates, led me to think of a new construction of Potters Furnaces which I apprehend will be much better than any of those hitherto in use. The Following sketch will give an Idea of it and then I shall point out the Advantages

 

[Transcribers note: The drawing is very rough. I have described below it as a flat drawing since none of the parts are labelled. I guess that it was so familiar to JC that this was not necessary. the drawing takes up about 1/3 of the page.

 

In the centre is an inverted triangle within which is a circle which touches all the sides. From each straight side a pair of parallel lines are drawn. On the end of each of the lower two pairs is a vertical post. Part way along the right hand pair of lines is what I have taken to be a representation of the edging stones of a vertical stone doorway. Round the central triangle but a little way from it is a roughly drawn oval which is drawn behind the parallel lines.

Written to the right of the drawing are the words "A third Chimney behind & a third Fireplace"

 

Having read the description below my guess is that the parallel lines are meant to represent flues and the vertical posts chimneys and fire places, the heat/smoke of the fires being directed through the flues to the central kiln (the oval at the centre of the drawing)]

 

When the Fire Flues are placed on the sides of the Kiln, above half the fire is lost by exerting its force outwardly upon the brickwork - Fire always expanding itself in diverging - Radii from the centre of the Heat. That Center[sic] should therefore be in the middle  of a Kiln, and then the Ware will receive all the Heat. The Ground Flue in the middle should be made of Saggers with Holes in the bottom placed out of a direct Line, to interrupt the too hasty escapes of the Fire, and the sides should be as thin as possible to facilitate the lateral expansion of the heat, while the outer Walls should be of a White matter on the inside, and extremely thick to reflect the heat back again to the Center prevent its Escape.

P. 108 [in margin]

The discharging chimneys or Pipes should be below the reflecting lock, that the Heat may likewise be reflected downwards from the Top, upon the Ware before it makes its Escape.

The distance of the Center Chimney from the Fireplaces will likewise be of great use in burning the Smoke before it begins to ascend, and the great heat at the union of the three bottom Flues, will not fail to convert into pure Flame, what may not have been compleatly enflamed in the bottom Flues. All unburnt Smoke escaping being a loss of so much Fuel, and of the heat that would have been derived from it, if perfectly enflamed. Such a Kiln as this, I think, wo'd be far more perfect than any in use, &  require much less Fuel, and the produce the same Effect.

 

Page 100 [numbered 66 by JC]

P. 109 [in margin]

[headed] July the 19th 1779

By the Experiment or rather Observation Page 32, and by other Observations it appears that burnt Earths have great Affinity with Oils, and are extremely absorbent of them. And by the Circumstance of the Two Teapots mentioned P. 84 one wd. be inclined to think there was something like a magnetic Attraction between them, may not this principal be applied to some practical use?

Try whether pounded earthenware, and boild[sic] Linseed Oil, or Oil Varnishes will not unite, and make a hard stone without fire.?[sic]

[headed] August 29th 1779

As Doctor Priestly has found that Nitrous acid and almost any kind of Earth, or metallic Calx make pure diphlogisticated Air. Might not the Air of a sick room or a Hospital be much improved or changed, by gently throwing in Fumes of Nitrous Acid, which would unite with and neutralize or change the volatile Alkaline, or putrid matter which floats in and corrupts the Mass of Air in the situations referred to? Or possibly the vitriolic acid might do this more effectually, and precipitate the phlogistic Matter in a solid Sulphur.

If either of these experiments should succeed it wd. be a discovery extremely interesting to humanity.

Might not we be negated after Dinner with a supply[sic] of pure Air, much more agreeable and healthily than Incense, by means of a small Lamp, to be fixed under a Vessel resembling an Incense pot in which dephlogisticated Air may be generating, or in which the Nitrous Acid may be separating[sic] by means of the Vitriolic?

 

P.110 [in margin]

[headed] February 24th 1780

I think I have this morning discovered the Principle upon which Elastic Stockings may be made upon a Stocking Frame like those that are Knit upon Enquiring into the Cause of the difference between Knit and woven Stockings, with respect to Elasticity, I find it is the custom to Spin the Jersey much harder for Knitting than weaving and that the difference chiefly arises from this circumstance. - Thus - The Fibres of Wool spun slack lie almost straight and at their full stretch, so that they can expand no farther, and consequently cannot contract or possess the property of Elasticity, but the Fibres of hard spun Jersey compose a set of spiral Springs that press against each other, and admit alternate expansion - elongation and contraction, that is they possess the property of Elasticity.

This being the Case, why do not the Hosiers avail themselves of this Principle? perhaps first because tho' it seems so obvious now it is pointed out, they may not know it As I have often thought slightly on this Subject, without finding out the reason of this - remarkable difference between Knit and woven stockings. Which is now discovered by a regular Investigation, and not by Accident.

And secondly because the Jersey spun hard or much twisted is shorter and dearer than the soft Spun Jersey , and probably is not quite so manageable in the Frame. Upon the knowledge of this principle a great Improvement in the Stocking Manufactury[sic] may be established.

Jersey spun finer and cheaper and better twisted upon Machines will do the business and make an entire Revolution in our Manufacture of Worsted Stockings.

 

Page 101 [numbered 67 by JC]

[headed] Lead Ors

9 Dishes of well washed and clean Ore go to a Load

1 Dish Weighs about 4 ½ Stone ----- 6s lb (abot. ½ Ct. 120 to the Fid. -)

Between 7 and 8 Loads produce -------8 Pigs

Or one Todder  of Lead - each weighing 22 Stone -----

[rest of page blank]

 

Page 102

[blank]

 

Page 103

[blank]

 

Page 104

On the 1st. day of January 1791 commenced my connection with Mr Enoch Wood in the manufactury of Earthern Ware & a new set of Works were soon after begun to be erected.

 

Page 105

1791

Miscellaneous Observations Expers. &c.

15th Dec 1791.

No.1. Is a piece of Quartz procured for me by Mr. More, the Secretary to the Society of Arts and Sciences, through the Intervention of Mrs. Bentley, & received by me the 14th Decr. 1791. The specimen was said by the person from whom it was obtained to be a foreign one, & he informed Mrs. B. that there was no English Quartz. The name "Dominica" is marked upon it. There is reason to believe, however, that Quartz is met with in Derbyshire, where it is called Quartz Spar, or Quartz Chrystal(sic); though all the Specimens which I have yet been able to procure, by no means correspond in Appearance or Quality with this sent me from London. The . . .[Cutler] in the common culinary Fire as well as in a much stronger Heat crackles & flies, & burns to a dirty brown, whereas the former stands the fire without flying & is of a most beautiful Whiteness, both before and after it has undergone the Heat. Mr More says that there are large Quantities of Quaztz(sic) [quartz] in Wales, and that in the Island of Anglesey there is a Rock of it. In this I am induced to believe that he is right, from a very rough & bad specimen which I picked up myself in October last, off the common Turnpike Road, at the Calemel Mines, near Holy Well, in Flintshire. This specimen is so strongly impregnated with Metallic Substances as perhaps to be utterly unfit for the purpose of Manufacture, but I make no doubt but that much fairer Specimens might have been procured at the same place, had I taken time to look

 

Page 106

for them, and it is extremely probable that there are large Quantities in other parts of the Country less impregnated with Metals. On putting this Stone into the fire, it neither crackled nor flew like the Spar; and on taking it out, after suffering it to remain red hot for about ten Minutes, I found a number of parts in it equal in Lustre & Whiteness to the Quartz, & the colour of which on a comparison could scarcely be distinguished from the other. The Metallic parts even with this Heat had the appearance of being vitrified, and I should suppose might by means of a much stronger be either dissipated or consumed so as to leave the Quartz . . .[pure] and fit for use. But this; I propose to try, by exposing it to the greatest Heat I can obtain at the Manufactory.

 

No 2. Is the Quartz from London after having stood about 10 Minutes red hot in the common culinary fire.

 

No. 3. Is Derbyshire Spar.

 

No 4. Derbyshire Spar after having under gone the Heat of the Ovens at the Manufactory.

 

No. 5. The Specimen before mentioned to have been picked up near Holy Well.

 

No 6. The same after having been kept red hot in the common fire about 10 Minutes.

 

Page 107

[Blank]

 

Page 108

[blank]

 

Page 109

[Blank]

 

Page 110

1794

August 31: On this day I returned from Nantwich, where I had been since Thursday last for the purpose of avoiding the Hurry necessarily attending a removal from one Habitation to another, and took possession of our Dwelling at Linley Wood. The pains that had been taken to provide for my comfortable reception was the first consideration which struck my mind, and called forth all that lively gratitude and affection, which never fails to animate our Hearts, on receiving proofs of Kindness and attention from those whom we esteem & love. A spontaneous prayer to the Author of all Happiness proceeded from my Lips, that she, my Eliza, the Source and partner of all my earthly Bliss, might here herself enjoy, those pure and perfect pleasures, which to refined & virtuous Minds a Country Life is so fitted to afford, and for which in the bustling scenes which we have quitted she had expressed many an ardent wish. Not for herself alone, but equally for me. For me, who through ten years

[entry not completed]

 

Page 111

[blank]

 

Page 112

[blank]

 

Page 113

[top half of page torn out, rest left blank]

 

Page 114

[top part of page torn out]

1794

Septr, Saturday 20: The Morning very stormy & wet. Spent the greatest part of it in Business. & writing opinions upon two Titles. Read the life of Drake contained in a Volume of Miscellaneous & fugutive pieces, of which I believe Johnson was the Editor, & Writer of this Article. Curious fact related in it of Thomas Doughtie, who having been sentenced to Death for a conspiracy against the

 

 

Page 113

[Page heading] September

General, & having his Choice offered him of either being executed on the Island, set on Shore on the Main Land, or being sent to England to be tried before the Council, after a days consideration, chose the first; and being . . .[astisrelated], obstinately deaf to all persuasion, and adhering obstinately to his first Choice, after having received the Communion and dined cheerfully with the General, was executed in the afternoon, with many signs of Remorse, but none of Fear.

In this Book is the following passage; "This perhaps a just Observation, that, with regard to outward Circumstances, Happiness and Misery are equally diffused through all States of human Life. In civilized Countries, where regular Policies have secured the Necessaries of Life, Ambition, Avarice, and Luxury, find the Mind at leisure for their reception, and soon engage it in new pursuits; Pursuits that are to be carried on by incessant labour, and whether vain or successful, produce Anxiety & Contention. Among savage Nations, imaginary wants find, indeed, no place but their strength is exhausted by necessary Toils, and their passions agitated not by Contests about Superiority, Affluence, or Precedence, but by perpetual Care, for the present day, and by fear of perishing for want of Food" p. 211.

 

Sunday 21: Read for the first time the Service which I had compiled, or rather extracted, for the use of the Family, from a Book entitled the Universal Liturgy, printed for Millar in 1761.

[rest of page cut off]

 

Page 114

[Page heading 1796]

[Transcribers note: Some entries on this page are simply numbered 1, 2, 3, etc I have rendered this as 1st. 2nd. 3rd etc in order that the days stand out. Where a day of the week has been given I have included it as given.]

April, 9th: Returned from Chester.

 

10th : At home. Sunday. Mr Blunt came in the Evening. Conversation on Catholicism. Excellency of that of the Church of England maintained by W. B. Chiefly on the ground of the precision & clearness with which it enforces the moral duties. This the chief thing for Children. Idea of God merely a matter of faith. But g. if such a Catholicism as Houghton's not preferable, by giving more comprehensive ideas of the Deity, declared from his Works &c. & thinly filling the mind with more sublime ideas of his powers & Goodness & by that means, hither his passing it for the observance of his Laws.

 

11th: At home. Unwell. Winds cold. north & north west. Turned two Cows out into the Croft at the Farm. One cost £8.8.[8 guineas] the other £6.7.6.

 

12th, 13th, 14th: At home. Unwell.

 

15th: Hannah set off to Birmingham

 

16th: Set Soot upon some of the Rushes in the Meadow. Agreed with Stringer for the Chimnies at 2 Guin. Pr. Annum.To be swept as pften as required.

NB. The rushes were not mown before the Soot set on. Observe carefully the result of this process.

 

17th: Sunday

 

18th: Monday. Newcastle Concert. Returned home. Turned 12 Sheep & 4 lambs into the Large field.

 

19th: Engaged with Mr Tomlinson previous to the general Meeting

[Rest of page cut off]

 

Page 115

[by deduction this is part of the entry for Friday, 22nd April]

its members the opponents of Mazarine, were called Frondeurs. As every thing was of late, a la ballon; so soon after that distinction was adopted Bread, Hats, Gloves, Handkerchiefs, Fans, Trimmings, -  every article, in short, of use of luxury, was made a la mode de la Fronde.

De Bitz; Memoirs, Eng. translation. Vol 1. p. 437

 

Saturday 23: At home. Mr Blunt came to dinner. Walked in the afternoon to Alsager, to see the improvement in the Meadows. Fine Evening.

 

Sunday 24: Read one of Pyles Sermons. Plain, rational discourses well adapted for the use of families.

 

Monday 25: At Newcastle & Burslem. Met Mr E. Mayor at the Calter place by appointment & also called upon Mr Poole. Long conversation relative to his affairs & the reference with Mr Edleston. Returned home to dinner. Mr Blunt came in the Evening accompanied by Mr Bent. Conversation on Mrs Blunt's case. Comsumption & its proper treatment. The high system strongly recommended by Mr Bent. Bark, animal

food & nourishing diet not excluding a little ale or wine to be taken whenever the fever off, & the patient felt an inclination for food. Not to consider any symptoms as marks of fever except chilliness & succeeding heat. Emetics to be taken every morning on waking. From 6 to 20 grains of Ipecacuanha [root of a S. American shrub used as an emetic or purgative] as the patient finds requisite so as to procure gentle vomiting once or twice. The exercises of swinging to be taken moderately. Beneficial by accustomising the patient to currents of air & thereby preventing the liability to be affected by changes.

 

Tuesday 26: At home. Mrs Blunt began the system recommended by Mr Bent. Much better in the Evening. Mr Wood dined. Mr Blunt came in the Evening. Turned Changeling & the roan horse out for four or five hours. Fine day. Warm & dry.

 

Page 116

[Page heading] May

Taxes on Manufactures particulary injurious by requiring a larger Capital to be employed: By exposing the Secrets of the Manufacture in the collecton of the tax - and by giving the less scrupulous or such as practice any fraud or coersion in respect to the payment of the Tax an advantage over the honest & fair Trader.

 

[heading] March 1797

Tel homme a du gont pour l'Architecture & sait depiner, il fera tres bien le plan & le dessein deinpalais; faites le . . . executer, s'il ne exait la coupe des primes & sil ne exait apeir ses fondemens, tout edifice s'ecrouler bientot,

Avant propos. Reveries de Comte de Saxe

 

18th: At home. Gardening. Morning milder. Writing lessons. Sowed some of Pritchetts seeds. Neopolitan & Sardinian Brocoli; Vanderglins Borecole [Kale - from the french Du boerenkool, peasants cabbage]. Florentine Lettuce, Barcelona Lettuce & common coss(sic) Lettuces.

 

[Transcribers note. The following days and dates, which are transcribed as given, appear to give April 31 days!]

April 25: At Newcastle. Took the oaths as Deputy Lieutenant with Mr Mainwaring & Mr Headman.

 

April 26 : Mr & Mrs Lawton dined here. Heavy rain all day.

 

Wednesday 27: Turned 14 Sheep into the field before the House. Also 13 Gs. at Leek fair the 18th from which time they had been on the Stubble & Wheat. In the Evening changed them to the high grounds.

 

Thursday: At home. fine warm day. drawing, writing &c.

 

Friday: Do. busy in Accounts. Do. Do.

 

Saturday: Do. received at night some Mackerel by the Mail coach, which on being taken into the dark presented a most beautifully luminous appearance. The paper which had brushed them also produced the same effect and appeared to be flakes of an extremely fine blaze.

 

Sunday: At home. fine warm day.

 

May

Monday 1: At home. Cold. Hail & rain. Wind N.W. Alcock did not come. Busy in accounts.

 

Page 117

[Transcribers note: Some entries on this page are simply numbered 1, 2, 3, etc I have rendered this as 1st. 2nd. 3rd etc in order that the days stand out. Where a day of the week has been given I have included it as given. Also note that the page is headed 1796, however May 2nd was a Monday that year hence if the days are correct this should be 1797]

 

[Page heading]1796

Tuesday 2: At home. Wet.

 

Wednesday 3: Mr Wood came. went with him to the flint Mine. he staid to dinner & went home in the Evening. Long conversation on the subject of the Manufactory & the reduction of prices lately adopted. Weather showery but warm & pleasant . . .

 

4th: The extreme wetness of the weather prevented my attending the Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting at Trentham for the Muster of the provisional Cavalry. Engaged all morning with the Children's Musick, writing & accounts.

 

5th : At home. Do.

 

6th : At Burslem. carried Eliza on the brown Mare.

 

Sunday 7: At home. weather still cold.

 

Monday 8: dined at Butterton with Eliza. Mr Skerrett came. staid all night. At home.

 

Tuesday 9: Miss Stamford returned from London.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Mr Skerrett returned this morning.

 

Thursday 11: Do:

 

Friday 12: At Burslem. Colliery business.

 

Saturday 13: Mr Blunt came. Staid all night. turned two cows out into the croft. One cost £10. the other 6 & 14 sheep into the field before the house.

 

Sunday 14: At home. Much rain all the last week, but the latter end dry. wind N.E.

 

Monday 15: At home. Engaged with Alcock &c.

 

16th: At home. Do. Violent rain with Thunder & Lightening.

 

17th: At home. still wet. but mild & warm.

 

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[Page heading] 1798

May 1st: Attended at meeting at Alsager relative to raising a volunteer Corps. Adjourned to Tuesday 8th.

Turmed out 2 cows into . . .[Trinocks] Land. Cost £22

 

2nd:At Newcastle. Slept at Mr Fletchers. Musick.

 

3rd: Went from Newcastle to Burslem. Attended meeting relative to raising Volunteer Corps. Mr Skerrett came to Linley in the Eveng.

 

4th: At home. Afternoon Trout fishing.

 

5th: Do. Angled with Mr S in the Bath Pool but no success.

 

6th: Mr S left us in the Eveng.

 

7th: Attended the Annual Meeting of the Trustees of Alsager Church for the first time since any being chosen a Trustee in the room of the late Rd. Wilbraham Borth Esq.

 

8th: Attended Meeting at Audley for raising a Volunteer Corps adjourned to Wednesday 16th at Betley.

 

9th: Attended Meeting at Odd Rode for the same purpose.

 

10th: The Willetts came.

 

11th: At Burslem.

 

12th: At Bastwick House. Fishing.

 

13th: Sunday

 

14th: Attended Lietuenancy Meeting at Trentham.

 

15th: The Fletchers with Mr Swinnerton & Mr Wm. Sneyd dined.

 

16th: At Betley. attended Volunteer Meeting which was my . . . when a Corps was agreed to be raised. Myself Captain. . . .[T or ?J Landford] Halsall & Handright Lieutenants.

 

17: At home.

 

18: 14 Sheep & 4 lambs from Leck fair cost 16:7

 

19: At Barlaston met Mr Mainwaring Capn. Mainwaring & Rogers. 

 

20: Went to Betley relative to the Volunteer Corps.

 

21: At home.

 

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22nd: At Newcastle

 

23rd: At home. Messrs. Yates & Kiding relative to Carters business.

 

24th: Do. employed in making close walk through the lane. Mr Wood came.

 

25th: Do. Do.

 

26th: At home

 

27th: At home

 

28th Newcastle fair. bought a cow. dined at Mr Admams with Mr Sneyd. Saw the two O'Connors on their road to Ireland.

 

29th: At home. weather very dry. Wind N.E. 

"However some Men may declaim, there was a time when the founding of Abbeys and Monastries was the most political method by which the monarchs of Europe could introduce civilization amongst the barbarous subjects. And however ill adapted to the present times, that old monopoly, the institution of corporations, was at one period highly political, and absolutely necessary to support infant commerce against the surrounding oppressions, and uncommercial spirit of the feaudal system." Portuguese Asia. Int. to Mickles Lasiad.

 

As to the reform of Parliament, I think Mr Pitt has discharged his promise, and the very reasons which have provoked some of my Brother Reformers, as with me the strongest motives for admitting his sincerity - To expect that the minister of a great, and above all a corrupted state like this, should calmly and deliberately demolish the whole frame of government for the sake of making an experiment, is betraying a lamentable ignorance of human nature. I am not myself such a child as either to expect or wish that all government should stand still in such a wonderfully complicated system of Society as our own, in order that two or three reformers may try their skill in greasing the wheels.

Life of Day p 68

As to myself; I am no more ashamed of supporting a

 

Page 120

good than of opposing a bad government; both kinds of contact must alternately flow from the same spirit, and in this, like everything else, the last and wisest conduct is placed between the two extremes.

Ibid.

 

The author of the above work (Mr Keir) speaking of Mr Day says "His maturer reflexion(sic) also suggested to him, that good and evil were so blended in human affairs, that one arose often inexpectedly from the latter; that governments were sometimes obliged, by the prejudices of the people or by the interests of individuals to withold part of the good which they wished to accomplish, and to permit evils, the correction of which would be followed by some still greater evil; and he accordingly became more indulgent towards men in power for the little good which they generally effected." Ibid p.70

 

Page 121

blank

 

Page 122

[Written sideways in the LH margin and subsequently overwritten by the date below]

as I know to be the case If these effects have by one particular succession of Causes & effects been produced, why may not the same or similar effects be produced any time by the operation of the same or similar causes, or by further & . . .  . . . exercise of Almighty power?

vid. Beatties Evidences of the Christian Religion.

 

[Page heading] 1799

January, Monday 21: I this day attained the age of 40. Horae quidem cedunt et dies et Mensis et Anne; sed praeteritum tempus nunquam revertitur, necquid sequator sciri polest.

There was a time, when the matter which composed my body was as void of life, as it will be when it has lain twenty years in the Grave; when the elementary particles whereof my eye is made up, could no more enable a percipient Being to see than they can now enable me to speak; and when that which forms Substance was as . . .[mint] as a . . .[Form] yet now the first lives, the last moves, and by means of the second I preceive light & Colours.

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Drawing. Resumed the Reading of Saleys Evidences. Mr Penlington on his affairs.

 

Wednesday 23: At Cobridge on the reference of the Case of Parr & Robinson. Called at Burslem. Experiments on the application of Metallic Glazes going in with fair appearance of Success. Severe, snowy day.

 

Thursday 24: At home. Engaged in ordinary occupations.

 

Friday 25: Mr Penlington & Mr Collison on their affairs. Mr Edwd. Kirling. Received a letter from Mr Ward relative to the further progress of the Glazes.

 

Saturday 26: Went to Burslem. Engaged all morning relative to the metallic Glazes, adjustment of Colliery disputes &c. Examined old witnesses relative to Sr. Thos Fletchers claim to a cottage on Coalpithill.

 

Sunday 27: At home. Paley

 

Monday 28: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 29: Burslem. Metallic Glazes. Experiments promising Success considered of a Patent. Writing long letter with a state of the Case to Peake.

 

Wednesday 30: Burslem again. Same business.

 

Thursday 31: At home. Adjusting Accounts &c. Mr Cox. Britain relative to the Cottage. Severe weather. Snow and wind.

 

February, Friday 1:At home. Storm of snow & wind with severe frost.

Mr Colquhoun in his Treatise on the Police of the Metropolis computes that the property & money in constant Transit within it, in the course of a year is 170 Millions. That there are 115,000 persons who support themselves in and near the Metropolis by pursuits either criminal, illegal,

 

Page 123

Feby. 1799

or immoral. That the interchange of property by means or Gaming is no less than £10,460 annually. He says in a Note. "the Gambling and Lottery Transactions of one Individual in this great Metropolis, are said to be productive of from ten to fifteen Suicides annually." He concludes his Book with the following Observation.

"The depredations committed will cease to be a matter of Astonishment when compared with the vast property that is constantly afloat; and on the whole, the wills, are, perhaps, not to be imputed so much to the increased or general depravity of the human character, as to the deficiency of the Laws; in not advancing pregressively in the means of prevention in proportion to the introduction of Luxury, and the additional temptations which the influx of wealth, and the intercourse of Commerce occasion in every country." p.441. 5th Editn. 1797

 

Saturday 2: At home.

 

Sunday 3: At home Mr John Gurnett. Severe frost.

 

Monday 4: Do. Do. & Alcock Do.

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Blunt. drawing Do. Bessy came

 

Wednesday 6: Do. Do. Do.

 

Thursday 7: Do: Do. with snow

 

Friday 8: Do. Violent wind & snow

 

Saturday 9: Do.

In Arthur Youngs view of Suffolk Agriculture lately published is the following "Account of the number of inhabited houses, servants, horses, and carriages, as assessed to their several duties in England & Wales in 1796."

[Transcribers note: The columns of the following table have been vertically ruled and the headings of the subdivisions of the horses and carriages columns entered vertically. The totals are ruled off.]

ServantsHorsesCarriages

For pleasure For HusbandryFour wheelsTwo wheels

Houses under 6 windows354,391

From 7 to 10 Incl160,084

          11 to 15 do.  61,473

          14 to 19 do.  61,356

          20 to 24 do.  19,898

          25 & upwards  31,642

699,84456,850178,784900,70019,07024,305

 

Sunday 10: At home. read the usual service. Fine mild day & thaw

 

Monday 11: Do. Drawing &c, Tempestuous Night & heavy fall of snow. received Peakes opinion on a patent for the metallic glazes.

 

Tuesday 12: Do. In the 51st Edwd. 3d. (1377) it was found that the Population of England & Wales amounted to about 2,092,978 souls, in 1483 to about 4,688,000; at the revolution (1688) about 6,500,000 or 7,000,000, and at present (1787) probably to near 8,000,000.

In the year 1377 the population of London was found by enumeration

 

Page 124

to be 33.000 souls, and that of Westminster 10,000

In 1588, the Navy of England contained 31,335 Tons and       15,272 Marines

In 1688101,032 Tons & from 30 to 45,000 Mariners

In 1781422,760                      104,978 Marines

At the end of the reign of Chas 2d. Poors rates amounted to &665,302 in 1776 to &1,566,804

During the last four years of King Williams reign, the revenue of the Post Office amounted on an average to £83,319; and arose by a gradual progression, till in the year 1784 it amounted to £452,404.

vid. Chalmers's Estimate of the Comparative strength of G. Britain published in 1786, a Book which from the number and importance of the facts which it states, should be read by all political Speculators, particularly such as incline to the gloomy and desponding notions of the late Dr. Price and his Followers. W.C. has been at great pains to prove by a variety of examples that nothing deserves to be so little relied upon as the opinions generally disseminated by political writers concerning the prosperous or unprosperous state of the Manufactures & Trade of the nation, at the time of the publication of their works, since it appears that many men of great character & eminent abilities have frequently represented the nation as being in an uncommonly declining state at the very moment when (as W.C. contends) it was enjoying an extraordinary degree of prosperity. Herrenschevard in his discourse on Population for instance states it as a notorious fact that since the loss of America our trade thither & consequently our manufactures have greatly & alarmingly declined, and yet W.C. shows that in the year 1771, 1772, 1773 our average exports to the American Colonies amounted to the value of £3,064,843 and in 1784 to £3,359,864. So easily may Men believe what they have preconceived should naturally come to pass.

Vid the Monthly Review of this book, March 1787.

 

Wednesday 13: At home. Thaw. Mr Wood came to dinner.

 

Thursday 14: Do. Do. Mr Wood - busy in various small experiments on the metallic glaze - Drawing &c.

 

Friday 15: At home. Mr Wood went early.

In length

The Duke of Bridgewater Canal27 Miles

Grand Trunk all100 

Staffordshire & Worcestershire  (Canal to the Severn)46

 

Page 125

Coventry Canal37Birmingham22

Oxford87Fazely17

Leeds & Liverpool100Erewash12

Thames & Severn with the Stroud37Stourbridge Dudley Droitwich18

Monthly Received178

Sea Freight of Clay to Liverpool11/6Freight by Canal9/.

Crates to Liverpool 2/6

EstimateMiles long}

Rochdale Canal£291,9003 1½} Fulton on Canal

Ellesmere Do.£400,00057} Navigt. published

Kennet & Avon Do.£420,00070} 1796 p. 27 Note.

Grand Trunk in Do.£500,00090}

Leeds & Liverpool£800,000129}

 

The Speaker of the House of Commons, Mt Addington, observed in his Speech in the House of Commons on the Union with Ireland on Tuesday last that "full two thirds of its whole population are Catholics, and yet eight tenths of the prosperity of the Country are rested in the Protestants, who alone are eligible to trusts and offices under Government"

Vid. Star of Wednesday the 13th  inst.

 

Saturday 16: At home. On this day died my old and worthy friend Janus Robinson, after a long tedious illness. He was one of the first persons with whom I formed a friendship on my entrance into life, which I date [rest of line cut out]

on July 1777. From that time the most perfect intimacy subsisted between us: nor for a period of nearly two & twenty years did the smallest crossness or misunderstanding ever raise betwixt us. Great good sense, coupled with sterling honesty & a peculiar frankness & kindness of manners commanded the respect & . . . they secured to him the affections of a numerous and respectable circle of friends & Acquaintances by whom he is deeply & deservedly lamented. He fell a Martyr to a glandular Complaint contracted by the preparation of Cobalt a material branch of his business.

Mr Wm Bent & Mr Blunt dined at Linley. The former coming to consult me on the Brewery Concerns.

 

Page 126

Sunday 17: At home. Spent as usual. bought a black cow from Waldlate.

 

Monday 18: Heavy Snow. Alcock however came & Mr R. Skerrett.

 

Tuesday 19: Fine mild day. Began plowing(sic) the . . .  . . .[hanky pail] in the Hollins Ground. Revd. Mr Salmon on his affairs with Mr Penlington.

 

Wednesday 20: Mr. Skerrett & Major Skerrett came here.

 

Thursday 21: At home with Do. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Friday 22: At Newcastle with Do. dining with Mr R. Skerrett.

 

Saturday 23: Mr S & the Major returned to Nantwich leaving us all much pleased with the latter. Mr Wm Bent. Martha & Blunt Bilkely & Best. This day agreed with Wm Dale for a new lease of 9 yrs. of the Alsager Estate at £250 clear

Fon mihe res, sed rebus me submittere conor.

Mr Josiah Potts came in the Evening.

 

Sunday 24: Mt Potts left us after dinner. Bone dust best applied on cold grass Land. About 30 Bushels per acre, laid on in the Spring, about the middle or later end of March.

 

Monday 25: At Burslem. Alcock. Received & began to read the Jesuits perspective, recommended by Mr Barber.

 

Tuesday 26: At home. James Wright came. Valued the Ash proposal [beginning of next line cut out]  Eliza &c went to Newcastle.

 

Wednesday 27: Eliza &c returned with Miss Willett.

 

Thursday 28: At home. Ordinary occupations.

 

March, Friday 1st: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 2: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 3: Do.

 

Monday 4: At Newcastle relative to the redemption of my Staffordshire Land tax. From thence to Longport & Burslem. Came home to dinner. Alcock.

 

Page 127

[Transcribers note: Dates transcribed as written in the diary. Numbered days do not run consecutively - no 9th - correction by JC occurs on page 128]

Tuesday 5: At Nantwich. Major Skerrett. Land tax &c.

 

Wednesday 6: Returned with Major Skerrett to Linley. An amusing & instructive Ride the Conversation turning on Tactics engineering &c.

 

Thursday 7: Thursday at home with the Major

 

Friday 8: Miss S & the Major & Bess went to Nantwich.

 

Saturday 10: Saturday at home. Blunt dined. much Conversation. returned with Miss Willett with them during her stay at Linley I had had a great deal of interesting Conversation relative to her intended marriage with Mr Turner.

 

Sunday 11: At home. Capn. Sneyd came after dinner but staid & spent the day engaged to attend on Wednesday sennight to swear in the Burslem Volunteers as a Deputy Lieutenant.

 

Monday 12: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: Do. Mr Cox.

 

Wednesday 14: Do. Mr Jos. Wedgwood - various matters. much Conversation Mr McIntosh's Lectures &c the General Change in the public Opinion on French politics &c. &c.

 

Thursday 15: Walked to Newcastle with Eliza, dined & stayed at night at Mrs Willetts, arranging various matters for them. Messrs. Chalkely, Spode & Tomlinson relative to the appointmt. of Commercial Commrs. for the Potteries under the . . .[marine] Bill. appointed to meet again on Saturday at Newcastle. Mr Jos. Wedgwood . . . tea & spent the evening with us at Mrs Cox.

 

Friday 16: Returned home

 

Saturday 17: At Newcastle agreeable to appointmt. From thence to Wolesley bridge with Mr Spode to speak to Mr Sparrow of Bishton relative to the Nominat. & appointment of Comm. Commr. & returned home at night.

 

Page 128

[Transcribers note: Dates written as entered in the diary. Note correction to numbers from 24th.]

Sunday 18: Mr Wood came to dinner. Staid all night.

 

Monday 19: Heavy Snow. Mr Wood returned. Alcock. Miss S returned from Nantwich with A.C. 

 

Tuesday 20: At home.

 

Wednesday 21: At Bradwell dining with Mr Wm Sneyd. From thence to Burslem attesting the Volunteer Corps, as a Deputy Lieut. returned home at night.

 

Thursday 22: At home. usual occupations.

 

Friday 23: Do. Do. laid the Bone & Hair Dust had from Birmingham on the Land in the front of the House. 

. . .[Sewed] by hand.

 

Saturday 24: At Newcastle. Eliza Miss S & I dining at Mr Sparrows. The Willets Leut. Gibson Mr Bent.

 

Sunday 24: At home

 

Monday 25: Stone Navigt. Meeting.

 

Tuesday 26: Do. Genl. Assembly. returned home at night.

 

Wednesday 27: At Burslem. received by express intelligence of the death of old Mr Crompton of Chorley who died the night preceding in consequence of falling near the fire by which his feet & legs much burnt.

 

Thursday 28: Miss S & I set off for Chorley. Stopped all night at Knutsford.

 

Friday 29: At noon arrived at Chorley Hall found the Dr &c.

 

Saturday 30: Attended the funeral &c. Dr. Taylor, his Son Robt. & JW Pilkington dined.

Quid, quoque et cui dicas, caveto.

 

Sunday 31: Miss S & I went to Revington drank tea with Miss . . . returned at night Miss S staid at R. 

 

April, Monday 1: Left Chorley Hall. took up Miss S at Revington & arrived at home at 8 o'clock at night. Bent . . .  . . . that the Pools would run Clear,

 

Tuesday 2: At Burslem &c relative to the income Bill & the appnt. to be delivd. in. For several days past the wind has been uniformly in the North east, most severely cold accompanied with Snow in Sleet & hard frost so as to prevent the least appearance of vegetation.

 

Page 129

and the Country every where having the appearance of the month of January in a severe winter. Straw & Hay very scarce & dear. The former 4 or 4/6 p Cw. the latter 5. Joshua brought home a Cow for feeding Cost 8 Gnes. Mr. Dale, Waller the . . . [spor] &c

 

Wednesday 3: At home much engaged in settling Income so as to deliver a Statemt. under the Act. Severe cold day, with wind. Frost still continuing.

 

Thursday 4: At Newcastle & Burslem. Eliza & 1 dined at the latter place having left Miss S at Mrs Willetts. Returned in the Evening. Mr Fritch. Severe cold with Sleet. Settled the return under the Income Bill.

 

Friday 5: Weather so extremely severe this morning with wind & snow that Mr F detained some hours. Snow before the door & in some part of the Ground drifted from 3 to 4 feet deep much engaged in completing my private return under the Income Bill which I returned to the Assessor this day.

 

Saturday 6: Mr Blunt dined. Recd. from Mr Jos. Wedgwood Mr McIntoshs discourse on the Study of the Law of Nature & Nations, Much conversation with Mr Blunt.

 

Sunday 7: At home. Service &c as usual. Read Mr McIntosh's Book which meets my unqualified approbation as it seems admirably adapted to restore good sense to Politics, instead of these wild theories & fantastic though imposing speculations which have so long bewildered the undertakings, and disturbed the peace & safety of Mankind. The sentiments expressed in this book are literally those which I have myself invariably entertained & firmly & unequivocally expressed through the awful period of the French Revolution: believing, both now & always, that fact & experience are the only sure guides in the application of Philosohy & Law to the regulation of human affairs;

 

Page 130

and that the business of a Legislation consists, not in the framing new & visionary systems, but in the just adaptation of General Laws & principles to particular cases, circumstances, & situations.

 

Monday 8: Snow. At home. Alcock. Musick as usual.

 

Tuesday 9: At Newcastle. Basford. Hanley & Burslem. At Hanley on account of the rejection by the Grand Jury of the application for Comml. Commrs. made by the Pottery, & the correspondence which had passed between Mr Sparow & myself on the subject; in consequence of which the Sherriff had at Mr S's request advertised another Meeting to be held on Friday next; when it was determined that some leading Gentlemen out of the Potteries shd. attend such Meeting.

 

Wednesday 10: At home. Very wet. Mr Bent.

 

Thursday 11: At home.

 

Friday 12: At Stafford with Mr Wilson Mr Chatterley & Mr Tomlinson. attended Meeting when the appointmt. of Comml. Commrs. given up unless appointed for other parts of the County: as it might subject the Pottery Commrs. to act for other manufacting parts.

 

Saturday 13: At home. receiving Mr Penlongton's  rents. engaged with the Tenants & him all day.

 

Sunday 14: At home as usual.

 

Monday 15: Do. Alcock. Heavy Snow this morning for Act. per  . . . [Low]

 

Tuesday 16: Do. Began ploughing again in Mrs Johnsons Land. Fine mild day.

 

Wednesday 17: Dined with Captn. Sneyd at Bradwall. R Williamson. From thence to Burslem swearing & attesting the Burslem Volunteers. Longport.

 

Thursday 18: At home.

 

Page 131

Friday 19: Mr Wood & Mr Thos. Wedgwood. The latter relative to giving up Deeds belongong to one Hall. when I appointed to meet Mr. Poole Atty. at Burslem on Friday next. Miss S & Lissy set off this morning for Birmingham on their way to London.

 

Saturday 20: At home. Mr Blunt dined & staid at night. 

 

Sunday 21: Do. Being unwell Eliza read a Sermon to the Servants. Mr Cox.

 

Monday 22: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At Burslem agreeable to appointmt. Agreed with Mr Wood to go to Cornwall & Devonshire.

 

Wednesday 24: At home.

 

Thursday 25: At Newcastle relative to paymt. of for Land tax Dr. Thos. Fletcher relative to Britains Cottage refered to my determination & various other matters. Began sowing 4 Acres in the Hollins Ground but stopped in the afternoon by rain & wet.

 

Friday 26: At home.

 

Saturday 27: Do.

 

Sunday 28: Do.

 

Monday 29: At Burslem. Sir George Youngs service sent away returned to dinner. Alcock. Miss Potts & Miss Willett returned with Eliza from Newcastle in the Evening.

 

Tuesday 30: At home.

 

May, Wednesday 1: Do. Mr Wood relative to various matters.

 

Thursday 2:Do.

 

Friday 3: At Nantwich with Eliza. Mr Skerrett signed the Bond in Comptons admon. returned in the Evg.

 

Saturday 4: At home. began sowing Mrs Johnsons field. cold dry morning. Oats at Nantwich 4/10. Wheat 12/- Hay 10/- p. Cwts.

 

Sunday 5: At home.

 

Monday 6: At Alsager Heath attending annual Meeting of the Trustees of Alsager Church. Mr Twiss Mr Rowley & myself. Continued sowing though rain in the morning but dry afternoon.

 

Tuesday 7: At home. finished sowing oats & began sowing Grass seeds but prevented by rain.

 

Page 132

Wednesday 8: At home. unwell with a Cold. Much rain but mild & growing day. Sold Mr Johnson of . . .[Forlow] 12/3 cw at 9/- but the running price 10/-.

 

Thursday 9: Do. Alcock

 

Friday 10: Do.

 

Saturday 11: Do. Fished the Pool at . . .[Torhads]. In the Evening Mr Skerrett from Nantwich relative to the purchase of Lands at Nantwich behind the House. Finished sowing grass seeds.

 

Sunday 12: At home. Mr Skerrett returned in the Evening.

 

Monday 13: Do. Blunt came to breakfast. Alcock. much Conversation relative to the Dispute with Mr Hollins concerning the . . .[organ] Salary. when I fixed to go to Newcastle on Wednesday to endeavour to settle the matter. Joshua bought a Cow at Congleton fair.

 

Tuesday 14: At Burslem. Mr Wood & Mr T Wedgwood returned with me to dinner.

 

Wednesday 15: At Newcastle engaged with Hollins & Alcock. returned to dinner.

 

Thursday 16: At home

 

Friday 17: Do.

 

Saturday 18: At Newcastle with Eliza signing Bond &c. in the Prorogation Court in Cromptons admon. Drank Tea at Martins

 

Sunday 19: At home. Fine Day. Began reading Lord Clarendons History.

 

Monday 20: Do. Alcock. Fine day but heavy showers. wrote to Mr Jos. Wedgwood amongst other things to thank him for McIntosh's Book of which I expressed myself as follows

"Permit me to take this opportunity of thankng you for Mr McIntosh's Book which I have read with singular pleasure. It appears to me, indeed, to display throughout the happiest union of spendid talents with sound judgement and extensive knowledge, nor do I know how to form a better wish for the Author or the Public, than that he may live to execute in all its parts the noble, useful and reasonable work of which he has here given so beautiful and masterly a sketch. To one I must confess, it could not but afford peculiar gratification to find the same leading principles of morality & Politics which I have invariably held and endeavoured to act upon thus forcibly vindicated and also greatly expressed; as well as such

 

Page 133

truly critical justice done to those Authorities from whence I have derived whatever little knowledge of the Subject I myself possess, and to whom I must always look up as the "Great Masters" in that Science on which depend the Order and Happiness of the World."

In page 25 Is not superficial Sciologist a Redundance?

Began setting potatoes for winter crop in the Store.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. Cold windy day.

 

Wednesday 22: At Newcastle on Alcocks business. From thence to Burslem. Rolled the great Meadow.

 

Thirsday 23: At home

 

Friday 24: Do. Messrs. Gibson Sneyd Sparrow Bent & Blunt dined. Remarkably high wind & cold.

 

Saturday 25: At Newcastle again relative to Alcocks business. Returned to dinner. Miss Willett & the two Miss Sparrows dined. Mr Wood also came. Much Conversation with him.

 

Sunday 26: At home

 

Monday 27: At home

 

Tuesday 28: Took Eliza to Burslem in the Afternoon in the Chair.

 

Wednesday 29: At Do. to Newarth to meet Miss Stanford & Lissy on their return from London. Drank tea at Mrs Willetts.

 

Thursday 30: At home. Turned out 5 feeders & 2 milkers into the Barkey field under the Wood. Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 31: At home

 

June, Saturday 1: At Newcastle

 

Sunday 2: At home.

 

Monday 3: At Newcastle . . .[??executing] Bond in Cromptons Admon. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 4: At home engaged in preparing Articles &c previous to the Marriage of Miss Willett with Mr Turner. Cold Stormy day.

 

Page 134

Wednesday 5: Miss Harwood Ann & Bessy came from Nantwich. Mr Turner Miss Willetts & Mrs Holland also dined. Engaged in settling Mr Turners affairs.

 

Thursday 6: At Burslem. Took Bessy in the Gig. fine day. Changed the Feeders in the field before the House.

 

Friday 7: At Newcastle on act. of Mr Turner & Miss Willetts. Atty. Mr . . .[Tryboyne]

 

Saturday 8: Do. Attending their marriage. They set off from the Church for Newcastle upon Tyne. Returned early to Linly. Mr Blunt dined. This is the 15th anniversary of the happy union with my Eliza. with what

[sentence not completed and space left]

 

Sunday 9: At home. Read the service as usual. In the Evening took Miss Harwood in the Gig as far as Wentheath. fine Evening.

 

Monday 10: At home. Alcock. Began draining the smaller hanky field in the Hollins Ground & setting Winter Potatoes.

 

Tuesday 11: At home.

 

Wednesday 12: Do. Mr & Mrs Wood dined & returned in the Eng. Mr Thos Garnett came to dinner & staid all night.

 

Thursday 13: At home.

 

Friday 14: Do.

 

Saturday 15: At Burslem. Fixed with Mr Wood who had had a slight return of his Rheumatic Complaint to go to Burslem on Tuesday 25th.

 

Sunday 16: At home.

 

Monsay 17: Set out with Eliza . . . Lancashire on Acct. of the Admon. of the effects of the late Mr Crompton.

 

Wednesday 19: Returned home & brought Miss Noble along with us having settled every thing amicably with Mr. C. Long political Conversation with Mt Duckworth of Manchester

 

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Thursday 20: Mr & Mrs Shepherd & Miss M Nicholson with Master Wakefield arrived in the Evening. changed the feeders into the wood field.

 

Friday 21: At home engaged with the party.

 

Saturday 22: At home. Mr & Mrs S &c left us in the Morning.

 

Sunday 23: At home. Peas. I this day observed in pod.

 

Monday 24: At Newcastle on various matters. In the afternoon Mr E Keding.

 

Tuesday 25: At home

 

Wednesday 26: Do. In the afternoon at Burslem.

 

Thursday 27: At Burslem

 

Friday 28: At home.

 

Saturday 29: Do. Sir. Tho. & Lady Fletcher & family with Messrs. Gibson & Bent dined. pleasant day.

 

Sunday 30: At home. Changed the feeders & milkers into the field before the House.

 

July, Monday 1: At home. Miss Watkins came. This day we heard the cuckoo at about ½ past 6 oclock in the Evening. Still warm night with the appearance of Rain & Thunder.

 

Tuesday 2: In the morning called upon Mr Watkins at Willock. Alcock & his son. Mr Wood & Mr T Wedgwood dined. Mrs Morris &c in the afternoon - much pleasant musick.

 

Wednesday 3: At Newcastle Races. dined at the Crown. In the morning at Butterton.

 

Thursday 4: Do. Dined at the Roebuck

 

Friday 5: Friday Mr. & two Miss Wood dined - got potatoes for the first time. singular Instance of the lateness of the Season.

 

Saturday 6: At home. Spread more lime on the Hollins field - fine showery weather.

 

Sunday 7: At home.

 

Monday 8: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 9: Set off for Birmingham. On horseback to Stafford.

 

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[Transcribers note. 1 week omitted]

Tuesday 16: Returned home from Birmingham leaving Eliza & Miss Stamford at . . .

 

Wednesday 17: At home. found the men had begun draining in the Hollins Ground. fine & dry but appearance of more rain which had fallen here very heavily for some days past.

 

Thursday 18: At home. much rain.

 

Friday 19: Do. Alcock

 

Saturday 20: Do.

 

Sunday 21: Do.

 

MOnday 22: At Newcastle

 

Tuesday 23: At home. Began make alterations with Farm yard. & enlarging the water

 

Wednesday 24: Do. engaged with workmen &c.

 

Thursday 25: Do. Mr Blunt. sold two Cows to Hockenhill for £31.10.

 

Friday 26: At home.

 

Saturday 27: Went to Rudyard Vale to look in the Reservoir. Mr Wood Mr Collins & Mr. Blunt. Messr. W & B. dined at the George. Leek. On my return found Peake who had come early in the day. began to seed the Clover.

 

Sunday 28: At home.

 

Monday 29: Do. Rain.

 

Tuesday 30: Mr & Mrs Wood & Miss Grainger R. Robinson & T Wedgwood dined at Linley Wood. Fine day & a very pleasant party. Delivered to Mr Robinson out of his Deeds Mr Blurtons Undertaking to . . .  . . . an Assignmt. of a term of years in the Estate purchased by him.

 

Wednesday 31: At home mowing.

 

August, Thursday 1: At Burslem. Mrs & Miss Wedgwood & Mrs & Miss Willett dined Mrs. W & Mrs Wedgwood & Miss Wedgwood staid all night. At noon instant Storm of Hail & Rain with Thunder.

 

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Friday 2: Mrs Wedgwood &c staid to dinner & left us in the Evg.

 

Saturday 3: At home. In the Morning fishing in the Bath Pool violent rain.

 

Sunday 4: Do. Rainy afternoon.

 

Monday 5: At Sandbach attending Meeting of the Commr. of Linley Lane Turnpike. Dined Col. Frost Mr Salmon &c. heavy rain in the afternoon with Thunder.

 

Tuesday 6: At home. Fine morning. Spread . . . the Clover. Engaged to go to Burslem, but prevemted by the rain in the afternoon. Mr Peake Miss Noble & Miss S went in the Carriage.

 

Wednesday 7: At home. Alcock.

 

Thursday 8: Do. Sold the white Heifer for £16 to Barker.

 

Friday 9: Do.

 

Saturday 10: Do.

 

Sunday 11: Do

 

Monday 12: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: Do.

 

Wednesday 14: Took Peake to Stone on his way to London to which place he was obliged to return. Returned home in the Evg.

 

Thursday 15: At home.

 

Friday 16: Engaged all day at Talk as Foreman of the Jury at a Copyhold Court passing Childs . . .[Jarndes] &c found a verdict that double fees are not payable at special Courts. Mr Wood came in the Evg. to forward to Bicton.

 

Saturday 17: Detained at home by a violent storm of rain & wind all day the weather more resembling in every respect Novemr. or Decemr. than August. Maid did not arrive at night.

 

Sunday 18: Set off with Mr Wood for Buxton

 

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[Transcribers note. 2 weeks omitted]

Saturday 31: Returned from Buxton. During our stay at which place we had only one day without rain. This day the wind & rain were so violent that between Buxton & Leek we were apprehensive that the Chaise would have been blown over.

 

September, Sunday 1: At home. fine day but a slight shower in the Evg.

 

Monday 2: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 3: Went to Congleton to meet Mr Buchan, with whom I had formed an Acquaintance at Buxton & who came to spend a day or two at Linley. Returned with him in the Chaise to dinner.

 

Wednesday 4: At Burslem with Mr Buchan. fine day & busy mowing.

 

Thursday 5: Mr Buchan returned to Buxton. Engaged in the Hay.

 

Friday 6: At home busy in the Hay

 

Saturday 7: Do: Sold 2 Cows to Lander for £29 one cart £5.5s the d. £8.8s.

 

Sunday 8: At home. Dr. & Mrs Crompton Miss Crompton & 3 children arrived in the Eveng.

 

Monday 9: At Sandbach attending Turnpike Meeting pursuant to adjournment. fine day & busy in the Hay.

 

Tuesday 10: At home. finished the Hay harvest, which terminated finely & favouably.

 

Wednesday 11: Dr. Crompton left us on his journey to Derby.

 

Thursday 12: At Burslem with the Ladies. Retd. to Dinner.

 

Friday 13: At home. Mrs Crompton & family leave us tomorrow. Every day's experience & observation, concur with that Father of Judgment which I possess (whatever it may be) in leading me to consider as above all things most injurious to social happiness that spirit of it be wanton & licentious Innovation which quits time & fundamental principles in order to pursue fantastical & visionary schemes of reformation &

 

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singularity.

 

Saturday 14: Mrs Crompton &c left Linley. fine day.

 

Sunday 15: At home. fine day.

 

Monday 16: At Newcastle fair - purchased 2 cows. Mrs Skerrett came.

 

Tuesday 17: At home. Mr Skerrett.

 

Wednesday 18: At home. engaged in the morning by appointment with Mr Harssells relative to his Sons intended Marriage. Lissy & Mary went to Betley.

 

Thursday 19: At home. Mr Funaley

 

Friday 20: At home. Alcock

 

Saturday 21: At Burslem

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: Do. began cutting oats.

 

Tuesday 24: Do. Mr Skerrett retd. to Nantwich

 

Wednesday 25: Do. busy in the oats

 

Thursday 26: At Burslem. Mrs Skerrett & Eliza

 

Friday 27: At home. Mr Cox was to have dined but did not come

 

Saturday 28: At home. Mr Blunt with his pupils Mr Norriss & Mr Brazier & Mr Wood & Mr R Skerrett dined. wet morning.

 

Sunday 29: At home. cold damp day.

 

Monday 30: At Newcastle on various matters. began again cutting

 

oats which the unfavourable weather had stopped.

 

October, Tuesday 1: At home.

 

Wednesday 2: Mr & Mrs Watkiss dined.

 

Thursday 3: Musick. Mr Alcock Frith Bugnall & T Alcock

 

Friday 4: Mr & Mrs Sherett & Miss Noble retd. to Nantwich

 

Saturday 5: At home

 

Sunday 6: Do. 

 

Monday 7: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 8: Mrs & Miss Peake arrived with whom engaged for some days.

 

[Transcribers note: several days missing]

 

Sunday 13: Mrs & Miss Peake left us.

 

Monday 14: At home. Alcock

 

Tueadsy 15: Went to Stone to adjourned General Assembly.

 

Wednesday 16: Returned from Stone.

 

Thursday 17: At home. Miss Wood came.

 

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Friday 18: At Newcastle on Mr Tho Baddeleys affairs. Finished carrying wheat. dined at Mr Gilberts with Mr Lawton. violent rain at night.

 

Saturday 19: At home. Mr Wood. staid all night relative to Railway &c.

 

Sunday 20: Do.

 

Monday 21: Alcock. Mr & Miss Woods left us.

 

Tuesday 22: Dr Cromptons family arrived with Miss Wakefield on their return from Dorchester.

 

Wednesday 23: Out all morning shooting with Dr Crompton. who killed 3 brace of birds. fine day.

 

Thursday 24: Dr Cromptons family left us. Delivered to the Dr. Mr Gen. Taylors . . .

 

Fruiday 25: At Burslem with Miss S. Railway in great forwardness. 

 

Saturday 26: At home. engaged receiving Mr Penlingtons Rents, Mr Penlington with Mr Blunt his pupils Mr Brogan & Mr Jessop dined.

 

Sunday 27: Do. My friend Hassall arrived at noon.

 

Monday 28: Do. Engaged with Hassall. Alcock &c.

 

Tuesday 29: Went with Hassall to Burslem. Mr Wood returned with us to dinner but left us in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 30: Hassall left us on his return home. engaged with Mr W Hassells relative to his intended Marriage, sealing proposals &c. &c.

 

Thursday 31: At home. fine day. busy in the fallow ploughing & preparing for sowing wheat. Mr Fritch.

 

November, Friday 1: At home indisposed. Wet day which stopped sowing Wheat. Sent Mr Martin Mrs Wilkiss's Deeds in Mortgage to Miss Crompton which I had received from her.

 

Saturday 2: Very wet morning which prevented my going to Bagnall as I had appointed to with Mr Davenport & Mr T Sparrow to ascertain the damage done to Mr Val. Close by the late breaking down of the Reservoir. Engaged all day in looking over & arranging Letters papers &c.

 

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Sunday 3: At home. At night very high wind.

 

Monday 4: Do. Engaged in arranging papers &c. A Hare this morning came curiously into the Kitchen where the Servants were at Breakfast, & being pursued by the Grey hound (Catch) which happened to be lying by the fire was killed by her at the entrance into the wood. Sent it by Stamford to Mr Wood. Day so wet that little progress could be made in the sowing wheat & getting up potatoes. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Day so wet as to prevent sowing &c. In the afternoon Mr Martin sent by Mr Jones the princl. £500 owing on Mortge to Miss Crompton from the call Mr Watkiss. Began writing a few observations on the use of Perspective as applicable to the common purposes of drawing, for the benefit of the Children.

 

Wednesday 6: At Newearth to meet Mr Davenport relative to the Navg. Business. Finally settling Miss Cromptons &c. Eliza took three Children Ann Emma & Louisa to Mr W Bents in order to take the Measles.

 

Thursday 7: At home. dry cold day. engaged all morning writing Letters &c. 

 

Friday 8: At home. Do.

 

Saturday 9: At Newcastle attending meeting of Mr Close Mr Robinson & Mr Thos. Sparrow & others settling damages sustained by means of the breach in the Bignall Reservoir. all day.

 

Sunday 10: At home. As an add. proof of the extreme & singular inclemency of the late season I this day got a . . . [Mospark] Apricot off the tree at the farm which was not yet ripe.

 

Monday 11: At Burslem. Railway proceeding well. so far finished as to admit of Coals being carried to the works. returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 12, Wednesday 13, Thursday 14: At Stone attending meeting of the Navgn. Committee but a sufft. number did not attend. Engaged there all day on Wednesday. dined & spent the Evening with Mr Robinson. engaged in perusing various Navgt. papers &c. particularly in relation to the proposed increase in the Salaries of sevl. Clerks. On Thursday Morning went to Sandon relative to a division of the wine &c. belonging to

 

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the Archery Society, which was done. Mr Sneyd of Barrow Hill Mr Edwd. Sneyd of the Forest Mr Chas. Wolsley Mr Blount Mr . . .[Someruiler] & self attended & dined. Returned home in the Evening. Remarkably fine day: so much so that we . . .[bowled] 2 hours before dinner.

 

Friday 15: At home fine day. Sowing wheat. Engaged in the afternoon with Wm Dale & Mr Tho. Baddely of Newearth on his late Mothers Affairs.

 

Saturday 16: At home. Fine dry Morning.

 

Sunday 17: Do. Mr Wood came on the afternoon & staid all night.

 

Monday 18: Do. Sowing Wheat. Mr R Skerrett atty. Emma.

 

Tuesday 19: At Newcastle on various matters particularly relative to the Building erected by Mr Ger. [George] Wilkinson on land belonging to the Subscribers to the Theatre.

 

Wednesday 20: Fine day. Mr R Skerrett dined. Emma broke out with the Measles. In te Afternoon engaged at Talk on the Hill with many of the neighbouring farmers relative to stopping the depredation which had been lately committed by persons unlawfully sporting &c. Formed a small agricultural Society to meet the first Wednesday in December & the first Wednesday in June at Talk on the Hill, Alsager, & Lawton alternately.

 

Thursday 21: At Newcastle with Miss Stamford. Fine warm day.

 

Friday 22: At Newcastle attending a Meeting of Subscribers to the Theatre relative to Land belonging to them which Mr George Wilkinson had built upon & various other matters. Cold foggy day.

 

Saturday 23: At home. In the evening Mr Josiah Potts came.

 

Sunday 24: Do. Mr Potts left us after dinner on his return home. Mr Broad & Mr Smith junr. relative to the Assignmt. of Mortgage from Miss Crompton of the late Mr Watkiss Lands in Congleton, which they took with them.

 

Monday 25: At home. Slcock & Mr R Skerrett. Engaged at Morning writing sundry letters &c.

 

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Tuesday 26: At Trentham attending Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting for receiving Rents & hearing appeals in the old Militia. Stopped at Sr. Tho. Fletchers who went & returned with me. Fine mild day.

 

Wednesday 27: At home. fine day. Got 3 strawberries in the hedge in the garden not ripe.

 

Thursday 28: At Burslem in consequence of information recd. from Mr Wood of a riot amongst the Colliers. From thence to Newcastle & to Burslem again when it was determined to call a Meeting on Saturday to consider of the propriety of an application to the Lord Lieutenant relative to the appointmt. of some acting Magistrates.

 

Friday 29: At home.

 

Saturday 30: At Burslem attending a Meeting when it was determined to petition the Gentlemen in the. . . . . .[Light..hand] who are nominated in the Commr. of the Peace to act & I was desired to prepare such particulars & make the application.

 

December, Sunday 1: At home. fine mild day.

 

Monday 2: Do. Do. Children so much indisposed with the Measles that Alcock did not come. 

 

Tuesday 3: At home engaged in the farm &c. fine mild day.

 

Wednesday 4: Dined at the Swan Talk on the hill. Meeting of agricultural Society. The following Recipe produced by Mr Cox for making bread with the raw[?poor] corn of this wet season, & which had compleatly(sic) answered

Lay your flower(sic) in Leaven the night before it is meant to be baked. Boil the water you mix your Leaven with & let it cool before you mix in your Leaven. Then to every measure of wheat you intend to bake take half a pound of allum. Boil it til it is dissolved. Then make a hole in the flour and pour it boiling into it & mix it as you would a Leaven. Let it lie til you are going to knead your dough. Then rub your allum & leaven well amongst your flour & have ready as much water boiling as you think will make your dough which pour on your flower(sic). Be sure of the boiling. Knead it stiff and work it very well. Make your loaves not too large and through the middle of each loaf make a large hole and be sure it is quite through. Put the loaves in the Oven but take care that they do not touch one another.

[Transcribers note: Leaven is a substance added to dough to produce fermentation - a form of yeast. Good, freshly ground flour would not normally need as much yeast as is being recommended.]

 

Page 144

Thursday 5: At home. fine mild day. Engaged with Wm Beardmore for the new Road.

 

Friday 6: Do. Began alteration in the road.

 

Saturday 7: At Burslem. Glaze discovered for Porcelain Ware without the use of Lead.

 

Sunday 8: At home.

 

Monday 9: Do. fine mild day.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Do.

 

[Gap left clear]

 

Wednesday 25: Set off for Nantwich. The time from the 10 to this day spent amost entirely at home in writing adjusting various Acct. &c.

 

1800

January, Sunday 5: Returned from our anual visit to Nantwich. Found a Letter from Mr Barker whom we expected tomorrow, informing us that he will not fulfil his engagement on account of the Gout with which he was then confined. James Hill came to his place on Thursday last. Fine mild day.

 

Monday 6: At home. Alcock did not come. Engaged greatest part of the day in settling the last years Accounts &c. Passed Beardmores Accounts relative to the Highways he having served the office of Surveyor for the last year.

 

Tuesday 7: At home. Engaged in Accounts &c. Alcock & his son, Musick.

 

Wednesday 8: At home.

 

Thursday 9: Do. Received information from Mr Wood of the discovery of a Clay in Lord Staffords coal mines peculiarly fine for the manufacture of earthen & porcelain wares.

 

Friday 10: At Stone attending Navgt. Committee Meeting for the purpose of raising Salaries of the Officers employed.

 

Saturday 11: Returned from Stone to a late dinner. Mild day.

 

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Sunday 12: At home.

 

Monday 13: At Burslem. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 14: Dined at Mr Watkiss's at . . .[Whidrok]. Mr. Mrs & Miss Twemlows of the Hill & Captn. Furnival. Returned late. Alcock came in the Morning.

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Thick foggy day. Engaged in writing, accts. &c.

 

Thursday 16: Do. Mr Danl. Haywood advising relative to the Title to Dwelling house in Burslem purchased from Jno. Lovett. Mr Wm Hasseles relative to Settlement on his intended Marriage. Drew Drat. of Conveyance from John Turnock of the Lands purchased from him.

 

Friday 17: At home. Me Wood came staid all night.

 

Saturday 18: Mt Wood returned home in the Morning after much conversation relative to Mr Turners patent & the new material. Engaged with the Labourers at the alterations in the grounds.

 

Sunday 19: At home.

 

Minday 20: Do. Alcock. staid all night. Heavy Snow.

 

Tuesday 21: Do. Having this day attained the age of 41.

 

Wednesday 22: Do. Engaged in the alterations in the grounds.

 

Thursday 23: Do. Received a Letter from J Peake acquainting me that his Marriage with Miss Budgen had taken place on Tuesday last. Cold stormy day with much snow which in the Evening turned to rain.

 

Friday 24: At home. Blunt came to dinner.

 

Saturday 25: Do. Blunt left us in the Evening. Mr R Skerrett dined. In the morning walked to Alsager to see the improvements making on Wm Dales farm.

 

Sunday 26: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined. Proposal received for my purchasing Mr Bulkeley's Share in the Brewery concern. Much confidential conversation on various matters. New Clay &c. Agreed to meet Mr Wm Turner at Bents relative to this subject & his Patents.

At home. Alcock.

 

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Monday 27: At home. Alcock. engaged with the workmen in the grounds.

 

Tuesday 28:

Do. Do. Perusing Mr Roger's Lease & Papers.

 

Wednesday 29: Do. Do. Writing various Letter &c.

 

Thursday 30: Do. busy all day in the grounds.

 

Friday 31: At Burslem.

 

February, Saturday 1: At home. engaged in the grounds.

 

Sunday 2: Took Eliza in the afternoon to Newcastle with Lissy & Mary. returned with the two latter in the Eveng.

 

Monday 3: At home, busy all day in the grounds. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 4: Do. Do. Mr Martin relative to Peake.

 

Wednesday 5: Do. Do. Basford & Colebough relative to the Cottage at the Rock.

 

Thursday 6: At Newcastle dining with Mr Skerrett, Blunt, Sneyd, Gibson &c. In the Evening attended the Club & returned home. Mr Funaley. Frosty.

 

Friday 7: At home. Engaged in the Grounds. Planred the Slope at the Wood with Filbert Trees &c.

 

Saturday 8: Do. Compleated(sic) the Gravelling to the first gate, Cold frosty day. Wind E.N.E. Colclough & his mother relative to the Rock

 

Sunday 9: At home. Mr Wood. severe frost.

 

Monday 10: Do. Mr Wood left us. Mr Penlington on his afairs, Alcock.

 

Tuesday 11: Do. severs frost. Eliza & Hannah at Newcastle Assembly.

 

Wednesday 12: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 13: Do. In the "General view of the Agriculture of the County of Stafford" lately published bu Mr W. Pitt of Pondsford near Wolverhampton, this County is stated to contain 1220 square miles, or 780000 Statute Acres, of which more than 150000 acres are waste. The annual rental of Staffordshire is stated at £600,000; and its population at 250,000. Thirty six inches of rain annually fall in Staffordshire, while from 20 to 21 only fall in & about London.

 

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Friday 14: At home. Hard frost. Mr. & Mrs Wm Bent Miss Godeley Mr. & Mrs & Miss Sparrow & Lieut. Gibson dined.

 

Saturday 15: Do. Do. In the introduction to Miss More's Strictures on the modern system of female education, lately published, in the following observation, which seems to me to be pretty accurately descriptive of some modern practices "A few characters of the opposite cast seem by the rumour of their exploits to fill the world; and by their noise to multiply their numbers. It often happens that a very small party of people, by occupying the foreground, so seize the public attention, and monopolise the public talk, that they appear to be the great lady: and a few active spirits, provided their activity take the wrong turn, and support the wrong cause, sum(sic) to fill the scene; and a few disturbers of orders, who have the talent of thus exciting a false idea of their inattitudes by their mischiefs, actually gain strength and swell their numbers by their fallacious arithmetic."

I was much pleased with the following passage

"I am not sounding an alarm to female warriors or exciting female politicians; I hardly know which of the two is the most disgusting and immaterial character. Propriety is to a woman what the great Roman Critic says action is to an Orator; it is the first, the second, the third requisite. A woman may be knowing active witty and amusing; but without propriety she cannot be amiable. Propriety is the centre in which all the lines of duty and of agreeableness meet. It is to character what proportion is to figure, and grace to attitude. It does not depend on any one perfection, but it is the result of general excellence. It shows itself by a regular, orderly, and inviting course; and never starts from its sober orbit into any splendid eccentricities; for it would be ashamed of such praise as it might extort by any aberrations from its proper path. It announces all commendation but that is characteristic; and I would make it the criteria of true taste, right principle, and genuine feeling in a woman, whether she would be less touched with all the flattery of romantic and exaggerated . . . [panegyria] than with that beautiful picture of correct and elegant propriety, which Milton draws of our first mother when he delineates.

Those thousand decencies which daily flow

From all her words and actions"

 

Sunday 16: At home. Frost began to leave us. Mt Wood came to dinner. Finally determined to attain a patent for the glazing Earthen & Porcelain Wares without lead, & wrote to my friend T Peake to cause the necessary steps to be taken accordingly.

 

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Monday 17: At home. Engaged on the new road. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 18: At Newcastle. dined at Mr Wm Bents & met Mr Turner for the prupose of canversing on the subject of the new Material introduced by him & his Patent. Called at Sr Thos. Fletchers & brought with me at his request the papers relative to his Cause with Mr Tollett which he wished me to pursue.

 

Wednesday 19: At Burslem attending a Meeting for taking into consideration the best means of affording relief to the industrious poor at this Season of Scarcity, when a subscription was opened & another Meeting appointed to be held on Saturday.

 

Thursday 20: At home. much engaged with the labourers on the new road &c. Mr Fritch in the Eveng.

 

Friday 21: Do. Mr Eardley relative to his Will. Engaged in various other matters in the course of the day.

 

Saturday 22: At Burslem again attending Meeting. Forming a plan for the application of Subscriptions &c. Dined with Mr Wood. Successful experiments with the metallic glaze.

 

Sunday 23: At home. Miss Willett Miss Holland & two Mr Byerley attended the service in the morning & dined. Engaged in drawing out Resolutions of the Meeting yesterday to be printed & writing long letter to Mr Wood. Fine mild day.

 

MOnday 24: At home engaged in the morning with Mr Eardley making his will & attending the execution of it. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 25: Do. Began gravelling the new road from the Plantation, two boat loads of gravel having arrived. Much engaged in the grounds &c all day.

I never look into or hear the plays of Kotzebal spoken of without recollecting the observation of Aristotle, which I think applies to them with peculiar force, namely, That ordinary writers endeavour to raise terror & pity in their audience, not by proper sentiments and expressions, but by the dresses & decorations of the Stage. This trick upon the spectators, for it is mothing more,

 

Page 149

the Italians happily enough call the Fourberia della scena. If to this Fourberia della scena, we add a constant endeavour to overthrow the morality of the stage and under it the corrupter instead of the reformer of manners, by insidious and delusive palliations of vice, instead of shewing(sic)her in her own image and deformity we shall be enabled to form a pretty just estimate of these celebrated Plays. In my judgement some of the very worst dramatic performances that ever disgraced the heart and pen of a writer, or the taste and judgement of an Audience.

 

Wednesday 26: At home. Severe cold with snow.

Mr Sheridan in his speech on Tuesday last on the Suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, takes occasion justly, however petulantly, to observe, that Men might change sentiments which they had long professed and inculcated; and asks, why Men who once thought that French principles were favourable to Liberty might not renounce that opinion, when from the evidence of facts, they saw their evil tendency and their pernicious practice? He says he shall ever contand that our safety was owing to the good sense, to the sound morality, and the discernment of the People themselves.

Mr Sheridan here does justice to the English Character, and avows a sentiment which I have uniformly held and expressed; but on such a confession as he has now thought proper to make, with not some spark of honest indignation naturally arise at the recollection of the insult and approbium which was so studiously and undistinguishingly cast by the Friends of the French Revolution upon all those who had a sufficient portion of that good sense and discernment of which Mr Sheridan speaks to apprehand, and spirit enough to pronounce from a very early period. the consequences which have since followed from that event, without waiting for such terrible evidence of facts. as its cures, its follies, and its cruelties now so lamentably and abundantly afford?

 

Page 150

Thursday 27: At home. Much engaged in planting &c. Mr. . . . [Meleor] relative to the dispute between Adml. Child and his Tenant Mrs Colcough of the Windy Arbone Estate when an appointmt. made for them to meet here in the Morning. In the afternoon Mr Cox relative to various matters.

 

Friday 28: Do. Engaged all morning with Adml. Child who staid to dinner. Mr Jas. Robinson relative to the late Mr Saml. Robinson's affairs.

 

March, Saturday 1: At home. Finished the lower plantation leading to the farm across the meadow.

 

Sunday 2: At home. Mr Wm Bent relative to various maters. Miss S went in the afternoon to Nantwich on Horseback. Fine nild Frost.

 

Monday 3: Do. This morning began sinking a well for a pump in the back yard. Richard Chadwich & Randle Hancocks. Also finished to day gravelling the new Road. Much engaged wrote long letter to Adml. Child. Alcock did not come.

Mt Middleton in his survey of Middlesex states the total population at 3,584,600.

 

Tuesday 4: At Rode to have met Mr Edlintons at Mr Salmons in order to have endeavoured to settle the Affairs between Mt Salmon & Mr Penlington & have sealed for Sale of Mr P. Moiety of the . . .[Tallworks] but Mr S did not come. From Rode to Bortwick house to settle . . . points with the Tenants. Light snow. Out till late in the afternoon. Mr Skerrett & Miss S arrived in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 5: At home. Engaged with Mr Skerrett. Sharp Frost with cold N.E. wind. A good deal indisposed.

 

Thursday 6: Do. Mr A Skerrett. Mr Cox. Mr Funnaly. Very unwell. Severe frost

 

Friday 7: Do. Mr R Skerrett dined. Mr S returned in the Evening. Still unwell. Alcock.

 

Saturday 8 Do. 

In the Appendix to the 3d. Vol. of the Monthly Review, which contains . . .[Ang..t.ls] "Motifs des Guerres &c." The Reviewer speaking of the probablility of the French Nation being convinced of the futility and folly of war from the evidence of the Policy which governed the Monarchy observes that if this was the case the same effect might be expected from it on the other Inhabitants of Europe: He adds "but, is it possible that the mass of

 

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mankind will ever be taught this lesson of practical wisdom, which as yet they have no where begun to practice? To those who entertain the high flying notions of the absolute perfectibility of Man, who believe that his passions may one day be endorsed completely subordinate to his reason, and that worth and virtue shall at last become the sole guides of human conduct, such an hope may appear rational, but those who hold the opinion, however comfortless it seems, that man is likely ever to continue the same animal which for so many thousand years history informs as he has been - a creature compounded as well as feeling as of intellect, drawn by different motives in contrary directions, sometimes impelled to vice by passion, and sometimes led by reason to the practice of virtue - such then will from wence it as absurd to expect that war shall be made to cease, or even in a very considerable degree be rendered less frequent than it has been, by speculative proofs that it is neither necessary nor useful, as to hope that the fixed laws of nature shall yield to the benevolent wish of him who would exclude from the material as well as from the moral would all that he deems Evil."

 

It is amusing and instructive to observe the progressive return of public sentiment of those rational and generally received principles and prectical opinions expecting human Policy, which prevailed anterior to the French Revolution, and the mischief as well as folly of departing from which, that Event has so fully demonstrated.

Mercier, a french writer of the present day, though a strenuous Republican says, "We here in proscribing superstitution, destroyed all religious sentiment; but this is not the way to regenerate the World."

He declares, the grand evil of the Revolution to have been "the hasty and inconsiderate invitation of the Multitude to the discussion of political matters, which are subjects in general beyond their reach."

The Monthly Reviewer observes "We recognise with pleasure this sentiment in a Republican. A Mob may be in a few moments worked up to madness, but it cannot so soon be instructed.

Monterquim long before made the following Observation "One great fault there was in most of the ancient republics, that the People had a right to active resolutions, such as require some execution, a thing of which they are absolutely incapable.

And yet in what contempt & derision were such sober sentiments as these one time held by the friends of the French revolution; and how vehemently & insultingly were these who entertained and presumed to avow them declaimed against as Enemies to Mankind, Friends to Tyranny, Advocates for servitude and partizans(sic) of every imperfection & abase in the ancient french, or existing British Constitution!. J.C.

 

Sunday 9: At home. So unwell as to be unable to go through the Service.

 

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Monday 10: At home. Alcock. Severe cold. Wind & snow.

 

Tuesday 11: Do. Mr Jno. Garnett dined. Engaged . . . at part of the Morning in perusing & settling Mr Wm Bents Deeds relative to his purchase of Mr Jno. Hardman's Share in the Brewery Concern. James Wright relative to the well. Agreed for so much as shd. be done by day labour at 16d a week each man. Frost began to go.

 

Wednesday 12: At home. Began altering the drawing Room. Much rain.

 

Thursday 13: Do: Mr Boudarde began instructing the children in French. Eliza, Mary, Ann & Emma. Fine mild day. Mr Penlington.

 

Friday 14: Do. Severe Cold. Engaged writing, drawing &c. Began ploughing for oats in the Hollin's Ground.

 

Saturday 15: At home.

 

Sunday 16: Do. Still very unwell. Returned Sir Tho. Fletcher the papers relative to the dispute with Mr Tollett.

 

Monday 17: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 18: Do. Mr. Brandon began instructing  the Children in writing & Accounts.

 

Wednesday 19: At home. Engaged with various persons.

 

Thursday 20: Do. Messrs. Alcock Fitch Bagnall T Alcock & Mr Hollins dined. In the Evening Musick. Mrs & Miss Morris.

 

Friday 21: Do. Mr Turner of Lane End dined. Came relative to the patent lately obtained by him.

 

Saturday 22: At Burslem. In my absence Sir Tho. & W Fletcher called. Engaged in the Afternoon with various persons. Mr Penlington relative to the proposals made by Mr Salmon. Mr Galley relative to the house at Nantwich &c.&c. Fine mild day.

 

Sunday 23: At home. In the Afternoon Mr Wood & Mr Davenport relative to Mr Turners patent, with specimins of the material found in Mr Kinnersley's mones at Chesterton. Mild day with Fog & light Rain.

 

Monday 24: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 25: Engaged in superintending the . . .[sowing] &c. of the old Road &c. Mr Wiod came to dinner & returned in the Evening. Mild day.

 

Page 153.

Wednesday 26: At home. Much engaged with the workmen in the Grounds.

 

Thursday 27: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Friday 28: Do. Engaged with the workmen.

Mr Dundas in his opening of the India Budget on Wednesday last, states the quantity of Tea sold by the East India Company in 1799 at 25,000,000 pounds: from whence a Revenue had arisen of about £1,500,000.

In the year 1784 - 5 the quantity sold was 16,000,000 pounds, the duty upon which ammounted only to £324,720.

 

Saturday 29: At home. Engaged with the workmen, & this day finished filling up the Old ditch in the grounds, leading from the gate to the Turn of the Road at the bottom of the Hill. Messrs. Blunt, Brazier & Ansance dined. Mild day but showery.

 

Sunday 30: At home. Mr Wm. Bent dined -  Mr Turnock relative to his Tithe.

 

Monday 31: Do. Alcock. fine mild day.

 

April, Tuesday 1: At Newcastle on various matters. Called at Sr. Tho. Fletchers dined with Mr Wm Bent & returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 2: At home

 

Thursday 3: Do: Mr Boudarde. Much engaged about the farm liming, draining &c. Mr R Skerrett relative to his dispute with Mr Rhodes & which I finally settled.

 

Friday 4: At home.

 

Saturday 5: Do. Mr Blunt came to dinner; brought Butlers Analogy which I propose reading again with much attention. Much conversation on various matters. Showery day. Set Early potatoes in the field sowed turnips in the plantations.

 

Sunday 6: At home. In the afternoon rode out with Lissy, Ann came in the Evening. fine day with light showers.

The present scarcity often remonds me of a very sensible observation of Paley's in speaking of Tithes, namely that, in the . . . at least in which they are collected at present, they operate

 

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"as a County upon Pasturage. The . . .[Burden] of the tax falls with its chief, if not with its whole weight, upon tillage; that is to say, upon that precise mode of cultivation which, as hath been shown above it is the busines of the State to relieve and remunerate, in preference to every other"

Palys principles of moral & pol. Phil.

In the Evening rode om horseback with Lissy.

 

Monday 7: At home. Alcock. Finished ploughing for oats. Mr Sephton began . . .[pl..ting] & . . .[st..ning].

 

Tuesday 8: Do. Engaged in various matter relative to the farm.

 

Wednesday 9: Do.

 

Thursday 10: Do. Receiving Mr Penlingtons Rents. Mr H Booth relative to my undertaking as Arbitration of dispute between Messrs. Booth & Chatterley & R.Baddeley which I declined. Very wet day. Mr. Boudarde. In the evening Mrs Blunt returned with Eliza & Hannah from Newcastle.

 

Friday 11: At home. fine mild day. Ann returned to Nantwich with Stamford who rode for the first time the roan filly. Lissy & I accompanied them part of the way. Mr Blunt came in the Evening.

 

Saturday 12: At home. Mr Wood & Mr Hickman dined.

 

Sunday 13: At home

 

Monday 14: Went to Stone by Burslem attending Committee of Genl. Assembly of Props. of the Navign. Major Daniel resigned.

 

Tuesday 15: Returned from Stone. Found Mr Bent at Linley.

 

Wednesday 16: At Newcastle dining with Mr Hollins. Blunt &c. Set early Potatoes in the field.

 

Thursday 17: Do. Engaged with Mr Blunt Mr Boudarde. In the Evg. Mr Keys.

 

Fruday 18: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 19: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: Do. Alcock. Engaged in the Grounds.

 

Tuesday 22: At Burslem. various matters. Finished sowing oats.

 

Wednesday 23: At home. Finished spreading lime

 

Thursday 24: Do. Mr Boudarde. Fine day.

 

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Friday 25: At home. Set winter Potatoes

 

Saturday 26: Do. In the afternoon Mr Wm Bent. Received this morning out of Lancashire a specimin of the material which forms the chief substance of the Jasper.

 

Sundau 27: Do. Mr Wood dined.

 

Monday 28: Do. Mrs Penlington. Mr Turnock executing Conveyance of Lands purchased from him. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Mr Wilbraham & Mr Salmon called. The commencement of an Acquantance with the former from which I cannot but expect much satisfaction.

 

Wednesday 30: Do. Engaged in the Grounds & various matters.

 

May, Thursday 1: Do. Turned out 3 barren cows into Johnsons Land. One had from Barthomley as a milker last year. Fine growing weather.

 

Friday 2: At Newcastle Meeting Messr. Sharpe & . . .[lules.] Usk from Manchester perusing & executing Deeds &c relative to Mr Wm Bents purchase of Mr Hardmans Share in the Brewery. Dined at Mr Wm Bents Sparrow, Hollins, Walker, Poole & F. Fenton. Returned in th Evg. Heavy rain in the Morning

 

Saturday 3: At home.

 

Sunday 4: Do.

 

Monday 5: At Alsager Heath. Attending anunal Meeting of Trustees of Alsager Church. Remarkably fine day.

 

Tuesday 6: At home. In the morning threw some boiling water upon my Leg which confined me all day. Immediately on the accident I had recourse to cold water which I had poured upon the part for an hour, till the pain & Inflamation had surprisingly subsided. I then applied Goalard's extract & later. In the course of the day I scarsely suffered any pain though a very large blister more than the size of a Crown piece had arisen on the shin bone.

 

Wednesday 7: This morning I discharged the water out of the blister, & was scarsely sensible of any Accident having happened, except one such part where the skin had been rubbed off in undressing. The effect of the cold water appeared very

 

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manifest, from there being a small blister on the inside the . . .[Ankle], which had been much exposed to the operation of the water, but of which I had never been aware til the blister rose so completely had the application prevented pain or inflamation. Turned three milkers out into the large Linley field.

 

THursday 8: Mr Boudarde. In the evening went to Burslem to stay a day or two. Eliza & the three eldest girls walked. At night violent storm of Thunder & Lightening with rain.

 

Friday 9: At Burslem.

 

Saturday 10: Returned in the Morng. from Burslem & called upon Mr Wilbraham at Rode hall. Eliza & the chioldren returned in the Eveng. Leg well from the exercise. Finished taking down the fence at the corner of the Starcliffe.

 

Sunday 11: At home. Mr Wm Bent dined. confined with my leg.

 

Monday 12: Do. confined to the house with my leg. Engaged all morning in writing long letter to Mrs Lurcome relative to Mr Penlingtons affairs &c. Turned out four more feeders.

 

Tuesday 13: Do. Do. Alcock. Mr R Skerrett

 

Wednesday 14: Do. Do.

"A variety of Sects in the namtural consequence of religious Liberty; and mutual animosity is too often the consequence of a variety of Sects. The mischief is not that men think differently, which is unavoidable; it is, their refusing others that liberty, which they take themselves. To restrain, therefore, the bad effects of bigotry, the prudent legislatior protects an establishment; and whatever toleration he may allow to Sectaries (and the wisest hath generally allowed the most) he will however keep such a restraint upon them, as may preserve the tranquility of the whole."

Life of Zisca by Gilpin.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Do. Leg still very troublesome. Mr Boudarde. Mr Funnaley.

 

Friday 16: Do. Do. Miss Potts arrived from Birmingham.

 

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Saturday 17. At home. Leg little better. Heavy rain.

 

Sunday 18: Do. Do. Mr Wm Bent relative to his affairs with Col. Balkeley &c. previous to his going to London to settle the same.

 

Monday 19: Do. Engaged writing various Letters &c. In the evg. Alcock. Joshua bought 11 sheep & 5 lambs at Leek fair.

 

Tuesday 20: Do. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 21: Do. Miss Stamford & Miss Potts set off to Eaton.

 

Thursday 22: Do. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 23: Do:

 

Saturday 24: Do: Mr Blunt

 

Sunday 25: Do: Mr Blunt staid at night. Great improvemt. making by Stamford led us yesterday to a great deal of consideration of his future plan of education. Cambridge strongly recommended by Mr B.

 

Monday 26: Do. Mr Wm Bent on his return from London where he had Contracted for the purchase of Col. Balkeley's Share in the Brewery Concern at Newcastle. For the first time since Saturday 10th. inst. walked to the farm having been confined almost to my seat since that day by my leg.

 

Tuesday 27: Do. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 28: Do. Mr Wilbraham called & engaged me to dine with him tomorrow.

 

Thursday 29: Dined at Mr Wilbrahams . Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 30: Mr & Mrs Wood & family came to Linley to dinner & to spend a few days.

 

Saturday 31: At home engaged with Mr Wood &c.

 

JUne, Sunday 1: Do. Do.

 

Monday 2: Do. Do. Mr Thos Wedgwood dined.

 

Tuesday 3: Do. Do. Alcock. In the Eveng. the Woods returned.

 

Wednesday 4: At home. Purchased a bay & roan from Mr Lander for the gig.

 

Thursday 5: Attended Agricultural Meeting at the Red ball Lawton.

 

 

 

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Friday 6: At home. In the evening rode out with Eliza in the gig.

"We shall suffer the most eventful season ever witnessed in the affairs of men, to pass over our heads to very little purpose, if we fail to learn from it some awful lessons on the nature and progress of the passions.

Among the various passions which that Revolution (The French) has so strikingly displayed, none is more conspicuous than vanity; nor is it difficult, without adverting to the national character of the people, to account for its extraordinary predominance. Political power, the most seducing object of ambition, never before circulated through so many Lands; the prospect of possessing it was never before presented to so many minds. Multitudes, who by their birth and education, and not unfrequently by their talents, seemed destined to perpetual obscurity, wise by the alternative rise and fall of parties, . . .[describe] into distinction, and shared in the functions of Government. The short livid forms of power and office glided with such rapidity through successive ranks of degradation, from the Court to the very dregs of the populace, that they seemed rather to solicit acceptance than to be a prize contented for; yet as it was still impossible for all to possess authority though none were willing to obey, a general impatience to . . .[break] through the ranks and rush into the foremost ground, maddened and infuriated the nation, and overwhelmed law, order, and civilization with the violence of a torrent."

Halles Sermon on Infidelity p. 32

Infusing into those interested with the enaction of laws a spirit of rash innovation and daring empiricism, a disdain of the established usages of mankind, a foolish desire to dazzle the world with new and untried systems of policy, in which the precedents of antiquity and the experience of ages are only consulted to be trodden under foot; and into the executive department of Government a fierce contention for pre eminence, an incessant struggle to supplant and destroy, with a propensity to calumny and suspicion, proscription and massacre.

Ibid.

 

Saturday 7: At home

 

Sunday 8: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 9:Do.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Engaged in perusing Act of Parliament &c previous to attending Newcastle junction Canal Meeting tomorrow.

 

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Wednesday 11: At Newcastle attending Canal Meeting & afterwards dined at Mr Wm Bents. First time that I had put on a boot since my accident. Eliza & Miss Stamford & Lissy drank tea at Mrs Willetts. Returned with them in the Carriage.

 

Thursday 12: At home. Mr Boudarde. Mr Skerrett came. Mr & Mrs Wilbrahim called.

 

Friday 13: Do. Engaged with Mr Skerrett.

 

Saturday 14: Mr Skerrett returned. At Burslem. Mr & Mrs Blunt & Messrs. Brazier & . . .[Horcop] dined.

 

Sunday 15: At home. Mrs Blunt.

 

Monday 16: Mrs Blunt returned with Stamford. Went with Mr & Mrs Wilbraham to the works at Burslem & afterwards dined with them at Rodehall. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 17:At home.

 

Wednesday 18: At Newcastle dining with Mr Kinnersly, Sr. Jno Heathcote, Messrs Manwaring, Swinnerton Henshall & self.

 

Thursday 19: At home. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 20: Do.

 

Saturday 21: Do. Mr & Miss Swinnerton & Mr Blunt dined. Called on the Mr S in the  morning at Rode hall & Lawton Hall

 

Sunday 22: Do. At home

 

Monday 23: At Burslem. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 24: Went to Nantwich with Eliza in the Gig. Penlingtons affairs &c.

 

Wednesday 25: At Nantwich

 

Thursday 26: Returned home after a very pleasant excursion

 

Friday 27: Mr & Mrs Lawrence & family arrived in the evening.

 

Saturday 28: At home. engaged with Mr Lawrence

 

Sunday 29: Do. Smiths attempt to assassinate Mr Wainwright

 

Monday 30: Do. Alcock

 

July, Tuesday 1: At Burslem

 

Wednesday 2: Mr Lawrence left Linley in the morning. At Newcastle Races dined at the Ordinary at the Crown & in the Evg. at the Ball with Eliza & Hannah.

 

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July, Thursday 3: At Newcastle again. Dined at the Roebuck. Appointed Steward for the ensuing year on the nomination of Mr Egerton with Mr Wilbraham. In the Evg. at the Theatre.

 

Friday 4: at home.

 

Saturday 5: Mrs Lawrence & the Boys left us. Ann & Bessy arrived from Nantwich. Mr & Mrs Turner & Mrs & Miss Willett came to dinner.

 

Sunday 6 At home. Mr Turner performed the Service.

 

Monday 7: At Burslem with Mr Turner.

 

Tuesday 8: Mr & Mrs Turner & the Willetts left Linley. Mrs Skerrett arrived.

 

Wednesday 9: At Nantwich Races. dined at the Ordinary at the Crown.

 

Thursday 10: Do. dined at Mr Thos. Gametts. Mr Skerrett returned with me in the Evg. Mr Barber had arrived this morning. Found on my return Letter from Dr Percival with an addl. Vol. of a Fathers Instructions.

 

Friday 11: At home. Began mowing

 

Saturday 12: Do: Engaged with Haymakers &c.

 

Sunday 13: Mr & Mrs Turner came. Dined myself at Sr. Thos. Fletchers; Bent &c.

 

Monday 14: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 15: Do. Mr Yoxall & Mr Adams dined

 

Wednesday 16: Do. 

 

Thursday 17: Do. Mr Wood dined. In the afternoon Mr Barber left Linley. Sold a feeding Cow £14

 

Friday 18: Do. Fishing at the Bath Pool. finished mowing

 

Saturday 19: At Newcastle pursuant to appointment with Mr Jos. Adams on his affairs with Mr T Sparrow relative to the New Arrangements of the Salt affairs. Returned to dinner & brought Miss Stamford in the gig. Appointed with Mr T Sparrow to attend a Commr. in Palins & Birks's Banktcy, and in a Reference . . . to one the first mark after the assizes.

 

Sunday 20: At home. read Sickers excellent sermon from the Text 'Man saith the Lord of Hosts Consider your . . .' A composition which I consider as a Masterpiece of Pulpit eloquence.

 

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Monday 21: At Burslem with Mr Skerrett in the Gig. finished Hay harvest except  . . . all. . . pieces about the corn &c. Mr Burgiss paying off his late Mothers Mortge.

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Messrs. Wm. Thos & Jno Garnett dined. Alcock, his son & Bagnall. Musick.

 

Wednesday 23: At Rode Heath with Mr Skerrett on Mr Penlingtons affairs & the proposed Reference of Mr Salmon's Account to Dr. Tho. Broughton & Mr S. Blunt came to dinner. Mr Skerrett left us in the Evening.

 

Thursday 24: At home. In the Afternoon at the Bath Pool fishing. Took one brace of Carp. Mrs Skerrett left us in the Evening.

 

Friday 25: At home.

"It has been estimated by political arithmeticians that the daily employment of the working hands in every state during the space of four hours, is adequate to the full supply, for all its Members of food, raiment, and habitation."

Percivals Fathers Instructions part 3.

 

Friday 25: At home.

" The judicious maxim, mullins jurare in ouba magistic is construed to imply a bold opposition to every established opinion. And as these may be what Lord Bacon happily turns "a superstitious fear of superstition" then may also subsist a prejudice so strong against supposed prejudice, as to be come with literary men, especially of a metaphysical turn, one great source of Scepticism and infidelity.

Instead of the evidence of Christianity being weakened by the numerous histories of Miracles which are boasted by the votaries of every religion, they are in fact confined by them. For amongst all those histories not one can be produced which does not differ from the narrative of the gospels, in circumstances of the most decisive importance, in the nature of the evidence by which it is supported, or of the facts it relates."

Elringtons Sermons

In confirmation of the above judicious and important observation, it may be remarked, that in respect tp the miracles alleged to have been performed by Vespasian in obedience to a vision of the God Serapis, the partizans(sic) who supported his

 

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pretensions availed themselves of such artifices as were suited to the superstitions of the age. It is, indeed, evident that Vespasian himself was engaged in the plot of Imposition. For when he visited the temple of Serapis, to consult that God concerning the fate of the empire. he commanded all to retire, that he might without fear of contradiction pretend to have seen the vision of Basilides, then confined by sickness at a considerable distance from Alexandria, whose name and presence were to be alleged as the assurance of divine favour.

Instead of any direct testimony of Eye witnesses of the facts performed by Christ Jacitus, on whose authority so much reliance has been placed only assures us that in his time the events contained to be recounted and averred by those who had been Eye witnesses , and could reap no advantage from their flattery. Thus . . . the strength of the Evidence at least one & in the most important . . . But the narrative of Jacitus affords no reason even to conjecture that he himself gave credit to these miracles. The accounts delivered too appear to have varied so essentially, and in such striking particulars, that it was impossible that they should have proceeded from Eye witnesses. Sactonius represents that the limb restored was the leg, and Jacitus the arm. The former speaks of the person who was seen by Vespasian in the Temple as a poor man; the latter as a grandee of Egypt.

It should also be observed, that the Physicians who were ordered by Vespasian to examine whether the lameness and blindness were curable by human aid, reported, that in the one the power of sight was not wholly extinct, but would return were the obstacles removed; and, in the other, the joints were only disturbed & might be restored with regular . . . Vid

Note to Ant. Un. HIst. Vol 15. p. 22.

"In the small collection of only nine cures (performed at the tomb of Abbe Paris) there is not one that possesses the characteristics which prove the interference of divine

 

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power; not one in which a disorder clearly beyond the influence of the imagination was instantaneously and perfectly removed: Nay more not one of any kind in health and strength were completely and at once restored.

Where ignorance and superstition have prevailed, where interest excites to deceit, and power protects it from detection, where few are willing to doubt, and where none can with safety enquire, instances may occur in which the artifices of men, who took advantages of these circumstances have imposed upon the Multitude. But how is Christianity affected by this? If an instance were produced in which miracles were successfully pretended to arrange such a people as I have described, by persons adverse to their superstitions we then might admit the objection to have weight." Elrington at sup.

 

Saturday 26: At home. In the afternoon fishing again at the Bath Pool with Mr Kinnersly. I took 22 brace of fine carp of which I had six which turned into the water at the farm.

 

Sunday 27: Do. very hot

 

Monday 28: Do. In the morning fine shower of Rain

 

Tuesday 29: Do.

 

Wednesday 30: Hannah & Ann with two of the Children set off for Burlington. Still very hot. Alcock

 

Thursday 31: At home. In the afternoon fishing again at the Bath Pool when we took 25 brace of carp of which I had 8 brace & ½ which I turned into the water at . . .[Terhaas]. Mr & Mrs K & 2 of the young ladies drank tea at Linley.

 

August, Friday 1: Sold a cow to Philip Wood for £11:15 cost £5:8. In the afternoon at Newcastle with Eliza, Lissy & Bess. Drank tea at Mrs Blunts & afterwards went to the Play. Went myself through the Brewery with Mr W Bent with whom I had much conversation & who mentioned to me the . . .[following] substitute for Barm [froth on fermenting malt liquor] substitute.1lb of starch. 1 lb of brown sugar & 2 quarts of small beer Gently boiled together. afterwards add 1 quart of Barm.

 

Page 164

Saturday 2: At Burslem, Mr Wood being at Buxton. Return this week £700. In the Evg. engaged in drawing up Rules & Regultn. for the Agricultural Society proposed to be instituted at Newcastle under the direction of Capn. Sneyd & myself & the first meeting of which is to be held on Wednesday next.

 

Sunday 3: At home. Mr Wm Bent came to dinner. In the afternoon Miss Willett & Mr Jos. Byerley.

 

Monday 4: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Began this day the works in old Linley Lane for supplying the house with water: the well which I had begun in the yard not promising a sufficient supply at any commodious depth.

 

Wednesday 6: At Newcastle. breakfasted at Mr Bents. Afterwards attending first meeting of the Agricultural Society. In the Chair Capt. Sneyd prevented from attending by intelligence which had been received of the death of his Brother Harry in Ireland. Respectable meeting. Resolutions &c unanimously adopted. Served with a Spa. [subpoena] to attend as a witness in the case of Heath v Halland by the latter.

 

Thursday 7: At home: Engaged with the workmen. Mr Boudarde in the evg. Mr Keys. very hot day.

 

Friday 8: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Mr Wood came but did not stay to dinner.

 

Sunday 10: Hassall & Mr Massey arrived soon after Breakfast. Much conversation with the former on various matters. Rochdale Canal Shares sell for £67

 

Monday 11: At home. Alcock. In the Evening rode out in the Gig with Eliza. Turned 12 Trout which the men had taken out of the brook at Alsager into the large pool. Hassall & Mr Massey went in the morning early.

 

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Tuesday 12: At home. Engaged all morning with Mr Holland Attorney relative to my attending at Stafford as a witness in the case of Heath agt. Holland when he thought my attendance might be dispensed with. In the afternoon served with a Spa. to attend as a witness in a Case Sr. Tho. Fletcher agt. Jackson & to provide Deeds. In the Evening took Eliza in the Gig to Newcastle. Attended Mr Heath Atty & delivered to him the Deed which he wished me to produce at the Assizes, & got excused attending.

 

Wednesday 13: At home. Engaged with the workmen. In the Eveng. rode out with Bessy in the Gig.

 

Thursday 14: Do. Do. very hot.

 

Friday 15: Do. "The average number of Ships employed in the Trade from Newcastle to London is 400, never less than 300, or more than 500. They make from nine to ten voyages in the year.

The price of a London Chaldron [A measure of coal - 36 bushels] of the best coals at Newcastle including the keel dues, lights, town dues, beer money and insurance at Newcastle was during the present year £13/7/4 alongside the Ship before put on board. The expense of loading included in the freight.

On the coals arriving at London, the Custom house expenses, . . .[Mutage] and Orphans duty, Kings duty, additional 5p. cart duty, discount & . . .[scorage] allowed the buyer. factors commission, petty expenses and interest on duties advanced, will amount to 11/6 per load on Chaldron.

The average number of Men and boys in each ship is in the proportion of one to twenty one tons. The wages of seamen in the coal trade is higher than in any other service, on account of the difficulty of the Navigation,  and its being confined to those bred up in the trade.

Wages which used before the war to be from £2: 10 in Summer & £3:3 in winter are now at the enormous rate of £11:11 for a single voyage. A London Chaldron of the best coals, so as to give a fair mercantile profit to all parties concerned, could not at this time (April 1) be sold in the London market for less than 48 per London Chaldron. In time of peace at not less than 37 during summer, and 3g during winter."

Gillespy's Evidence before the Committee of the House of Commons for examining into the coal trade.

Mr Gillespy is a Coal factor, Ship owner &c.

 

This afternoon the men laid the first retaining Stone on the Wheel race.

 

Page 166

Saturday 16: In the morning took Eliza in the Gig to Burslem. On our return the mare refusing to take the collar on beginning to ascend the Hill up to Talk, she ran back with the Carriage down a very considerable precipice. In attempting to jump out & seize her head, I was myself thrown down; and Eliza though taken down the precipice & the mare had compleatly(sic) turned over so that she lay with her head to the gig with the Shaft broke, most wonderfully escaped unhurt. To her own carlness(sic) [calmness] & presence of mind this must be in great measure attributed. On looking at the place in the Evening, I found that had the carriage gone down even a very few yards further, or short of the place where the accident happened there scarcely seemed a possibility that both of us might have been dashed to pieces. Fortunately a few bushes overhung at this spot, which by impeding the descent of the Carriage took the violence of the fall & gave Eliza time to disengage herself. In the evening Mr & Mrs T. Peake arrived.

 

Sunday 17: At home. Mr Wm Bent breakfasted & brought us the intelligence of the death of Mr John Willett, which happened about eleven o'clock the night before. Returned the Gig Mare to Mr Lander.

 

Monday 18: At home. Began cutting oats. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 19: Do. In the afternoon laid the first stone of the well or Reservoir in old Linley Lane for supplying the house with water.

 

Wednesday 20: At Newcastle attending the funeral of John Willett. Thunder & Lightening about noon with rain. Attended Turnpike Meeting at the Roebuck & returned home to dinner. Mr Wood Mr Hudson of London & Mr J. Wedgwood dined

 

Thursday 21: At home.

 

Friday 22: At Burslem with Mr & Mrs T Peake. Returned to dinner.

 

Page 167

Saturday 23: At Newcastle breakfasting with Mr Wm Bent from thence to Bullerton & returned home to dinner. In the evening very unwell.

 

 

Sunday 24: At home. Still very unwell.

 

Monday 25: Do. Mr Skerrett. Do. Alcock. Early in the morning a more serious attack of my old nervous complaint.

 

Tuesday 26: Do. Mr Harding & Mr Beckett relative to the Houses on the Marsh, Acct &c. Memdn. They appointed to come to Linley on Tuesday the 7th Oct & dine for the purpose of closing the Account. In the Afternoon Mr R Skerrett & Mr Wm Bent.

 

Wednesday 27: Do. Still unwell.

 

Thursday 28: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr & Mrs Peake & Eliza & Bessy at Newcastle but returned to dinner.

 

Friday 29: Do. In a conversation with Peake on the subject of Hadfield's Trial for the attempt to assassinate the King, he mentioned to me, on the authority of Serjt. Best one of the counsel for the prisoner from who he had it, that the prisoners Brief were delivered and the fees paid by Government. To what reflections does not such a circumstance as this lead, on the purity & excellence of the administration of Justice in this country? and the candour and mildness of its Government. Busy carrying oats.

 

Saturday 30: Mr Caskine said he could not stand the glance by Mr Pitt's eye in the House of Commons. At home.

 

Sunday 31: Do.

 

September, Monday 1: Do: Alcock did not come. The person who tithed for Mr Tollett said that on an average through his district the wheat yielded this year 15 Thrave per acre, A Thrave is generally estimated at a Bushel & a half. The medium crop of wheat in Staffordshire was estimated by the person who attended to give information in consequence of the application made by Governmt. in the year 1795, at 18 or 20 bushels (Staffordshire measure of 38 quarts to the bushel) per acre. The average reported to Government was only 18 bushels per acre. Finished carrying oats. In the Eveng. Eliza Mrs Peake Bessy & Lissy went to the play at Newcastle.

 

Page 168

Tuesday 2: At home. Began cutting wheat.

 

Wednesday 3: Do. Mr Wood. In the evening very heavy rain.

 

Thursday 4: Do. Mr Boudarde. Hannah &c. arrived from their Journey into the North. In the evening Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 5: Ann & Bessy with Mr & Mrs Peake set off to Nantwich. The latter on their Journey into North Wales. Wet evening.

 

Saturday 6: At home. In the afternoon Mr Wm Bent.

 

Sunday 7: Do. 

 

Monday 8: At Burslem. Alcock. In the afternoon very heavy rain.

 

Tuesday 9: At home. Rain with thunder.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Sold two cows to Mr Twemlow for £26. In the afternoon cut wheat.

 

Thursday 11: Do. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 12: At Newcastle.

 

Saturday 13: At home. Blunt came to dinner.

 

Sunday 14: At home. Mr Jackson of Nantwich came to dinner.

 

Monday 15: Mr Jackson left Linley. At Newcastle Fair. Undertook reference between Mr Swinnerton, Barlow & others relative to Delph house. Acct. Colliery &c. Appointed Meeting of Committee of Agricultural Society for Wednesday 23rd inst at the Roebuck. Returned home to dinner. In the Evng. Mr & Mrs Peake arrived.

 

Tuesday 16: At home. carrying wheat. Began strawberry digging in the Garden at the farm.

 

Wednesday 17: Do. Finished carrying wheat.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr Wood relative to the proceedings of the Potters respecting the proposals made by the Weaver Company for carrying by that River. In the afternoon acted as Chairman of a Meeting held at Hanley.

 

friday 19: At home.

 

Saturday 20: At Burslem. Mrs Peake, Eliza &c went to Trentham.

 

Sunday 21: Do. In the afternoon Miss Willett.

 

Page 169

Monday 22: At home. wet stormy day. Riot commenced in the pottery on acct. of high price of Corn.

 

Tuesday 23: At home. Alcock. In the afternoon the Rioters came to Lawton & from thence to Rode Hill but committed no great violence.

 

Wednesday 24: At Newcastle to have attended Agricultural Committee Meeting but owing to the Riots in the Neighbourhood which engaged many of the Committee who were of the Cavalry the same was adjourned to Friday the 3rd Oct.

Went from Newcastle to Longport where the Rioters were expected to be & from thence to Burslem & afterwards accompanied by Capn. Sneyd & Mr Sparrow to Hanley when the Rioters were assembled in so great force that the Cavalry & the troops of 17 Light Dragoons has been called out. Staid at Hanley til about six o'clock & in the meantime had gone amongst the Mob & prevailed upon some to go quietly home.

 

Thursday 25: At Newcastle attending the funeral of Mrs Gaston. Mr Sneyd of Belmont had arrived on acct. of the Riots & went with the Cavalry & Lewarth Volunteers into the Pottery. Dined at the Roebuck with Rev. W. . . . &c

 

Friday 26: At home. In the evening engaged with Mr Edwd. Eardley relative to the reference made to me of dissents respecting the Delph house Colliery by Mr Swinnerton. Mr & Mrs Barlow & others. Received notice from Mrs Johnson to quit at Lady day next.

 

Page 170

[Transcribers note: The entries below refer to an absence of 3 weeks but there are no entries between Sept 25th and Oct 29th. JC clearly very unwell during this period.]

Wednesday 29: Returned from Buxton after an absence of 3 weeks. Better but far from well. Found Mr Wood relative to taking a Lease of the Grange Estate which we determined to do.

 

Thursday 30: At home. Mr Fritch

 

Friday 31: Do. In the morning coursed for an hour with Mr Chas. Lawton.

 

Saturday 1: At Newcastle in Palins Banktcy. &c.

 

Sunday 2: At home. In the morning Mr Wm Bent.

 

Monday 3: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 4: Do.

 

Wednesday 5: Do.

"The immediate cause of Springs consists in the condensation of the atmospheric moisture, during the night principally: by the greater coldness of the Summits of hills. The water thus condensed in the Summits of hills descends between the strata of the incumbent soil, sometimes for many miles together; but generally from the nearest eminences into the adjoining vallies."

Darwins Phytologia p. 259

The best method of preventing the vallies from being too moist must be by cutting a long horizontal ditch into the side of the mountain to intercept the water just before the level land of the Valley commences: and thus to carry it away.       Ibid p. 261

For the various modes of accomplishing this vid. the same Book.

 

November. Friday 22: From the time of making the last Entry I have been almost wholly employed at home in superintending the workmen at the wheel &c for supplying the House with water. On the 19th inst. it was brought opposite to the front of the House & this day to the Gates of the Stable

 

Page 171

Yard. I went in the morning to Newcastle (with Eliza & Hannah) on various matters of business, & dined at Mrs Willetts. Mr McNivin of Lancashire, who I met with at Mr Wm Bents, & who is a Constructor with Government for the supply of the Barracks at Manchester, informed me that the allowance for the Dragoon horses is 12lbs weight per day of hay & 7 lbs of oats.

Gives his cows a little Hay, or good oatstraw chopped, then after Turnips, & sups[?tops] up with grains about a peck. This attention (if the word may be used) more advantageous than any one species of food.

 

Saturday 22(sic): Mr Blunt & Mr Vale came to dinner. In the morning finished . . .[had doing] Potatoes. Lissy  returned from Nantwich. Water carried on to the corner of the stable, by which means the house will from henceforth be supplied by the wheel.

 

Sunday 23: Ay home. Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 24: Do. Rain & snow. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 25: Much snow.

 

Wednesday 26: At Newcastle attending Meeting of the Commrs. of the Talk & Lewarth Turnpike Road when order made for completing the new branch. Subscribed £50. Dined at Mr Bents. violent storm of snow at night.

 

Thursday 27: At home. Mr Boudarde. Mr Fritch.

[Bottom of page left blank]

 

Page 172

December, Monday 1: At home. began draining the bank before the house. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 2: At home.

 

Wednesday 3: Planted the Trees from the Yew Tree along the bottom of the Ground to the new foot road. Dined at Millsay at Talk in the hill the agriculture meeting.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Mr Adams relative to his business with Mr Sparrow & dined.

 

Friday 5: Began the Reservoir for the water at the top of the Back Yard.

 

Saturday 6: At Newcastle

 

Sunday 7: At home.

 

Monday 8: Do.

 

Tuesday 9: Do.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Mr Maris of Baltimore & Mr Wood. Alcock

 

Thursday 11: Do. engaged with Do. Mr Fritch

 

Friday 12: Mr Maris & Mr Wood left us. At Newcastle attending a meeting relative to the boarding school buildings.

 

Saturday 13: At home. Mr Wilbrahim called.

 

Sunday 14: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 15: At home. Engaged with the workmen

 

Tuesday 16: Do. Do. Began altering the waste weir at the wheel

 

Wednesday 17: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr R Skerrett

 

Friday 19: Do.

 

Saturday 20: At Newcastle on various matters. Finished the waste weir. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 21: Do.

 

Monday 22: At Burslem. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At home. In the house all day.

 

Wednesday 24: Do. Finished claying the Reservoir & began laying the stone at the bottom.

 

Page 173

[blank page]

 

Page 174

1801

January, Friday 9: Returned from Nantwich, after an absence of a fortnight spent with much festivity and enjoyment amongst our kind affectionate friends. Frances & Louisa left behind, & having been retained one day extraordinary ourselves owing to my having a severe cold.

 

Saturday 10: At home. Engaged amongst the workmen &c. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Sunday 11: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 12: Do. Mrs Penlington. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: At home.

 

Wednesday 14: Do. Mr Swinnerton of Ballerton relative to Ld. Kenyon & Mr Tomkinson &c. Delivered to Mr Swinnerton the various papers & Letters relative to his business. Began draining the old pit in the middle of the field before the house.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mr Boudarde. Engaged with the workmen.

 

Friday 16: Do. The water was this day brought into the Reservoir.

 

Saturday 17: Do. The Reservoir was this day finished; & began filling with water for use.

"It has already been hinted, but it is an observation so pregnant with salutary inference, that it may well bear a repetition under a different aspect, that few, if any, of the forms of Government which have had any permanency, and which could boast of the advantages of civil liberty, have ever, sprung from a set of theoretical rules or maxims, digested methodically by a single, or perhaps by a numerous body of the dogmatical legislators; but that they have in general assign from a long series of experiments, and practical observations, and acquired their consistency from the occasional  remedies applied to exigencies as they occurred in the course of progressive events. Thus have none of the politics of . . . by Solon, Lycurgus, the adventurous Cromwell, and the no less presumptuous regicides of our days, had any duration, or scarcely survived their original founders; nor have the admired systems of Plato, More, Harrington, and many other of the speculative theorists, who have laboured in this field of investigation (and some of them confessedly with much sagacity and wisdom) been ever reduced into useful practice. When on the other hand we contemplate the Roman Republic, and the British empire, and the gradual perfection each required through a series of years

 

Page 175

according as experience pointed out the remedies to be applied to defects, against which all abstract wisdom could not originally provide, we shall be equally struck with the contrast, and be compelled to acknowledge that a good political constitution, necessarily comprizing(sic) a multitude of remote and intricate combinations, is not the work of a day, or of one man, or set of men.

The Helvetic Confederacy is another instance of the progressive and at the same time, unpremeditated tendency towards perfection. The Swiss cannot boast of any Legislation. Resolutely bent on preserving the independence for which they had incessantly struggled from the very beginning of their existence, justice was the corner stone on which they erected their political fabric. Without any refined maxims, or complicated set of rules, they followed the bent of their honest hearts; and by the gradual improvements of more than three centuries, at length completed a constitution, which while it afforded much matter censure to acute theorists, was productive of the happiest consequences, in securing the lives and prosperities of individuals, and the honour and prosperity of the nation at large."

Planta's History of the Helvetic Confederacy.

Quarto Vol 2d. p. 246

An intelligent and well informed writer (vid. Dict. de la Suisse) says "Thus the union of the Helvetic States depends far more upon the rude combination of the internal parts, and the nature and fortunate situation of their country, than upon nice estimates of their proportionate equilibrium or an elaborate system of political theorems."

Ibid. p. 248

 

No event in history will perhaps ever afford so much matter for speculation to moral, as well as political theorists, as the tremendous revolution, which has of late been spreading horror and devastation over the fairest part of Europe. The investigation of its origin and progress, whenever it can be entered into with the ample stock of materials, in which we shall yet a while be deficient, will be attended with the greater difficulty, as no former conflict of a similar nature had ever probably called forth so many energies and virtues, or let loose such a variety of vices and destructive passions, as the conclusion we are doomed to witness. While a few attentive observers have laboured with abundance of ingenuity, to trace the whole cause of the evil up to the pernicious efforts of a few miscreants, endowed with great genius, courage and perseverance, but with ambivalence which could only be gratified by the miseries insufferable from anarchy and sedition; others have

 

Page 176

derived the calamity from the great change introduced within this century into the state of society, by the rapid influx of wealth from both the Indies, which falling chiefly to the lot of the industrious, raised the lower classes nearer to a level with the superior orders; and by the improved cultivation of the mind, which insensibly produced a spirit of enquiry, and a presumptuous arrogance, that gradually led men to overrate the powers of reason, and unfitted them for the subordination, without which no government can possibly subsist. Many also have not scruples to decide that a thorough change in the polity[civil government] of Europe had become unavoidable through the many glaring defects in most of the existing governments rendered still more insupportable by the incapacity and maladministration of those to whom the direction of affairs had been committed.

[Transcribers note: It is not clear how the following two lines go together since there are no visible omission marks. They are written very close together and I have transcribed them as laid out.]

                     noting the puerile ambition & love of innovation of the Emperor, the irreligion of 

Frederic, the wanton diluter of all principle in Catherine, & the . . . injustice of the . . .[predition] of

 

After a relaxation had probably taken place in Poland & observing that from these circumstances the ties of reverance & loyalty which ought at all times to bind the people by their sovereign, and a political indifference which gave free scope to the disorganizers(sic) of our days, who were too keen and industrious not to avail themselves of the encouragement so profusely held out to them he proceeds.

In France the means of resistance were still more feeble than in other parts of the Continent, and here, accordingly, the seeds of sedition first broke out into open insurrection. that country had patiently supported two long reigns of depravity and enormous profusion, which had so . . . its finances that the benevolent Monarch who succeeded, unwillingly to recur to the despotic means used by his two predecessors, loosened the reigns of his government by demanding voluntary supplies, which his people would still have cheerfully granted, had not various concomitant circumstances damped their loyalty, and alienated the ardent zeal for the glory of their monarchs, for which that nation had so long been eminently distinguished. Those to whom the administration of public affairs had been consigned were, for the most part, men dissolute of the skill and vigour which the dangers of the times imperiously demanded. The glaring instances of depravity, moreover, not only winked at by the government, but even countenanced by the examples of those of higher ranks, and in the conspicuous situations, had long since offended and alarmed even the well disposed part of the nation, and greatly favoured the spirit of insubordination which gradually burst forth in all quarters. To this spirit the improvident . . .[Virgennes] gave additional vigour by his most impolitic American War, which while it countenanced an open resistance to the established authorities, greatly increased the spreading evil by additional derangement of the finances.

 

Page 177

All this, too, happened at a time when the popularity of the Sovereign was greatly impaired by his frequent dissensions with his parliament whom the people had accustomed themselves to look upon as their steady advocates, and whom repeated successes had taught to aim at further triumphs. Designing men were not wanting, who eagerly embraced the opportunity of accelerating the disturbances which they saw were now impending, and from which they had no doubt of drawing essential advantages. Aware that in order to arrive at their ends they must subvert the present system of society, they resolved to rouse the lower classes by the fascinating cry of Liberty and Equality, which they well knew no labourer, no journeyman, no vagrant of idle propensities and vicious habits would be disposed to suppress, and by a specious tender of a representation in the government, which men even of superior rank will be inclined to favour, deeming it much more eligible to have an ostensible share in the administration of public affairs, than to adhere to the peaceful enjoyment of domestic comforts and the improvement of their private fortunes by the honest arts of industry and economy.

Ibid. pp. 370 et seq.

 

Sunday 18: At home. Service &c. as usual

Men desire to have some share in the management of public affairs, chiefly on account of the importance which it gives them.

Smiths Wealth of Natures

Quarto. 2 Vol. p. 232.

 

Monday 19: At home. Alcock. In the evening Mr Fritch who came to spend a few days.

 

Tuesday 20: At home. engaged with Mr Fritch & his friend Lieut. Cope who came in the morning & staid to dinner.

 

Wednesday 21: I this day entered the 43rd. year of my age. Messrs. Hollin's, Alcock Cope Fritch of Bugnall dined, & in the evening we had some Musick.

 

Thursday 22: The weather being very stormy Mr Hollins with Alcock & Fritch staid to dinner but left us in the afternoon.

 

Friday 23: Early this morning a Messenger arrived from Nantwich with an account of the illness of our two dear little Girls Louisa & Frances in consequence of which Eliza Hannah & I immediately set off, and on our arrival found them in so alarming a state, as to induce me to send for Mr Bent. Their complaint a putrid sore throat with fever.

 

Page 178

Saturday 24: Mr Bent arrived early at Nantwich and found our dear little girls in an alarming & doubtful state. In the afternoon Hannah & I returned to Linley on account of the other Children, to whom Mr Bent had recommended the use of Bark, by way of precaution.

 

Sunday 25: At home.

 

Monday 26: Went again to Nantwich found our dear Louisa much better but my sweet Fanny extremely ill.

 

Tuesday 27: returned home.                    

                                                                

Wednesday 28: At home.

 

Thursday 29: Went again to Nantwich

[Transcribers note. The entries for 26th - 28th are bracketed together with the following entry across all three entries]

Miserable alternation of hope & fear for the state of my sweet Fanny: but my Louisa safe.

 

Friday 30: Mr Bent came again to Nantwich & gave us good hopes of the recovery of our darling little girl.

 

Saturday 31: Returned home from Nantwich

 

February. Sunday 1: At home. Mr Bent dined. In the afternoon recd. a favourable account from Nantwich. In the evening attacked with sore throat & fever.

 

Monday 2: The greatest part of the day in bed having passed a miserable night. Miss Stamford went to Nantwich.

 

Tuesday 3: Do. but in the afternoon something better. Eliza & Bessy came with Miss Stamford, but returned in the Evening. Better . . .  . . . of my dear little girl. Received a Letter from Mr Fenton informing me of my having been unanimously approved at an Assembly of the Corporation of Newcastle for their Recorder in the room of Mr Tollett & requesting me to take upon myself the Office. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 4: Mr Bent came in the forenoon & staid to dinner. Sent a Letter by him to Mr Fenton intimating my willingness to take the Office of Recorder. Account from Nantwich of the advance though slow of my beloved Fanny. Sore throat better.

 

Thursday 5: Better. Walked out in the middle of the day. Good Account from Nantwich. Mr Rubotham & Mr Lander relative to the reference which had been made to me of the matter of Rubotham agt. Rogers for breach of promise of Marriage. In the evening Mr Fritch.

 

Page 179

Friday 6: At home. Mr R Skerrett dined. Not out of Doors - good Account by Wm Dale from Nantwich.

 

Saturday 7: At home. Better.

 

Sunday 8: In the morning read the Service as usual, and after dinner went to Nantwich, where I had the unspeakable delight to find my more than ever beloved & darling girl still better in as promising a way as we could reasonably wish or expect.

 

Monday 9: Our dear little girl so much better this morning that Eliza (who was very desirous to see the Children at home) & I returned to Linley after a peculiarly tender parting with our dear Frances. Never will be erased from my Remembrance the sweet & pretty manner in which she repeatedly raised herself up to kiss me. Ann engaged to write in the succeeding day a particular account.

 

Tuesday 10: At Newcastle attending general Meeting of the Agricultural Society. Dined at the Roebuck & slept at Mr Bents.

 

Wednesday 11: Returned home, and received in the evening from Ann the heart gratifying intelligence that our dear Fanny was recovering so fast as could possibly be expected or desired, and for the first time since her seizure indulged myself in the fond & certain assurance of her perfect safety.

 

Thursday 12: At home but not very well.

 

Friday 13: About eleven o'clock this morning a Messenger arrived from Nantwich with a letter from Ann informing us that a change for the worse had taken place in our darling child, on which we immediately set off, after despatching a Messenger to Bassford with the account & symptoms.

 

Saturday 14: Between five & six o'clock this morning terminated all our hopes & all our fears: and I felt for the first time what it is to lose a child.

 

Page 180

Sunday 1:

[no entry]

 

Sunday 15:

[no entry]

 

Page 181

March, Sunday 1: Mr Bent breakfasted. The slough separated from my leg but still unable to go out of Doors.

 

Monday 2: Still confined with my leg. Alcock. staid all night.

 

Tuesday 3: Went out for the first time.

 

Wednesday 4: Went out again, but my leg rather worse. Mr Wilbrahim. Mr Jno. Garnett dined. Informed me that he had given 8½ pr. lb for Cheese the Dairy through. Edwards's of Alsager.

 

Thursday 5: Mr Boudarde. Fine day. Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 6: Confined all day. In the afternoon Mrs Skerrett with Ann & Bessy arrived. Rainy & cold.

 

Saturday 7: Still confined with my leg. Mr Skerrett arrived. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 8: Do. 

 

Monday 9: Alcock. Engaged all day with our friends.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Do. Mr Skerrett went to Nantwich.

 

Wednesday 11: Engaged with our friends. &c.

 

Thursday 12: Mr Boudarde. Mr Skerrett returned

 

Friday 13: Engaged with our friends

 

Saturday 14: Great snow. Engaged with Brookes the Carpenter relative to the additions proposed to be made to the House.

 

Sunday 15: Snow. Mr Wood dined.

 

Monday 16: The weather so bad that our friends prevented from returning today as they had intended. At Newcastle in consequence of the illness of Mrs Bent who had been entirely given up by Mr Bent & Dr. Campbell, but I found her today out of danger in consequence of having the night before parted with a Gallstone which was measured by Mr W. Bent in the presence of myself & his Brother & the dimensions of which were 4¼ inches in circumference one way & 3½ inches the other. An astonishing fact which I therefore mention thus particularly.

 

Page 182

Tuesday 17: At home. Our friends left us this morning but the day proved very wet & bad.

 

Wednesday 18: Do.

 

Thursday 19: Mr Johnson of Daisy Bank & Mr T Sparrow dined by appointment for the purpose of a conversation on the subject of the Customs of the Manor of Audley, & the new claims set up by Sr. Tho. Fletcher, the Lord. Blunt came with Mr S. Mr Johnson staid all night.

 

Friday 20: Mr Johnson left us though the morning very wet & stormy, having first looked over a good deal of the Farm & particularly the draining in various parts.

 

Saturday 21: Dined at Newcastle at Mr W Bents with Miss Hollins Blunt & Joseph Adams relative to Newcastle races &c. & appointed to accompany Mr B. to Manchester on Wednesday next on a visit to Mr Jno. Hardman & for the completion of the Brewery Title &c.

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 24: At Newcastle with Eliza & Miss Stamford. Settled finally Hollins &c. Arbitration with Mr Hassells. Brewery. From Newcastle to Etruria & Burslem. dined at Mr Woods. In the evening Bent arrived.

 

Wednesday 25: Set off for Manchester, & got to Somerville to dinner. Mr Hardman &c met us.

 

Thursday 26: Dined at Mr Wm Hardmans with a party of friends. Engaged all morning in taking a survey of the Salford Brewery & afterwards in viewing the fine Pictures of Mr Tho. Burns & Mr Wm Hardman. Called at the two Atkinsons.

 

Friday 27: Went to Manchester again. Called at Miss Hardmans in Moseley Street & Dr. Percivals. Returned to Somerville to dinner. Mr Sharpe the Atty arrived. A sensible & candid young man.

 

Saturday 28: Returned home & arrived in the Evening after a very agreeable & useful excursion having settled the Brewery business to our perfect satisfaction.

 

Page 183

Sunday 29: At home.

 

Monday 30: Do. Engaged all day on the farm. Set early potatoes on the slope behind the house & busy sowing Oats. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 31: At home. Engaged on the farm. Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood called.

 

April, Wednesday 1: At home. Do.

 

Thursday 2: Do. Mr Boudarde

 

Friday 3: Do. Miss Wedgwood & Miss Willett dined.

 

Saturday 4: Do.

 

Sunday 5: Do.

 

Monday 6: At Newcastle fair. dined at Mr Adams's with Capn. Sneyd. relative to Newcastle Races &c. Bought 4 pigs cost 3:12. [No units given]

 

Tuesday 7: At home. Set early potatoes before the house. Hannah & Lissy set off for Manchester.

 

Wednesday 8: Do.

 

Thursday 9: At Burslem. Mr Boudarde. Mr & Miss Bent of Besford called in my absence.

 

Friday 10: At home. Mr Wood, Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Saturday 11: Do.

 

Sunday 12: Do.

 

Monday 13: Do. Engaged on the Farm &c.

 

Tuesday 14: At Betley calling on Mrs Tollett but Mr Tollett had gone away the day before. Called at Sr. Thos. Fletchers. Miss S & Eliza returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Sr. Thos. & Lady Fletcher made a long call, some conversation with Sr .Thos. relative to the Customs & Times within the Manor of Audley.

 

Thursday 16: At Newcastle. Engaged at the Brewery & appointed to accompany T. Sparrow to the Genl. Assembly at Stone on Tuesday next & to attend the Mayor & Corporation of Newcastle on Wednesday at their Sessions in order to take the oaths &c as Recorder. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 17: At home.

 

Page 184

[Transcribers note. The numbers ascribed to the days by JC are as written but are in fact one day out. Saturday should be the 18th.]

Saturday 19: Dined at Sr. Thos. Fletchers with Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood Miss W. & Mr & Mrs Broughton

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: Engaged all morning at Alsager looking over Taxes to be taken for the intended new Buildings at Linley Wood. Alcock

[Transcribers note. This is the first time JC has referred to the house as Linley Wood within the body of the diary. The only other time the name has been given in full is when the house was bought in 1794, ref. p. 110]

 

Tuesday 22: At Stone attending General Assembly of the Navigation.

 

Wednesday 23: At Newcastle attending the Sessions & qualifying for the Office of Recorder to which I had been unanimously elected. Dined with the Mayor & Justices &c at the Roebuck & slept at Sparrows.

 

Thursday 24: Returned home to dinner.

 

Friday 25: Sr. Thos. Lady & W. Fletcher with Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood. Mrs Wedgwood & Miss Wedgwood dined.

 

Saturday 26: At Newcastle dined at Admiral Child's.

 

Sunday 27: Dined at Capt. Sneyds relative to appointing persons to receive the agricultural Claims.

 

Monday 28: At home.

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Mr Skerrett came relative to the intended new Building. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 30: Engaged all morning at Alsager with Mr Skerrett looking over Timber.

 

May, Thursday 1: Mr Skerrett returned. At Newcastle engaged all day settling the Brewery Books for the last half year. staid all night. Miss Fletcher at Linley.

 

Friday 2: Returned home to dinner after a Meeting relative to Newcastle Races. In the afternoon Dr. Mrs & Miss Crompton arrived.

 

Saturday 3: Called at Rodehall but Mr Wilbrahim from home.

 

Sunday 4: Mr Jos. Wedgwood called.

 

Page 185

Monday 5: At home. Weather remarkably dry. Dr Crompton & Edwd. left Linley. Alcock.

[written in the RH margin alongside the following] Vid. Walkers Sermon on the right of individual judgement. Preached at Chewbent 25th June 1800.

The right of individual judgement in matters of religion, is a principle of immutable stability, and on which religion's liberty must rest. At the same time it must be confessed that the cause of liberality is often most illiberally defended; and that many who contend most strenuously for this right, measure the exercise of it by their own opinions. To the Churchman as well as to the Dissenter, for instance, the right equally appertains; and yet any degree of external conformity unaccompanied by conscientious correction has been sincerely reprobated, and from thence the enlargement of the Dissentient Church warmly argued. But it may be asked and fairly asked too, does not the very principle itself, give to every Man the right of determining how far his disapprobation of parts of an established creed, ought to operate in making him hostile to the whole, and require him to become an avowed and active Dissenter? That Man is not only justified but bound to separate, who feels that conscience and by fair investigation dictate it; but may not another person equally influenced by conscience and the fair result of his injuries, as well as actuated by a love of peace & harmony, deem it to be no less his duty to abide by the established system, as far as outward appearance extends, while it is in his opinion sufficient for the purpose of virtue and piety, though his approbation of it be not unqualified and complete. Instances are not wanting of men of very discriminating understandings who although they perceived errors in the public ritual, preferred their own selection in rehearsing the common prayer, to the abandonment of themselves to the extemporaneous devotion, which is common in dissenting characters. And as it is vain to look for, or expect a public service, which shall throughout exactly correspond with the statements and feelings of each individual and one unpleasant

 

Page 186

auditor. Men without intending to be either hypocritical or insincere may think, that by writing themselves to any hostile Church, they shall not attain to a perfect satisfaction of mind, but only exchange one difficulty and one unpleasant circumstance for others.

Vid. Monthly Review for March 1801 p. 334 for the greater part of the above Observations.

 

Tuesday 6: Mr & Mrs Turner & Miss Willett dined.

 

Wednesday 7: Mrs & Miss Crompton left Linley. Dined at Etruria with Mr & Mrs Turner Mrs & Miss Willett.

 

Thursday 8: At Burslem. Boudarde.

 

Friday 9: At home. Ann & Bessy arrived from Nantwich, having been fetched by Miss Stamford.

 

Saturday 10: Mr & Mrs Turner & Miss Willett dined & staid all night.

 

Sunday 11: Mr Turner performed the Service. Returned in the Evg. 

 

Monday 12: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: Miss Stamford Bessy & Mary set out to London. Mrs Blunt arrived & Ann returned in the Chaise to Newcastle.

 

Wednesday 14: Dined at Newcastle at Mr Wm Bents with Mr & Mrs Wright of Liverpool & Mr Mrs & Miss Bent of Batsford.

 

Thursday 15: Mr Blunt & Stamford & Mr Turner dined & staid all night.

 

Friday 16: At home. Mr Blunt & Mr Turner returned to Newcastle

 

Saturday 17: At home

3 Roods of Land (eight square yards to the Rood) with five pecks of potatoes for seed if well managed will produce 15 bushels or 1200 pounds. 30 weeks at 40 pounds a week.

 

Sunday 18: At home. Fine showers

 

Monday 19: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 20: Eliza took Mrs Blunt to Newcastle. Mr & Mrs Wood & family came to spend a few days. Mr Penlington dined.

 

Page 187

Wednesday 21: At home engaged with Mr Woods &c.

 

Thursday 22: Do: Boudarde. I this day broke the ground for the new stables: & the digging for the foundations was begun.

 

Friday 23: At home. Engaged with the Woods

 

Saturday 24: Mr & Mrs Woods & family left us. In the Evening Mr & Mrs Wm Bent arrived.

 

[Note. dates are correct from now on - see page 184]

Sunday 24: Mr Cox breakfasted relative to Mr Chantins business with Mr Skerrett.  Mr S came about 10. Mr Wood to dinner. Mr S Mr Wood & Mr W Bent went in the course of the afternoon.

 

Monday 25: Mrs W. B returned. At Newcastle fair. Dined at W. B.

 

Tuesday 26: Eliza & Lissy went to Newcastle. Engaged about the farm.

 

Wednesday 27: At home. Engaged with the workmen at the new stables & in the farmyard raising the pavement in order to . . .[find] the water higher.

 

Thursday 28: At Newcastle attending Meeting as a Commr. for final Divd. in Danl. Morris's Banktcy

 

Friday 29: At home. engaged with workmen

 

Saturday 30: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 31: Do.

 

June, Monday 1: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 2: Do.

 

Wednesday 3: Dined at Talk on the Hill. Agriculture Meeting. Mr Skerrett.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Boudarde. Fritch

 

Friday 5: At Newcastle, from thence to Etruria calling upon Mr Wedgwood. Dined at Burslem & drank tea at Mr T Wedgwoods.

 

Saturday 6: At home.

 

Sunday 7: Do.

 

Page 188

Monday 8: At home. The anniversary of the happy day which seventeen years ago united me to the best of friends & the most amicable of women; & my respect & esteem for whom can be equalled only by the tenderness of the passion which is so far from having abated seems every day to glow with increasing ardour. With such a tonic of Recollections as mine, how indeed could all this be otherwise?

 

Tuesday 9: Do. The stone masons who had not come to work the last week owing to their being engaged at Trentham returned, & the stables were set about with vigour.

 

Wednesday 10: Engaged with the workmen. In the forenoon at Newcastle on various matters

 

Thursday 11: At home engaged with the workmen. Boudarde.

 

Friday 12: Eliza & I dined at Newcastle at Mr Wm Bents with Mr & Mrs James Hardman, who in the evening returned with us to Linley.

 

Saturday 13: Mr & Mrs Hardman left us on their return home.

 

Sunday 14: At home

 

Monday 15: Do. Engaged with the workmen

 

Tuesday 16: Do. Messrs. Sneyd, Sparrow, Hollins, Adams, Fenton, Poole & Wallhall dined.

 

Wednesday 17: At home.

 

Thursday 18: Mr Wood dined. Boudarde. In the evening went to Nantwich to attend the funeral of Miss Skerrett.

 

Friday 19: After the funeral dined at Mr Skerretts & in the evening returned home.

 

Saturday 20: Mr. Blunt & John dined & staid all night.

 

Sunday 21: At home.

 

Monday 22: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At Burslem. In the evening Hannah & Mary with Bessy returned from London.

 

Page 189

Wednesday 24: At home. Mr Skerrett came to dinner. Engaged with the workmen. Eliza &c called at Etruria.

 

Thursday 25: Stamford laid the first stone of the new wing to the house. In the afternoon cut down the large Scotch fir in the front, owing to its beginning to die at the top & decay.

 

Friday 26: Dined at the Boot at Talk on the Hill where I gave a dinner to about twenty of the farmers & neighbours who had assisted me in carrying gravel for the new Road & Sand . . . &c for the new Buildings.

 

Saturday 27: At home in the Morning. In the afternoon went to Newcastle to attend the entrance of the Horse. Their being little expectation of discussion the first matched the little bay horse to run against Mr Tho. Fentons gy. mare.

 

Sunday 28: Dined at Mr Sparrows at Newcastle previous to my attending the Mayor & Corporation to Church in the afternoon as Recorder, which I had the day before engaged to do. An excellent sermon from Blunt, on the inefficacy of Faith without works, which had he known of my attendance I should have thought applicable to the occasion.  In the evening called at Bradwall with Sparrow & prevailed upon Captn. Sneyd to permit me to nominate him as one of the Stewards at the succeeding Races.

 

Monday 29: In the morning called at Rode Hall, but Mr Wilbrahim not returned. Alcock. In the afternoon very unwell.

 

Tuesday 30: So unwell as to be in bed the greatest part of the day; but in the Evening better. Boudarde.

 

[Headed June by JC but actually July]

June. Wednesday 1: At Newcastle Hannah, Eliza Lissy & myself at Mr Bents. Dined at the Ordinary as Steward. Very full attendance from the Match. In the evening the largest attendance at the Ball that had been known at Newcastle. Everything went off well.

 

Page 190

Thursday 2: Full ordinary again at the Shakespeare; and a most crowded house at the Play.

 

Friday 3: Returned home by Burslem. Gratified as I could not but be, by the marks of respect & attention which I had experienced during the two last days.

 

Saturday 4: At home engaged with the workmen &c.

 

Sunday 5: Do. Service &c. as usual. In the Evening Mrs Skerrett arrived on their annual visit.

 

Monday 6: At home. Much engaged with the workmen.

 

Tuesday 7: Do. Do. In the evening Mr Skerrett.

 

Wednesday 8: At home engaged with Mr Skerrett & the workmen.

 

Thursday 9: Do. Do. Boudarde

 

Friday 10: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 11: At Burslem with Mr Skerrett & Miss Stamford

 

Sunday 12: At home.

 

Monday 13: Do. Mr Skerrett & I engaged with the workmen. 

 

Tuesday 14: Do. Do. Mr Blunt came to dinner.

 

Wednesday 15: Do.

 

Thursday 16: Mr Yoxall Mr Thos. Yoxall Mr Adams & Mr & Mrs R Skerrett dined

 

Friday 17: At home. Blunt left us. Boudarde. In the evening Mr Skerrett left us.

 

Saturday 18: At home.

 

Sunday 19: Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 20: At home. Alcock. In the evening Mrs Skerrett left us. Began mowing the meadow.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. In the evening in running with Mary got a severe sprain in the thigh.

 

Page 191

Wednesday 22: Confined to the house in consequence of the accident

 

Thursday 23: Do. with much pain. Mr N & Miss Lawrences called.

 

Friday 24: Do.

Dr. Anderson observes on the subject of Quick lime as a Manure, that we are unacquainted with the mode in which lime operates as a Manure, but that contrary to the prevailing Theory he considers it amongst the enriching manures, instead of being a mere exciting manure, because it operates upon poor land, and had failed on Land impregnated with dung, & therefore exactly in the state in which the Theory supposes that lime should produce greatest effect.

He says, there is but one kind of calcareous matter, and that all the varieties of calcareous substances, such as Marl &c are entirely occasioned by a diversity in the nature of the extraneous bodies with which they are united.

That it is a mistaken idea, that lime in the end, renders land more steril(sic) than formerly.

Recommends to plough the lime in, instead of laying it upon the grass.

The best lime is that which swells very much in slaking, [combining with water] is light, fine to the touch, and of a pure white.

In case of an accident by which a horse or a man is scalded from working amongst lime, he recommends to wash well the part affected with verysour milk or whey; which will destroy the poignancy of the lime. The sourer the milk or whey the better. For want of this vinegar, or stale wine, but the milk or whey the best remedy.

 

Saturday 25: Still confined with much pain.

 

Sunday 26: Do. Captn Sneyd & Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 27: Do. Alcock. Thos Walls came as Butler & Postman 21 Gs per annum. Finished the Hay Harvest in the meadows. Got without rain

 

Tuesday 28: Do. In the afternoon Mr Gilbert called & Mr Bent

 

Wednesday 29: Do. Mr Gilbert dined.

 

Thursday 30: Do: But the symptoms began to abate. Mrs John Wedgwood & Mrs Fearn dined. Boudarde.

 

Page 192

[Page heading] July

Friday 31: Still confined.

 

August, Saturday 1: Do.

 

Sunday 2: Do.

 

Monday 3: Walked out. Nearly finished the Hay Harvest.

 

Tuesday 4: Do.

 

Wednesday 5: Rode out in the afternoon & saw Mr & Mrs Wm Hardman at Talk.

 

Thursday 6: Not so well. Boudarde & in the Evening Mr Keys.

 

Friday 7: Set the Roof upon the additional building to the House

 

Saturday 8: At home. Finished with the Stone masons.

 

Sunday 9: Mr & Mrs Wm Bent came to dinner. In the afternoon Mr Wood.

 

Monday 10: Bent returned with Stamford leaving Mrs Bent at Linley. Alcock. Began cutting oats before the house.

 

Tuesday 11: Eliza & I took Mrs Bent home in the Carriage. The two eldest girls walked to Newcastle.  Attended general Meeting of Agricultural Society, returned home in the Evg.

 

Wednesday 12: At home. In the evg. Dr Crompton Ldr. & Henry arrived.

 

Thursday 13: Dr Crompton left us this morning. Boudarde. Mr Wilbrahim called

 

Friday 14: Eliza & I with Lissy & Ann went to Burslem & from there to Longport calling upon Mrs Williamson & Mr Henshall & afterwards dined at Burslem.

 

Saturday 15: At home.

 

Sunday 16: At home.

 

Monday 17: Do. Alcock. In the evening called at Mr Gilberts to ask him to meet the two Mr Bents & Mr Watkiss to dinner in Wednesday. Found the riding on horseback still very incommodious from my hurt. Mr G not at home.

 

Page 193

Tuesday 18: At home.

 

Wednesday 19: Mr & Mrs Watkiss Mr & Miss Bent Mr & Mrs Wm Bent & Mr Gilbert dined Gave Mr Bent the following . . .[imperative] Statement of building with Stone or brick at Linley Wood

[Large section of page left blank]

 

Thursday 20: At home much engaged in the harvest. Boudarde. Mr Lawton sent a present of fruit,

 

Friday 21: At home. finished carrying the oats in the field before the house. In the evening Miss Stamford returned.

 

Saturday 22: Dined at Mr Gilberts with Mr Wittenhall, Watkiss & Wm Bent. Agreed to give Notice in order to prevent the depredation of Gamekeepers

 

Sunday 23: At home.

 

Monday 24: Do. In the morning Mr Skerrett arrived with whom

 

Page 194

engaged all day. Captn Sneyd called. In the evening carried wheat. A very fine & abundant crop. Carried till one oclock in the morning.

 

Tuesday 25: Engaged with Mr Skerrett &c. In the Afternoon Mrs Byerly &c. drank tea. very busy cutting oats.

 

Wednesday 26: Mr Skerrett returned early. Sr. Tho. Lady & Miss Fletcher called. Sr Tho. & I executed the Deeds in which I am named as a Trustee for Mr [?W] Fletcher. Mr Wood dined.

 

Thursday 27: At home. Boudarde.

 

Friday 28: Do. Engaged with the workmen & carrying oats. Mr Eardley relative to the reference made to me of the Cause of Roebotham v Rogers, when I appointed Thursday the 3rd Sep. for the purpose at the Swan Talk.

 

Saturday 29: At home. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 30: Do.

 

Monday 31: Do. In the evening Mr Adams of Newcastle arrived on a shooting expedition.

 

September, Tuesday 1: Went out with Mr Adams. Killed the first bird I shot at being a single one. Mr Adams returned in the afternoon having killed 3½ brace & a mallard. Mr Beckett Mr R Skerrett & Mr Adams dined.

 

Wednesday 2: Out again but without success. Adams killed only one bird & a leveret. Mr Adams returned in the evening.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Boudarde

 

Friday 4: Do. Mr & Mrs Broughton called.

 

Saturday 5: Eliza Hannah & Lissy went to Newcastle. Mr Beckett dined. Engaged all te afternoon with him in settling accounts relative to the . . . in the Marsh

 

Page 195

With regard to myself, I honestly confess, that I am sincerely attached to the present (Mr Pitts) administration, and that I take a decided part with it, not on account of any personal connexions(sic), for I have not the honour of being acquainted with any of the Members of it, but because a full investigation of the subject, has convinced me, that not the British Ministry, but the French Rulers alone, were the authors of the war.

Preface to Marshs Hist. of the Politics of G. B. & France.

 

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[blank]

 

Page 197

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Page 198

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Page 199

November, Wednesday 4: At home. Engaged settling accounts &c. Letters &c.

 

Thursday 5: Do. Gradually recovering.

 

Friday 6: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 7: Do. Do. Fever much abated.

 

Sunday 8: Do. Went through the service as usual. Mr Bent dined.

The late establishment of the Roman Catholic religion in France, which seems to me to be pregnant with greater consequences and to have originated in deeper political motives than may at first view be imagined, recalls to my mind the following observation upon it made by Robertson in his Hist. of Scotland by De Lolme on the Cons . . . of Eng.

"Popery is a species of false religion, remarkable for the strong impression it takes of the heart. Contrived by men of deep insight in the human character, and improved by the experience and observation of many successive ages, it arrived at last to a degree of perfection, which no former system of superstition had ever attained. There is no power in the understanding, and no passion in the heart, to which it does not present objects adapted to rouse and interest them."

Vol 1. p.349.

De Lolme says " - A Religion which repeated Acts of the Legislature had proscribed; and proscribed, not because it tended to establish in England the doctrines of transubstantiation and purgatory, doctrines in themselves of so political moment, but because the unlimited power of the Sovereign had always been made one of its principal tenets."

De Lolme p. 57.

What is the present state of France, and the wealth at this moment of all horrors & devastation occasioned by the Revolution? Liberty has already given place to military despotism, and the . . . overthrow of religious prejudices & the ancient system of Superstition.

 

Page 200

Monday 9: Remarkably fine mild day. Alcock. In the Evening the three Miss Hardmans arrived.

 

Tuesday 10: Engaged on the farm.

 

Wednesday 11: At home. Do. Stamford came home in consequence of the illness of Mrs Blunt.

 

Thursday 12: In the Morning at Burslem. Received the intelligence of the death of Mrs Blunt and on my return a Letter from Mr Blunt on the occasion. In the Eveng. Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 13: "Many sages and politicians have fondly extolled and strenuously recommended Representative Governments. Under these forms, it has been said, the governor sought only the good of the governed; while the latter in each exchange for subjection, shares in every comfort and in every blessing which endear and give value to existence. Recent experiences however, - that which the directional rule in a neighbouring country furnishes has not only ill corresponded with but has completely contradicted this Theory. While that

political regimen prevailed all authority was derived from Sufferage; and surely never was power entrusted to more unworthy or more incompetent hands. Had minions and mistresses appointed the occupiers of places of trust and influence, could they have been worse filled? In what age, or in what country, have rulers shown more want of dignity, greater propriety to abuse found, and more aptitude to betray their trusts, than were exhibited by these persons; whose misconduct had occasioned the French to embrace usurpation and military Tyranny as boons, to receive their yoke with pleasure, and to bless them who imposed it on them?

Appendix to the 35th Vol. of Monthly Review P. 477.

Those who are carions in observing the caprices of the human mind, and desirous of drawing practical influences, will find an ample fund in the events of the French Revolution which may teach.

 

Page 201

Friday 13: At home. Wet day.

 

Saturday 14: At Newcastle. spent the whole of the Forenoon with Blunt & returned to a late dinner.

 

Sunday 15: At home. Service as usual.

Mr Erskine in his Speech on the Convention with Russia, as supported in the Star of Saturday the 24th inst. was the following expressions.

"I know that the Country in which Providence had cast my lot, is the sphere of my duties; and therefore must be the chief object of my affections. We cannot embrace all alike. Our attachment must proceed from the near to the more distant objects. Like the circles made by the pebble in the water, our affections must expand in the same system. Here is the sphere of our duties; here, the dearest the immediate object of our regard and devotion. It is our own country that first demands our love, our cares, our wishes, our hopes. But if we can save the honour of other nations whilst we secure our own it is true magnanimity.

I was pleased with, and transcribe the passage as a good definition of real patriotism & rational philanthropy.

 

Monday 16: At home. Engaged all morning planting the ground in the stable yard &c. Alcock. In the evening Musick.

 

Tuesday 17: At Newcastle attending the Funeral of Mrs Blunt. Service performed by Mr John Fenton. Of this beautiful & deserving woman, I can truly say, that I never saw her do nor ever heard her say a thing, that offended my judgement or my feelings or that I wished undone or unsaid. She afforded a peculiar example of that propriety which without any striking perfection, desirous general excellence together with that necessary union of good sense & good disposition which forms what is not valuable respectable & amiable in female character.

 

Wednesday 18:At home engaged in planting &c. Mr Wood dined

 

Page 202

Thursday 19: At home. Boudarde.

 

Friday 20: At Newcastle. Engaged in the morning at the Brewery. Dined at Mr Hollins's with a Party & slept at Mr Bents.

 

Saturday 21: Returned to dinner. Miss Hardmans gone this morning. Mr Wilbrahim called. Roads, Packham Estate &c &c.

 

Sunday 22: At home. Service as usual.

 

Monday 23: Do. Engaged planting &c. Alcock. Joshua Rigby & family went from Linley,

 

Tuesday 24: Do. Do. receiving Mr Penlingtons Rents, Mr P. dined much discussion relative to his affairs &c.

 

Wednesday 25: Do. Engaged on the farm in various matters.

 

Thursday 26: Do. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 27: At Newcastle settling & adjusting the annual Accts. of the Brewery.

 

Saturday 28: Returned home in the afternoon having been busily engaged all the morning in the Counting House.

In the Committee of the House of Commons on the Distilleries & high price of Corn on Tuesday last (vid. Star) Mr Vansittart stated that it appeared to the Committee of that House appointed to enquire into the causes of the high price of provisions in 1799, that the crop of barley in Great Britain in a year of ordinary plenty, was five Millions of quarters out of which the consumption of the distilleries in no year exceeded 300,000 quarters or at most one twentieth part of the whole.

This fact is alone sufficient to show how little pretence the opening of the distilleries would afford for keeping up the price of Corn: and it should also be kept in mind that not less than 60,000 hogs are computed to be fed annually by the distilleries & brought into the market in rid of Butchers meat.

The public revenue is about £400,000 per annum.

 

Page 203

 

Sunday 29: At home. Engaged as usual.

 

Monday 30: Do. on the farm various occupations

The new Husbandry so often quoted by agricultural writers, without a definition, consists, "In allotting certain portions of an arable farm to the purpose of summer and winter feeding a stock of Cattle, sufficient, with their dung to manure and fertilize the whole of the land. In the eradicating as far as possible, all useless vegetation with the hoe. In the use of the various improved, or newly invented implements for the purpose of expediting or abridging labour, and in the judicious solution of domestic animals."

New Turners Calendar p. 160

Alcock who staid all night. In the Evening. Musick. 

 

December, Tuesday 1: Do. Ploughing before the house. On this piece I have laid about four tons of lime to the acre, after a crop of Oats.

 

Wednesday 2: At home. Engaged all morning in private Accounts &c.

 

Thursday 3: Do. Do. In the arrangement of Letters, papers &c.

 

Friday 4: Do. Do. all day. In the evening began to read to the children short lectures in natural experimental Philosophy, or those laws by which the material universe in ground, most enables us to account for the various appearances in nature; and one of its most important uses is, in enabling us to apply these principles to many of the common concerns & operations of life, and thereby not only to explain, but perform them with greater ease and advantage.

 

Saturday 5: At home.

 

Sunday 6: Do.

 

Monday 7: Do. Engaged in arranging papers &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 8: Do. in the forenoon Mr Skerrett arrived

 

Wednesday 9: Do. Engaged all morning with Mr Skerrett on various matters particularly Mr Penlingtons affairs, perusing papers &c. &c. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Page 204

Thursday 10: Engaged with Mr Skerrett, who this morning settled with Mr Dale for him to have the Alsager Estate in the Spring of 1803 & which he agreed to do. Mr Blunt came to dinner  & in the Evening Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 11: Mr Skerrett left us after breakfast. Called upon Mr Gilbert with various papers & Letters relative to the settlement of Mr Day Broughtons saltworks affairs with St. Thos Broughton, in which Mr B had consulted me and the proposed arbitration; & left all the papers Accounts &c. which I had received from Mr B. with Mr Gilbert.

 

Saturday 12: At home. Engaged about the farm.

 

Sunday 13: Do.

 

Monday 14: Do.

 

Tuesday 15: At Newcastle dining with Mr Thos. Sparrow. Extreme wet day.

 

Wednesday 16: At home. Engaged in settling various Accts. &c.

 

Thursday 17: Do. Boudarde.

 

Friday 18: At Burslem

 

Saturday 19: At Newcastle meeting Mr Wood relative to Mr Browes Coals &c. Brewery. Mr Sparrow relative to the Arbitration Roebotham & Rogers. Plant relative to the Reference to the Sheriff of the County & myself of Barlow & Swinnertons Cause in Chancery with various parties at . . .[Cheadh] respecting making Containers &c. Mr Wood returned with me to Linley to dinner. At night Tho. Wall & Th. Hill went off. Alarm from fire in the dining room.

 

Sunday 20: At home. In the evening very . . . I hear.

 

Monday 21: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: Do.

How silly and how dangerous is the error of considering the rejection of general opinion as a mark

 

Page 205

of superior understanding?

 

Wednesday 23: At home.

The following is a comparison between the average weight of Bullocks &c at it was 100 years ago and as it is as present. viz:

Bullocks              100 years ago          on average        370 lbs  now 800

Calves                        Do.                        Do.                 50 lbs          140

Sheep                         Do.                        Do.                 28 lbs            80

Lambs                        Do.                        Do.                 18 lbs            50

Notwithstanding this increase of size, the number of Beasts has increased in the proportion which appears from the following averages (containing nine years each) of the Cattle & Sheep sold in Smithfield Market from the year 1731 viz.559,891

1732 to 1740 inclusive       yearly average          Cattle 83,906  Sheep 564,650 

1741 to 1749  Do.                    Do.                                74,194              559,891

1750 to 1758  Do.                    Do.                                75,331              623,091

1759 to 1767  Do.                    Do.                                83,472              615,328

1768 to 1776  Do.                    Do.                                89,362              627,805 

1777 to 1785  Do.                    Do.                                99,285              687,588

1786 to 1794  Do.                    Do.                              101,075              707,456

The average of the last 7 years is understood to have exceeded any o f the former.

 

Thursday 24: At Newcastle on various matters, Boudarde.

 

Friday 25: At home.

 

Saturday 26: Do. Engaged on various papers.

 

Sunday 27: Do. Mr Barron dined.

 

Monday 28: Do. Engaged at the farm on various matters. Alcock

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Do. & Altering the plantation at the Turn into the Stable yard. Received from Peake his Compendium of the Law of Evidence.

 

Wednesday 30: Do. Perused a great deal of Peakes Book.

 

Thursday 31: Do. Boudarde.

 

 

 

 

 

Page 158

 

Friday 6: At home. In the evening rode out with Eliza in the gig.

"We shall suffer the most eventful season ever witnessed in the affairs of men, to pass over our heads to very little purpose, if we fail to learn from it some awful lessons on the nature and progress of the passions.

Among the various passions which that Revolution (The French) has so strikingly displayed, none is more conspicuous than vanity; nor is it difficult, without adverting to the national character of the people, to account for its extraordinary predominance. Political power, the most seducing object of ambition, never before circulated through so many Lands; the prospect of possessing it was never before presented to so many minds. Multitudes, who by their birth and education, and not unfrequently by their talents, seemed destined to perpetual obscurity, wise by the alternative rise and fall of parties, . . .[describe] into distinction, and shared in the functions of Government. The short livid forms of power and office glided with such rapidity through successive ranks of degradation, from the Court to the very dregs of the populace, that they seemed rather to solicit acceptance than to be a prize contented for; yet as it was still impossible for all to possess authority though none were willing to obey, a general impatience to . . .[break] through the ranks and rush into the foremost ground, maddened and infuriated the nation, and overwhelmed law, order, and civilization with the violence of a torrent."

Halles Sermon on Infidelity p. 32

Infusing into those interested with the enaction of laws a spirit of rash innovation and daring empiricism, a disdain of the established usages of mankind, a foolish desire to dazzle the world with new and untried systems of policy, in which the precedents of antiquity and the experience of ages are only consulted to be trodden under foot; and into the executive department of Government a fierce contention for pre eminence, an incessant struggle to supplant and destroy, with a propensity to calumny and suspicion, proscription and massacre.

Ibid.

 

Saturday 7: At home

 

Sunday 8: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 9:Do.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Engaged in perusing Act of Parliament &c previous to attending Newcastle junction Canal Meeting tomorrow.

 

Page 159

 

Wednesday 11: At Newcastle attending Canal Meeting & afterwards dined at Mr Wm Bents. First time that I had put on a boot since my accident. Eliza & Miss Stamford & Lissy drank tea at Mrs Willetts. Returned with them in the Carriage.

 

Thursday 12: At home. Mr Boudarde. Mr Skerrett came. Mr & Mrs Wilbrahim called.

 

Friday 13: Do. Engaged with Mr Skerrett.

 

Saturday 14: Mr Skerrett returned. At Burslem. Mr & Mrs Blunt & Messrs. Brazier & . . .[Horcop] dined.

 

Sunday 15: At home. Mrs Blunt.

 

Monday 16: Mrs Blunt returned with Stamford. Went with Mr & Mrs Wilbraham to the works at Burslem & afterwards dined with them at Rodehall. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 17:At home.

 

Wednesday 18: At Newcastle dining with Mr Kinnersly, Sr. Jno Heathcote, Messrs Manwaring, Swinnerton Henshall & self.

 

Thursday 19: At home. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 20: Do.

 

Saturday 21: Do. Mr & Miss Swinnerton & Mr Blunt dined. Called on the Mr S in the  morning at Rode hall & Lawton Hall

 

Sunday 22: Do. At home

 

Monday 23: At Burslem. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 24: Went to Nantwich with Eliza in the Gig. Penlingtons affairs &c.

 

Wednesday 25: At Nantwich

 

Thursday 26: Returned home after a very pleasant excursion

 

Friday 27: Mr & Mrs Lawrence & family arrived in the evening.

 

Saturday 28: At home. engaged with Mr Lawrence

 

Sunday 29: Do. Smiths attempt to assassinate Mr Wainwright

 

Monday 30: Do. Alcock

 

July, Tuesday 1: At Burslem

 

Wednesday 2: Mr Lawrence left Linley in the morning. At Newcastle Races dined at the Ordinary at the Crown & in the Evg. at the Ball with Eliza & Hannah.

 

Page 160

July, Thursday 3: At Newcastle again. Dined at the Roebuck. Appointed Steward for the ensuing year on the nomination of Mr Egerton with Mr Wilbraham. In the Evg. at the Theatre.

 

Friday 4: at home.

 

Saturday 5: Mrs Lawrence & the Boys left us. Ann & Bessy arrived from Nantwich. Mr & Mrs Turner & Mrs & Miss Willett came to dinner.

 

Sunday 6 At home. Mr Turner performed the Service.

 

Monday 7: At Burslem with Mr Turner.

 

Tuesday 8: Mr & Mrs Turner & the Willetts left Linley. Mrs Skerrett arrived.

 

Wednesday 9: At Nantwich Races. dined at the Ordinary at the Crown.

 

Thursday 10: Do. dined at Mr Thos. Gametts. Mr Skerrett returned with me in the Evg. Mr Barber had arrived this morning. Found on my return Letter from Dr Percival with an addl. Vol. of a Fathers Instructions.

 

Friday 11: At home. Began mowing

 

Saturday 12: Do: Engaged with Haymakers &c.

 

Sunday 13: Mr & Mrs Turner came. Dined myself at Sr. Thos. Fletchers; Bent &c.

 

Monday 14: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 15: Do. Mr Yoxall & Mr Adams dined

 

Wednesday 16: Do. 

 

Thursday 17: Do. Mr Wood dined. In the afternoon Mr Barber left Linley. Sold a feeding Cow £14

 

Friday 18: Do. Fishing at the Bath Pool. finished mowing

 

Saturday 19: At Newcastle pursuant to appointment with Mr Jos. Adams on his affairs with Mr T Sparrow relative to the New Arrangements of the Salt affairs. Returned to dinner & brought Miss Stamford in the gig. Appointed with Mr T Sparrow to attend a Commr. in Palins & Birks's Banktcy, and in a Reference . . . to one the first mark after the assizes.

 

Sunday 20: At home. read Sickers excellent sermon from the Text 'Man saith the Lord of Hosts Consider your . . .' A composition which I consider as a Masterpiece of Pulpit eloquence.

 

Page 161

Monday 21: At Burslem with Mr Skerrett in the Gig. finished Hay harvest except  . . . all. . . pieces about the corn &c. Mr Burgiss paying off his late Mothers Mortge.

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Messrs. Wm. Thos & Jno Garnett dined. Alcock, his son & Bagnall. Musick.

 

Wednesday 23: At Rode Heath with Mr Skerrett on Mr Penlingtons affairs & the proposed Reference of Mr Salmon's Account to Dr. Tho. Broughton & Mr S. Blunt came to dinner. Mr Skerrett left us in the Evening.

 

Thursday 24: At home. In the Afternoon at the Bath Pool fishing. Took one brace of Carp. Mrs Skerrett left us in the Evening.

 

Friday 25: At home.

"It has been estimated by political arithmeticians that the daily employment of the working hands in every state during the space of four hours, is adequate to the full supply, for all its Members of food, raiment, and habitation."

Percivals Fathers Instructions part 3.

 

Friday 25: At home.

" The judicious maxim, mullins jurare in ouba magistic is construed to imply a bold opposition to every established opinion. And as these may be what Lord Bacon happily turns "a superstitious fear of superstition" then may also subsist a prejudice so strong against supposed prejudice, as to be come with literary men, especially of a metaphysical turn, one great source of Scepticism and infidelity.

Instead of the evidence of Christianity being weakened by the numerous histories of Miracles which are boasted by the votaries of every religion, they are in fact confined by them. For amongst all those histories not one can be produced which does not differ from the narrative of the gospels, in circumstances of the most decisive importance, in the nature of the evidence by which it is supported, or of the facts it relates."

Elringtons Sermons

In confirmation of the above judicious and important observation, it may be remarked, that in respect tp the miracles alleged to have been performed by Vespasian in obedience to a vision of the God Serapis, the partizans(sic) who supported his

 

Page 162

pretensions availed themselves of such artifices as were suited to the superstitions of the age. It is, indeed, evident that Vespasian himself was engaged in the plot of Imposition. For when he visited the temple of Serapis, to consult that God concerning the fate of the empire. he commanded all to retire, that he might without fear of contradiction pretend to have seen the vision of Basilides, then confined by sickness at a considerable distance from Alexandria, whose name and presence were to be alleged as the assurance of divine favour.

Instead of any direct testimony of Eye witnesses of the facts performed by Christ Jacitus, on whose authority so much reliance has been placed only assures us that in his time the events contained to be recounted and averred by those who had been Eye witnesses , and could reap no advantage from their flattery. Thus . . . the strength of the Evidence at least one & in the most important . . . But the narrative of Jacitus affords no reason even to conjecture that he himself gave credit to these miracles. The accounts delivered too appear to have varied so essentially, and in such striking particulars, that it was impossible that they should have proceeded from Eye witnesses. Sactonius represents that the limb restored was the leg, and Jacitus the arm. The former speaks of the person who was seen by Vespasian in the Temple as a poor man; the latter as a grandee of Egypt.

It should also be observed, that the Physicians who were ordered by Vespasian to examine whether the lameness and blindness were curable by human aid, reported, that in the one the power of sight was not wholly extinct, but would return were the obstacles removed; and, in the other, the joints were only disturbed & might be restored with regular . . . Vid

Note to Ant. Un. HIst. Vol 15. p. 22.

"In the small collection of only nine cures (performed at the tomb of Abbe Paris) there is not one that possesses the characteristics which prove the interference of divine

 

Page 163

power; not one in which a disorder clearly beyond the influence of the imagination was instantaneously and perfectly removed: Nay more not one of any kind in health and strength were completely and at once restored.

Where ignorance and superstition have prevailed, where interest excites to deceit, and power protects it from detection, where few are willing to doubt, and where none can with safety enquire, instances may occur in which the artifices of men, who took advantages of these circumstances have imposed upon the Multitude. But how is Christianity affected by this? If an instance were produced in which miracles were successfully pretended to arrange such a people as I have described, by persons adverse to their superstitions we then might admit the objection to have weight." Elrington at sup.

 

Saturday 26: At home. In the afternoon fishing again at the Bath Pool with Mr Kinnersly. I took 22 brace of fine carp of which I had six which turned into the water at the farm.

 

Sunday 27: Do. very hot

 

Monday 28: Do. In the morning fine shower of Rain

 

Tuesday 29: Do.

 

Wednesday 30: Hannah & Ann with two of the Children set off for Burlington. Still very hot. Alcock

 

Thursday 31: At home. In the afternoon fishing again at the Bath Pool when we took 25 brace of carp of which I had 8 brace & ½ which I turned into the water at . . .[Terhaas]. Mr & Mrs K & 2 of the young ladies drank tea at Linley.

 

August, Friday 1: Sold a cow to Philip Wood for £11:15 cost £5:8. In the afternoon at Newcastle with Eliza, Lissy & Bess. Drank tea at Mrs Blunts & afterwards went to the Play. Went myself through the Brewery with Mr W Bent with whom I had much conversation & who mentioned to me the . . .[following] substitute for Barm [froth on fermenting malt liquor] substitute.1lb of starch. 1 lb of brown sugar & 2 quarts of small beer Gently boiled together. afterwards add 1 quart of Barm.

 

Page 164

Saturday 2: At Burslem, Mr Wood being at Buxton. Return this week £700. In the Evg. engaged in drawing up Rules & Regultn. for the Agricultural Society proposed to be instituted at Newcastle under the direction of Capn. Sneyd & myself & the first meeting of which is to be held on Wednesday next.

 

Sunday 3: At home. Mr Wm Bent came to dinner. In the afternoon Miss Willett & Mr Jos. Byerley.

 

Monday 4: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Began this day the works in old Linley Lane for supplying the house with water: the well which I had begun in the yard not promising a sufficient supply at any commodious depth.

 

Wednesday 6: At Newcastle. breakfasted at Mr Bents. Afterwards attending first meeting of the Agricultural Society. In the Chair Capt. Sneyd prevented from attending by intelligence which had been received of the death of his Brother Harry in Ireland. Respectable meeting. Resolutions &c unanimously adopted. Served with a Spa. [subpoena] to attend as a witness in the case of Heath v Halland by the latter.

 

Thursday 7: At home: Engaged with the workmen. Mr Boudarde in the evg. Mr Keys. very hot day.

 

Friday 8: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Mr Wood came but did not stay to dinner.

 

Sunday 10: Hassall & Mr Massey arrived soon after Breakfast. Much conversation with the former on various matters. Rochdale Canal Shares sell for £67

 

Monday 11: At home. Alcock. In the Evening rode out in the Gig with Eliza. Turned 12 Trout which the men had taken out of the brook at Alsager into the large pool. Hassall & Mr Massey went in the morning early.

 

Page 165

Tuesday 12: At home. Engaged all morning with Mr Holland Attorney relative to my attending at Stafford as a witness in the case of Heath agt. Holland when he thought my attendance might be dispensed with. In the afternoon served with a Spa. to attend as a witness in a Case Sr. Tho. Fletcher agt. Jackson & to provide Deeds. In the Evening took Eliza in the Gig to Newcastle. Attended Mr Heath Atty & delivered to him the Deed which he wished me to produce at the Assizes, & got excused attending.

 

Wednesday 13: At home. Engaged with the workmen. In the Eveng. rode out with Bessy in the Gig.

 

Thursday 14: Do. Do. very hot.

 

Friday 15: Do. "The average number of Ships employed in the Trade from Newcastle to London is 400, never less than 300, or more than 500. They make from nine to ten voyages in the year.

The price of a London Chaldron [A measure of coal - 36 bushels] of the best coals at Newcastle including the keel dues, lights, town dues, beer money and insurance at Newcastle was during the present year £13/7/4 alongside the Ship before put on board. The expense of loading included in the freight.

On the coals arriving at London, the Custom house expenses, . . .[Mutage] and Orphans duty, Kings duty, additional 5p. cart duty, discount & . . .[scorage] allowed the buyer. factors commission, petty expenses and interest on duties advanced, will amount to 11/6 per load on Chaldron.

The average number of Men and boys in each ship is in the proportion of one to twenty one tons. The wages of seamen in the coal trade is higher than in any other service, on account of the difficulty of the Navigation,  and its being confined to those bred up in the trade.

Wages which used before the war to be from £2: 10 in Summer & £3:3 in winter are now at the enormous rate of £11:11 for a single voyage. A London Chaldron of the best coals, so as to give a fair mercantile profit to all parties concerned, could not at this time (April 1) be sold in the London market for less than 48 per London Chaldron. In time of peace at not less than 37 during summer, and 3g during winter."

Gillespy's Evidence before the Committee of the House of Commons for examining into the coal trade.

Mr Gillespy is a Coal factor, Ship owner &c.

 

This afternoon the men laid the first retaining Stone on the Wheel race.

 

Page 166

Saturday 16: In the morning took Eliza in the Gig to Burslem. On our return the mare refusing to take the collar on beginning to ascend the Hill up to Talk, she ran back with the Carriage down a very considerable precipice. In attempting to jump out & seize her head, I was myself thrown down; and Eliza though taken down the precipice & the mare had compleatly(sic) turned over so that she lay with her head to the gig with the Shaft broke, most wonderfully escaped unhurt. To her own carlness(sic) [calmness] & presence of mind this must be in great measure attributed. On looking at the place in the Evening, I found that had the carriage gone down even a very few yards further, or short of the place where the accident happened there scarcely seemed a possibility that both of us might have been dashed to pieces. Fortunately a few bushes overhung at this spot, which by impeding the descent of the Carriage took the violence of the fall & gave Eliza time to disengage herself. In the evening Mr & Mrs T. Peake arrived.

 

Sunday 17: At home. Mr Wm Bent breakfasted & brought us the intelligence of the death of Mr John Willett, which happened about eleven o'clock the night before. Returned the Gig Mare to Mr Lander.

 

Monday 18: At home. Began cutting oats. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 19: Do. In the afternoon laid the first stone of the well or Reservoir in old Linley Lane for supplying the house with water.

 

Wednesday 20: At Newcastle attending the funeral of John Willett. Thunder & Lightening about noon with rain. Attended Turnpike Meeting at the Roebuck & returned home to dinner. Mr Wood Mr Hudson of London & Mr J. Wedgwood dined

 

Thursday 21: At home.

 

Friday 22: At Burslem with Mr & Mrs T Peake. Returned to dinner.

 

Page 167

Saturday 23: At Newcastle breakfasting with Mr Wm Bent from thence to Bullerton & returned home to dinner. In the evening very unwell.

 

 

Sunday 24: At home. Still very unwell.

 

Monday 25: Do. Mr Skerrett. Do. Alcock. Early in the morning a more serious attack of my old nervous complaint.

 

Tuesday 26: Do. Mr Harding & Mr Beckett relative to the Houses on the Marsh, Acct &c. Memdn. They appointed to come to Linley on Tuesday the 7th Oct & dine for the purpose of closing the Account. In the Afternoon Mr R Skerrett & Mr Wm Bent.

 

Wednesday 27: Do. Still unwell.

 

Thursday 28: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr & Mrs Peake & Eliza & Bessy at Newcastle but returned to dinner.

 

Friday 29: Do. In a conversation with Peake on the subject of Hadfield's Trial for the attempt to assassinate the King, he mentioned to me, on the authority of Serjt. Best one of the counsel for the prisoner from who he had it, that the prisoners Brief were delivered and the fees paid by Government. To what reflections does not such a circumstance as this lead, on the purity & excellence of the administration of Justice in this country? and the candour and mildness of its Government. Busy carrying oats.

 

Saturday 30: Mr Caskine said he could not stand the glance by Mr Pitt's eye in the House of Commons. At home.

 

Sunday 31: Do.

 

[September 1800]

 

September, Monday 1: Do: Alcock did not come. The person who tithed for Mr Tollett said that on an average through his district the wheat yielded this year 15 Thrave per acre, A Thrave is generally estimated at a Bushel & a half. The medium crop of wheat in Staffordshire was estimated by the person who attended to give information in consequence of the application made by Governmt. in the year 1795, at 18 or 20 bushels (Staffordshire measure of 38 quarts to the bushel) per acre. The average reported to Government was only 18 bushels per acre. Finished carrying oats. In the Eveng. Eliza Mrs Peake Bessy & Lissy went to the play at Newcastle.

 

Page 168

Tuesday 2: At home. Began cutting wheat.

 

Wednesday 3: Do. Mr Wood. In the evening very heavy rain.

 

Thursday 4: Do. Mr Boudarde. Hannah &c. arrived from their Journey into the North. In the evening Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 5: Ann & Bessy with Mr & Mrs Peake set off to Nantwich. The latter on their Journey into North Wales. Wet evening.

 

Saturday 6: At home. In the afternoon Mr Wm Bent.

 

Sunday 7: Do. 

 

Monday 8: At Burslem. Alcock. In the afternoon very heavy rain.

 

Tuesday 9: At home. Rain with thunder.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Sold two cows to Mr Twemlow for £26. In the afternoon cut wheat.

 

Thursday 11: Do. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 12: At Newcastle.

 

Saturday 13: At home. Blunt came to dinner.

 

Sunday 14: At home. Mr Jackson of Nantwich came to dinner.

 

Monday 15: Mr Jackson left Linley. At Newcastle Fair. Undertook reference between Mr Swinnerton, Barlow & others relative to Delph house. Acct. Colliery &c. Appointed Meeting of Committee of Agricultural Society for Wednesday 23rd inst at the Roebuck. Returned home to dinner. In the Evng. Mr & Mrs Peake arrived.

 

Tuesday 16: At home. carrying wheat. Began strawberry digging in the Garden at the farm.

 

Wednesday 17: Do. Finished carrying wheat.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr Wood relative to the proceedings of the Potters respecting the proposals made by the Weaver Company for carrying by that River. In the afternoon acted as Chairman of a Meeting held at Hanley.

 

friday 19: At home.

 

Saturday 20: At Burslem. Mrs Peake, Eliza &c went to Trentham.

 

Sunday 21: Do. In the afternoon Miss Willett.

 

Page 169

Monday 22: At home. wet stormy day. Riot commenced in the pottery on acct. of high price of Corn.

 

Tuesday 23: At home. Alcock. In the afternoon the Rioters came to Lawton & from thence to Rode Hill but committed no great violence.

 

Wednesday 24: At Newcastle to have attended Agricultural Committee Meeting but owing to the Riots in the Neighbourhood which engaged many of the Committee who were of the Cavalry the same was adjourned to Friday the 3rd Oct.

Went from Newcastle to Longport where the Rioters were expected to be & from thence to Burslem & afterwards accompanied by Capn. Sneyd & Mr Sparrow to Hanley when the Rioters were assembled in so great force that the Cavalry & the troops of 17 Light Dragoons has been called out. Staid at Hanley til about six o'clock & in the meantime had gone amongst the Mob & prevailed upon some to go quietly home.

 

Thursday 25: At Newcastle attending the funeral of Mrs Gaston. Mr Sneyd of Belmont had arrived on acct. of the Riots & went with the Cavalry & Lewarth Volunteers into the Pottery. Dined at the Roebuck with Rev. W. . . . &c

 

Friday 26: At home. In the evening engaged with Mr Edwd. Eardley relative to the reference made to me of dissents respecting the Delph house Colliery by Mr Swinnerton. Mr & Mrs Barlow & others. Received notice from Mrs Johnson to quit at Lady day next.

 

Page 170

[Transcribers note: The entries below refer to an absence of 3 weeks but there are no entries between Sept 25th and Oct 29th. JC clearly very unwell during this period.]

Wednesday 29: Returned from Buxton after an absence of 3 weeks. Better but far from well. Found Mr Wood relative to taking a Lease of the Grange Estate which we determined to do.

 

Thursday 30: At home. Mr Fritch

 

Friday 31: Do. In the morning coursed for an hour with Mr Chas. Lawton.

 

[November 1800]

 

Saturday 1: At Newcastle in Palins Banktcy. &c.

 

Sunday 2: At home. In the morning Mr Wm Bent.

 

Monday 3: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 4: Do.

 

Wednesday 5: Do.

"The immediate cause of Springs consists in the condensation of the atmospheric moisture, during the night principally: by the greater coldness of the Summits of hills. The water thus condensed in the Summits of hills descends between the strata of the incumbent soil, sometimes for many miles together; but generally from the nearest eminences into the adjoining vallies."

Darwins Phytologia p. 259

The best method of preventing the vallies from being too moist must be by cutting a long horizontal ditch into the side of the mountain to intercept the water just before the level land of the Valley commences: and thus to carry it away.       Ibid p. 261

For the various modes of accomplishing this vid. the same Book.

 

November. Friday 22: From the time of making the last Entry I have been almost wholly employed at home in superintending the workmen at the wheel &c for supplying the House with water. On the 19th inst. it was brought opposite to the front of the House & this day to the Gates of the Stable

 

Page 171

Yard. I went in the morning to Newcastle (with Eliza & Hannah) on various matters of business, & dined at Mrs Willetts. Mr McNivin of Lancashire, who I met with at Mr Wm Bents, & who is a Constructor with Government for the supply of the Barracks at Manchester, informed me that the allowance for the Dragoon horses is 12lbs weight per day of hay & 7 lbs of oats.

Gives his cows a little Hay, or good oatstraw chopped, then after Turnips, & sups[?tops] up with grains about a peck. This attention (if the word may be used) more advantageous than any one species of food.

 

Saturday 22(sic): Mr Blunt & Mr Vale came to dinner. In the morning finished . . .[had doing] Potatoes. Lissy  returned from Nantwich. Water carried on to the corner of the stable, by which means the house will from henceforth be supplied by the wheel.

 

Sunday 23: Ay home. Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 24: Do. Rain & snow. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 25: Much snow.

 

Wednesday 26: At Newcastle attending Meeting of the Commrs. of the Talk & Lewarth Turnpike Road when order made for completing the new branch. Subscribed £50. Dined at Mr Bents. violent storm of snow at night.

 

Thursday 27: At home. Mr Boudarde. Mr Fritch.

[Bottom of page left blank]

 

Page 172

 

[December 1800]

 

December, Monday 1: At home. began draining the bank before the house. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 2: At home.

 

Wednesday 3: Planted the Trees from the Yew Tree along the bottom of the Ground to the new foot road. Dined at Millsay at Talk in the hill the agriculture meeting.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Mr Adams relative to his business with Mr Sparrow & dined.

 

Friday 5: Began the Reservoir for the water at the top of the Back Yard.

 

Saturday 6: At Newcastle

 

Sunday 7: At home.

 

Monday 8: Do.

 

Tuesday 9: Do.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Mr Maris of Baltimore & Mr Wood. Alcock

 

Thursday 11: Do. engaged with Do. Mr Fritch

 

Friday 12: Mr Maris & Mr Wood left us. At Newcastle attending a meeting relative to the boarding school buildings.

 

Saturday 13: At home. Mr Wilbrahim called.

 

Sunday 14: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 15: At home. Engaged with the workmen

 

Tuesday 16: Do. Do. Began altering the waste weir at the wheel

 

Wednesday 17: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Mr Boudarde. Mr R Skerrett

 

Friday 19: Do.

 

Saturday 20: At Newcastle on various matters. Finished the waste weir. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 21: Do.

 

Monday 22: At Burslem. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At home. In the house all day.

 

Wednesday 24: Do. Finished claying the Reservoir & began laying the stone at the bottom.

 

Page 173

[blank page]

 

Page 174

1801

January, Friday 9: Returned from Nantwich, after an absence of a fortnight spent with much festivity and enjoyment amongst our kind affectionate friends. Frances & Louisa left behind, & having been retained one day extraordinary ourselves owing to my having a severe cold.

 

Saturday 10: At home. Engaged amongst the workmen &c. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Sunday 11: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 12: Do. Mrs Penlington. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: At home.

 

Wednesday 14: Do. Mr Swinnerton of Ballerton relative to Ld. Kenyon & Mr Tomkinson &c. Delivered to Mr Swinnerton the various papers & Letters relative to his business. Began draining the old pit in the middle of the field before the house.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mr Boudarde. Engaged with the workmen.

 

Friday 16: Do. The water was this day brought into the Reservoir.

 

Saturday 17: Do. The Reservoir was this day finished; & began filling with water for use.

"It has already been hinted, but it is an observation so pregnant with salutary inference, that it may well bear a repetition under a different aspect, that few, if any, of the forms of Government which have had any permanency, and which could boast of the advantages of civil liberty, have ever, sprung from a set of theoretical rules or maxims, digested methodically by a single, or perhaps by a numerous body of the dogmatical legislators; but that they have in general assign from a long series of experiments, and practical observations, and acquired their consistency from the occasional  remedies applied to exigencies as they occurred in the course of progressive events. Thus have none of the politics of . . . by Solon, Lycurgus, the adventurous Cromwell, and the no less presumptuous regicides of our days, had any duration, or scarcely survived their original founders; nor have the admired systems of Plato, More, Harrington, and many other of the speculative theorists, who have laboured in this field of investigation (and some of them confessedly with much sagacity and wisdom) been ever reduced into useful practice. When on the other hand we contemplate the Roman Republic, and the British empire, and the gradual perfection each required through a series of years

 

Page 175

according as experience pointed out the remedies to be applied to defects, against which all abstract wisdom could not originally provide, we shall be equally struck with the contrast, and be compelled to acknowledge that a good political constitution, necessarily comprizing(sic) a multitude of remote and intricate combinations, is not the work of a day, or of one man, or set of men.

The Helvetic Confederacy is another instance of the progressive and at the same time, unpremeditated tendency towards perfection. The Swiss cannot boast of any Legislation. Resolutely bent on preserving the independence for which they had incessantly struggled from the very beginning of their existence, justice was the corner stone on which they erected their political fabric. Without any refined maxims, or complicated set of rules, they followed the bent of their honest hearts; and by the gradual improvements of more than three centuries, at length completed a constitution, which while it afforded much matter censure to acute theorists, was productive of the happiest consequences, in securing the lives and prosperities of individuals, and the honour and prosperity of the nation at large."

Planta's History of the Helvetic Confederacy.

Quarto Vol 2d. p. 246

An intelligent and well informed writer (vid. Dict. de la Suisse) says "Thus the union of the Helvetic States depends far more upon the rude combination of the internal parts, and the nature and fortunate situation of their country, than upon nice estimates of their proportionate equilibrium or an elaborate system of political theorems."

Ibid. p. 248

 

No event in history will perhaps ever afford so much matter for speculation to moral, as well as political theorists, as the tremendous revolution, which has of late been spreading horror and devastation over the fairest part of Europe. The investigation of its origin and progress, whenever it can be entered into with the ample stock of materials, in which we shall yet a while be deficient, will be attended with the greater difficulty, as no former conflict of a similar nature had ever probably called forth so many energies and virtues, or let loose such a variety of vices and destructive passions, as the conclusion we are doomed to witness. While a few attentive observers have laboured with abundance of ingenuity, to trace the whole cause of the evil up to the pernicious efforts of a few miscreants, endowed with great genius, courage and perseverance, but with ambivalence which could only be gratified by the miseries insufferable from anarchy and sedition; others have

 

Page 176

derived the calamity from the great change introduced within this century into the state of society, by the rapid influx of wealth from both the Indies, which falling chiefly to the lot of the industrious, raised the lower classes nearer to a level with the superior orders; and by the improved cultivation of the mind, which insensibly produced a spirit of enquiry, and a presumptuous arrogance, that gradually led men to overrate the powers of reason, and unfitted them for the subordination, without which no government can possibly subsist. Many also have not scruples to decide that a thorough change in the polity[civil government] of Europe had become unavoidable through the many glaring defects in most of the existing governments rendered still more insupportable by the incapacity and maladministration of those to whom the direction of affairs had been committed.

[Transcribers note: It is not clear how the following two lines go together since there are no visible omission marks. They are written very close together and I have transcribed them as laid out.]

                     noting the puerile ambition & love of innovation of the Emperor, the irreligion of 

Frederic, the wanton diluter of all principle in Catherine, & the . . . injustice of the . . .[predition] of

 

After a relaxation had probably taken place in Poland & observing that from these circumstances the ties of reverance & loyalty which ought at all times to bind the people by their sovereign, and a political indifference which gave free scope to the disorganizers(sic) of our days, who were too keen and industrious not to avail themselves of the encouragement so profusely held out to them he proceeds.

In France the means of resistance were still more feeble than in other parts of the Continent, and here, accordingly, the seeds of sedition first broke out into open insurrection. that country had patiently supported two long reigns of depravity and enormous profusion, which had so . . . its finances that the benevolent Monarch who succeeded, unwillingly to recur to the despotic means used by his two predecessors, loosened the reigns of his government by demanding voluntary supplies, which his people would still have cheerfully granted, had not various concomitant circumstances damped their loyalty, and alienated the ardent zeal for the glory of their monarchs, for which that nation had so long been eminently distinguished. Those to whom the administration of public affairs had been consigned were, for the most part, men dissolute of the skill and vigour which the dangers of the times imperiously demanded. The glaring instances of depravity, moreover, not only winked at by the government, but even countenanced by the examples of those of higher ranks, and in the conspicuous situations, had long since offended and alarmed even the well disposed part of the nation, and greatly favoured the spirit of insubordination which gradually burst forth in all quarters. To this spirit the improvident . . .[Virgennes] gave additional vigour by his most impolitic American War, which while it countenanced an open resistance to the established authorities, greatly increased the spreading evil by additional derangement of the finances.

 

Page 177

All this, too, happened at a time when the popularity of the Sovereign was greatly impaired by his frequent dissensions with his parliament whom the people had accustomed themselves to look upon as their steady advocates, and whom repeated successes had taught to aim at further triumphs. Designing men were not wanting, who eagerly embraced the opportunity of accelerating the disturbances which they saw were now impending, and from which they had no doubt of drawing essential advantages. Aware that in order to arrive at their ends they must subvert the present system of society, they resolved to rouse the lower classes by the fascinating cry of Liberty and Equality, which they well knew no labourer, no journeyman, no vagrant of idle propensities and vicious habits would be disposed to suppress, and by a specious tender of a representation in the government, which men even of superior rank will be inclined to favour, deeming it much more eligible to have an ostensible share in the administration of public affairs, than to adhere to the peaceful enjoyment of domestic comforts and the improvement of their private fortunes by the honest arts of industry and economy.

Ibid. pp. 370 et seq.

 

Sunday 18: At home. Service &c. as usual

Men desire to have some share in the management of public affairs, chiefly on account of the importance which it gives them.

Smiths Wealth of Natures

Quarto. 2 Vol. p. 232.

 

Monday 19: At home. Alcock. In the evening Mr Fritch who came to spend a few days.

 

Tuesday 20: At home. engaged with Mr Fritch & his friend Lieut. Cope who came in the morning & staid to dinner.

 

Wednesday 21: I this day entered the 43rd. year of my age. Messrs. Hollin's, Alcock Cope Fritch of Bugnall dined, & in the evening we had some Musick.

 

Thursday 22: The weather being very stormy Mr Hollins with Alcock & Fritch staid to dinner but left us in the afternoon.

 

Friday 23: Early this morning a Messenger arrived from Nantwich with an account of the illness of our two dear little Girls Louisa & Frances in consequence of which Eliza Hannah & I immediately set off, and on our arrival found them in so alarming a state, as to induce me to send for Mr Bent. Their complaint a putrid sore throat with fever.

 

Page 178

Saturday 24: Mr Bent arrived early at Nantwich and found our dear little girls in an alarming & doubtful state. In the afternoon Hannah & I returned to Linley on account of the other Children, to whom Mr Bent had recommended the use of Bark, by way of precaution.

 

Sunday 25: At home.

 

Monday 26: Went again to Nantwich found our dear Louisa much better but my sweet Fanny extremely ill.

 

Tuesday 27: returned home.                    

                                                                

Wednesday 28: At home.

 

Thursday 29: Went again to Nantwich

[Transcribers note. The entries for 26th - 28th are bracketed together with the following entry across all three entries]

Miserable alternation of hope & fear for the state of my sweet Fanny: but my Louisa safe.

 

Friday 30: Mr Bent came again to Nantwich & gave us good hopes of the recovery of our darling little girl.

 

Saturday 31: Returned home from Nantwich

 

[February 1801]

 

February. Sunday 1: At home. Mr Bent dined. In the afternoon recd. a favourable account from Nantwich. In the evening attacked with sore throat & fever.

 

Monday 2: The greatest part of the day in bed having passed a miserable night. Miss Stamford went to Nantwich.

 

Tuesday 3: Do. but in the afternoon something better. Eliza & Bessy came with Miss Stamford, but returned in the Evening. Better . . .  . . . of my dear little girl. Received a Letter from Mr Fenton informing me of my having been unanimously approved at an Assembly of the Corporation of Newcastle for their Recorder in the room of Mr Tollett & requesting me to take upon myself the Office. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 4: Mr Bent came in the forenoon & staid to dinner. Sent a Letter by him to Mr Fenton intimating my willingness to take the Office of Recorder. Account from Nantwich of the advance though slow of my beloved Fanny. Sore throat better.

 

Thursday 5: Better. Walked out in the middle of the day. Good Account from Nantwich. Mr Rubotham & Mr Lander relative to the reference which had been made to me of the matter of Rubotham agt. Rogers for breach of promise of Marriage. In the evening Mr Fritch.

 

Page 179

Friday 6: At home. Mr R Skerrett dined. Not out of Doors - good Account by Wm Dale from Nantwich.

 

Saturday 7: At home. Better.

 

Sunday 8: In the morning read the Service as usual, and after dinner went to Nantwich, where I had the unspeakable delight to find my more than ever beloved & darling girl still better in as promising a way as we could reasonably wish or expect.

 

Monday 9: Our dear little girl so much better this morning that Eliza (who was very desirous to see the Children at home) & I returned to Linley after a peculiarly tender parting with our dear Frances. Never will be erased from my Remembrance the sweet & pretty manner in which she repeatedly raised herself up to kiss me. Ann engaged to write in the succeeding day a particular account.

 

Tuesday 10: At Newcastle attending general Meeting of the Agricultural Society. Dined at the Roebuck & slept at Mr Bents.

 

Wednesday 11: Returned home, and received in the evening from Ann the heart gratifying intelligence that our dear Fanny was recovering so fast as could possibly be expected or desired, and for the first time since her seizure indulged myself in the fond & certain assurance of her perfect safety.

 

Thursday 12: At home but not very well.

 

Friday 13: About eleven o'clock this morning a Messenger arrived from Nantwich with a letter from Ann informing us that a change for the worse had taken place in our darling child, on which we immediately set off, after despatching a Messenger to Bassford with the account & symptoms.

 

Saturday 14: Between five & six o'clock this morning terminated all our hopes & all our fears: and I felt for the first time what it is to lose a child.

 

Page 180

Sunday 1:

[no entry]

 

Sunday 15:

[no entry]

 

Page 181

 

[March 1801]

 

March, Sunday 1: Mr Bent breakfasted. The slough separated from my leg but still unable to go out of Doors.

 

Monday 2: Still confined with my leg. Alcock. staid all night.

 

Tuesday 3: Went out for the first time.

 

Wednesday 4: Went out again, but my leg rather worse. Mr Wilbrahim. Mr Jno. Garnett dined. Informed me that he had given 8½ pr. lb for Cheese the Dairy through. Edwards's of Alsager.

 

Thursday 5: Mr Boudarde. Fine day. Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 6: Confined all day. In the afternoon Mrs Skerrett with Ann & Bessy arrived. Rainy & cold.

 

Saturday 7: Still confined with my leg. Mr Skerrett arrived. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 8: Do. 

 

Monday 9: Alcock. Engaged all day with our friends.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Do. Mr Skerrett went to Nantwich.

 

Wednesday 11: Engaged with our friends. &c.

 

Thursday 12: Mr Boudarde. Mr Skerrett returned

 

Friday 13: Engaged with our friends

 

Saturday 14: Great snow. Engaged with Brookes the Carpenter relative to the additions proposed to be made to the House.

 

Sunday 15: Snow. Mr Wood dined.

 

Monday 16: The weather so bad that our friends prevented from returning today as they had intended. At Newcastle in consequence of the illness of Mrs Bent who had been entirely given up by Mr Bent & Dr. Campbell, but I found her today out of danger in consequence of having the night before parted with a Gallstone which was measured by Mr W. Bent in the presence of myself & his Brother & the dimensions of which were 4¼ inches in circumference one way & 3½ inches the other. An astonishing fact which I therefore mention thus particularly.

 

Page 182

Tuesday 17: At home. Our friends left us this morning but the day proved very wet & bad.

 

Wednesday 18: Do.

 

Thursday 19: Mr Johnson of Daisy Bank & Mr T Sparrow dined by appointment for the purpose of a conversation on the subject of the Customs of the Manor of Audley, & the new claims set up by Sr. Tho. Fletcher, the Lord. Blunt came with Mr S. Mr Johnson staid all night.

 

Friday 20: Mr Johnson left us though the morning very wet & stormy, having first looked over a good deal of the Farm & particularly the draining in various parts.

 

Saturday 21: Dined at Newcastle at Mr W Bents with Miss Hollins Blunt & Joseph Adams relative to Newcastle races &c. & appointed to accompany Mr B. to Manchester on Wednesday next on a visit to Mr Jno. Hardman & for the completion of the Brewery Title &c.

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 24: At Newcastle with Eliza & Miss Stamford. Settled finally Hollins &c. Arbitration with Mr Hassells. Brewery. From Newcastle to Etruria & Burslem. dined at Mr Woods. In the evening Bent arrived.

 

Wednesday 25: Set off for Manchester, & got to Somerville to dinner. Mr Hardman &c met us.

 

Thursday 26: Dined at Mr Wm Hardmans with a party of friends. Engaged all morning in taking a survey of the Salford Brewery & afterwards in viewing the fine Pictures of Mr Tho. Burns & Mr Wm Hardman. Called at the two Atkinsons.

 

Friday 27: Went to Manchester again. Called at Miss Hardmans in Moseley Street & Dr. Percivals. Returned to Somerville to dinner. Mr Sharpe the Atty arrived. A sensible & candid young man.

 

Saturday 28: Returned home & arrived in the Evening after a very agreeable & useful excursion having settled the Brewery business to our perfect satisfaction.

 

Page 183

Sunday 29: At home.

 

Monday 30: Do. Engaged all day on the farm. Set early potatoes on the slope behind the house & busy sowing Oats. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 31: At home. Engaged on the farm. Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood called.

 

[April 1801]

 

April, Wednesday 1: At home. Do.

 

Thursday 2: Do. Mr Boudarde

 

Friday 3: Do. Miss Wedgwood & Miss Willett dined.

 

Saturday 4: Do.

 

Sunday 5: Do.

 

Monday 6: At Newcastle fair. dined at Mr Adams's with Capn. Sneyd. relative to Newcastle Races &c. Bought 4 pigs cost 3:12. [No units given]

 

Tuesday 7: At home. Set early potatoes before the house. Hannah & Lissy set off for Manchester.

 

Wednesday 8: Do.

 

Thursday 9: At Burslem. Mr Boudarde. Mr & Miss Bent of Besford called in my absence.

 

Friday 10: At home. Mr Wood, Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Saturday 11: Do.

 

Sunday 12: Do.

 

Monday 13: Do. Engaged on the Farm &c.

 

Tuesday 14: At Betley calling on Mrs Tollett but Mr Tollett had gone away the day before. Called at Sr. Thos. Fletchers. Miss S & Eliza returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Sr. Thos. & Lady Fletcher made a long call, some conversation with Sr .Thos. relative to the Customs & Times within the Manor of Audley.

 

Thursday 16: At Newcastle. Engaged at the Brewery & appointed to accompany T. Sparrow to the Genl. Assembly at Stone on Tuesday next & to attend the Mayor & Corporation of Newcastle on Wednesday at their Sessions in order to take the oaths &c as Recorder. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 17: At home.

 

Page 184

[Transcribers note. The numbers ascribed to the days by JC are as written but are in fact one day out. Saturday should be the 18th.]

Saturday 19: Dined at Sr. Thos. Fletchers with Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood Miss W. & Mr & Mrs Broughton

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: Engaged all morning at Alsager looking over Taxes to be taken for the intended new Buildings at Linley Wood. Alcock

[Transcribers note. This is the first time JC has referred to the house as Linley Wood within the body of the diary. The only other time the name has been given in full is when the house was bought in 1794, ref. p. 110]

 

Tuesday 22: At Stone attending General Assembly of the Navigation.

 

Wednesday 23: At Newcastle attending the Sessions & qualifying for the Office of Recorder to which I had been unanimously elected. Dined with the Mayor & Justices &c at the Roebuck & slept at Sparrows.

 

Thursday 24: Returned home to dinner.

 

Friday 25: Sr. Thos. Lady & W. Fletcher with Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood. Mrs Wedgwood & Miss Wedgwood dined.

 

Saturday 26: At Newcastle dined at Admiral Child's.

 

Sunday 27: Dined at Capt. Sneyds relative to appointing persons to receive the agricultural Claims.

 

Monday 28: At home.

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Mr Skerrett came relative to the intended new Building. Alcock.

 

Wednesday 30: Engaged all morning at Alsager with Mr Skerrett looking over Timber.

 

[May 1801]

 

May, Thursday 1: Mr Skerrett returned. At Newcastle engaged all day settling the Brewery Books for the last half year. staid all night. Miss Fletcher at Linley.

 

Friday 2: Returned home to dinner after a Meeting relative to Newcastle Races. In the afternoon Dr. Mrs & Miss Crompton arrived.

 

Saturday 3: Called at Rodehall but Mr Wilbrahim from home.

 

Sunday 4: Mr Jos. Wedgwood called.

 

Page 185

Monday 5: At home. Weather remarkably dry. Dr Crompton & Edwd. left Linley. Alcock.

[written in the RH margin alongside the following] Vid. Walkers Sermon on the right of individual judgement. Preached at Chewbent 25th June 1800.

The right of individual judgement in matters of religion, is a principle of immutable stability, and on which religion's liberty must rest. At the same time it must be confessed that the cause of liberality is often most illiberally defended; and that many who contend most strenuously for this right, measure the exercise of it by their own opinions. To the Churchman as well as to the Dissenter, for instance, the right equally appertains; and yet any degree of external conformity unaccompanied by conscientious correction has been sincerely reprobated, and from thence the enlargement of the Dissentient Church warmly argued. But it may be asked and fairly asked too, does not the very principle itself, give to every Man the right of determining how far his disapprobation of parts of an established creed, ought to operate in making him hostile to the whole, and require him to become an avowed and active Dissenter? That Man is not only justified but bound to separate, who feels that conscience and by fair investigation dictate it; but may not another person equally influenced by conscience and the fair result of his injuries, as well as actuated by a love of peace & harmony, deem it to be no less his duty to abide by the established system, as far as outward appearance extends, while it is in his opinion sufficient for the purpose of virtue and piety, though his approbation of it be not unqualified and complete. Instances are not wanting of men of very discriminating understandings who although they perceived errors in the public ritual, preferred their own selection in rehearsing the common prayer, to the abandonment of themselves to the extemporaneous devotion, which is common in dissenting characters. And as it is vain to look for, or expect a public service, which shall throughout exactly correspond with the statements and feelings of each individual and one unpleasant

 

Page 186

auditor. Men without intending to be either hypocritical or insincere may think, that by writing themselves to any hostile Church, they shall not attain to a perfect satisfaction of mind, but only exchange one difficulty and one unpleasant circumstance for others.

Vid. Monthly Review for March 1801 p. 334 for the greater part of the above Observations.

 

Tuesday 6: Mr & Mrs Turner & Miss Willett dined.

 

Wednesday 7: Mrs & Miss Crompton left Linley. Dined at Etruria with Mr & Mrs Turner Mrs & Miss Willett.

 

Thursday 8: At Burslem. Boudarde.

 

Friday 9: At home. Ann & Bessy arrived from Nantwich, having been fetched by Miss Stamford.

 

Saturday 10: Mr & Mrs Turner & Miss Willett dined & staid all night.

 

Sunday 11: Mr Turner performed the Service. Returned in the Evg. 

 

Monday 12: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: Miss Stamford Bessy & Mary set out to London. Mrs Blunt arrived & Ann returned in the Chaise to Newcastle.

 

Wednesday 14: Dined at Newcastle at Mr Wm Bents with Mr & Mrs Wright of Liverpool & Mr Mrs & Miss Bent of Batsford.

 

Thursday 15: Mr Blunt & Stamford & Mr Turner dined & staid all night.

 

Friday 16: At home. Mr Blunt & Mr Turner returned to Newcastle

 

Saturday 17: At home

3 Roods of Land (eight square yards to the Rood) with five pecks of potatoes for seed if well managed will produce 15 bushels or 1200 pounds. 30 weeks at 40 pounds a week.

 

Sunday 18: At home. Fine showers

 

Monday 19: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 20: Eliza took Mrs Blunt to Newcastle. Mr & Mrs Wood & family came to spend a few days. Mr Penlington dined.

 

Page 187

Wednesday 21: At home engaged with Mr Woods &c.

 

Thursday 22: Do: Boudarde. I this day broke the ground for the new stables: & the digging for the foundations was begun.

 

Friday 23: At home. Engaged with the Woods

 

Saturday 24: Mr & Mrs Woods & family left us. In the Evening Mr & Mrs Wm Bent arrived.

 

[Note. dates are correct from now on - see page 184]

Sunday 24: Mr Cox breakfasted relative to Mr Chantins business with Mr Skerrett.  Mr S came about 10. Mr Wood to dinner. Mr S Mr Wood & Mr W Bent went in the course of the afternoon.

 

Monday 25: Mrs W. B returned. At Newcastle fair. Dined at W. B.

 

Tuesday 26: Eliza & Lissy went to Newcastle. Engaged about the farm.

 

Wednesday 27: At home. Engaged with the workmen at the new stables & in the farmyard raising the pavement in order to . . .[find] the water higher.

 

Thursday 28: At Newcastle attending Meeting as a Commr. for final Divd. in Danl. Morris's Banktcy

 

Friday 29: At home. engaged with workmen

 

Saturday 30: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 31: Do.

 

[June 1801]

 

June, Monday 1: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 2: Do.

 

Wednesday 3: Dined at Talk on the Hill. Agriculture Meeting. Mr Skerrett.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Boudarde. Fritch

 

Friday 5: At Newcastle, from thence to Etruria calling upon Mr Wedgwood. Dined at Burslem & drank tea at Mr T Wedgwoods.

 

Saturday 6: At home.

 

Sunday 7: Do.

 

Page 188

Monday 8: At home. The anniversary of the happy day which seventeen years ago united me to the best of friends & the most amicable of women; & my respect & esteem for whom can be equalled only by the tenderness of the passion which is so far from having abated seems every day to glow with increasing ardour. With such a tonic of Recollections as mine, how indeed could all this be otherwise?

 

Tuesday 9: Do. The stone masons who had not come to work the last week owing to their being engaged at Trentham returned, & the stables were set about with vigour.

 

Wednesday 10: Engaged with the workmen. In the forenoon at Newcastle on various matters

 

Thursday 11: At home engaged with the workmen. Boudarde.

 

Friday 12: Eliza & I dined at Newcastle at Mr Wm Bents with Mr & Mrs James Hardman, who in the evening returned with us to Linley.

 

Saturday 13: Mr & Mrs Hardman left us on their return home.

 

Sunday 14: At home

 

Monday 15: Do. Engaged with the workmen

 

Tuesday 16: Do. Messrs. Sneyd, Sparrow, Hollins, Adams, Fenton, Poole & Wallhall dined.

 

Wednesday 17: At home.

 

Thursday 18: Mr Wood dined. Boudarde. In the evening went to Nantwich to attend the funeral of Miss Skerrett.

 

Friday 19: After the funeral dined at Mr Skerretts & in the evening returned home.

 

Saturday 20: Mr. Blunt & John dined & staid all night.

 

Sunday 21: At home.

 

Monday 22: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At Burslem. In the evening Hannah & Mary with Bessy returned from London.

 

Page 189

Wednesday 24: At home. Mr Skerrett came to dinner. Engaged with the workmen. Eliza &c called at Etruria.

 

Thursday 25: Stamford laid the first stone of the new wing to the house. In the afternoon cut down the large Scotch fir in the front, owing to its beginning to die at the top & decay.

 

Friday 26: Dined at the Boot at Talk on the Hill where I gave a dinner to about twenty of the farmers & neighbours who had assisted me in carrying gravel for the new Road & Sand . . . &c for the new Buildings.

 

Saturday 27: At home in the Morning. In the afternoon went to Newcastle to attend the entrance of the Horse. Their being little expectation of discussion the first matched the little bay horse to run against Mr Tho. Fentons gy. mare.

 

Sunday 28: Dined at Mr Sparrows at Newcastle previous to my attending the Mayor & Corporation to Church in the afternoon as Recorder, which I had the day before engaged to do. An excellent sermon from Blunt, on the inefficacy of Faith without works, which had he known of my attendance I should have thought applicable to the occasion.  In the evening called at Bradwall with Sparrow & prevailed upon Captn. Sneyd to permit me to nominate him as one of the Stewards at the succeeding Races.

 

Monday 29: In the morning called at Rode Hall, but Mr Wilbrahim not returned. Alcock. In the afternoon very unwell.

 

Tuesday 30: So unwell as to be in bed the greatest part of the day; but in the Evening better. Boudarde.

 

[July 1801]

 

[Headed June by JC but actually July]

June. Wednesday 1: At Newcastle Hannah, Eliza Lissy & myself at Mr Bents. Dined at the Ordinary as Steward. Very full attendance from the Match. In the evening the largest attendance at the Ball that had been known at Newcastle. Everything went off well.

 

Page 190

Thursday 2: Full ordinary again at the Shakespeare; and a most crowded house at the Play.

 

Friday 3: Returned home by Burslem. Gratified as I could not but be, by the marks of respect & attention which I had experienced during the two last days.

 

Saturday 4: At home engaged with the workmen &c.

 

Sunday 5: Do. Service &c. as usual. In the Evening Mrs Skerrett arrived on their annual visit.

 

Monday 6: At home. Much engaged with the workmen.

 

Tuesday 7: Do. Do. In the evening Mr Skerrett.

 

Wednesday 8: At home engaged with Mr Skerrett & the workmen.

 

Thursday 9: Do. Do. Boudarde

 

Friday 10: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 11: At Burslem with Mr Skerrett & Miss Stamford

 

Sunday 12: At home.

 

Monday 13: Do. Mr Skerrett & I engaged with the workmen. 

 

Tuesday 14: Do. Do. Mr Blunt came to dinner.

 

Wednesday 15: Do.

 

Thursday 16: Mr Yoxall Mr Thos. Yoxall Mr Adams & Mr & Mrs R Skerrett dined

 

Friday 17: At home. Blunt left us. Boudarde. In the evening Mr Skerrett left us.

 

Saturday 18: At home.

 

Sunday 19: Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 20: At home. Alcock. In the evening Mrs Skerrett left us. Began mowing the meadow.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. In the evening in running with Mary got a severe sprain in the thigh.

 

Page 191

Wednesday 22: Confined to the house in consequence of the accident

 

Thursday 23: Do. with much pain. Mr N & Miss Lawrences called.

 

Friday 24: Do.

Dr. Anderson observes on the subject of Quick lime as a Manure, that we are unacquainted with the mode in which lime operates as a Manure, but that contrary to the prevailing Theory he considers it amongst the enriching manures, instead of being a mere exciting manure, because it operates upon poor land, and had failed on Land impregnated with dung, & therefore exactly in the state in which the Theory supposes that lime should produce greatest effect.

He says, there is but one kind of calcareous matter, and that all the varieties of calcareous substances, such as Marl &c are entirely occasioned by a diversity in the nature of the extraneous bodies with which they are united.

That it is a mistaken idea, that lime in the end, renders land more steril(sic) than formerly.

Recommends to plough the lime in, instead of laying it upon the grass.

The best lime is that which swells very much in slaking, [combining with water] is light, fine to the touch, and of a pure white.

In case of an accident by which a horse or a man is scalded from working amongst lime, he recommends to wash well the part affected with verysour milk or whey; which will destroy the poignancy of the lime. The sourer the milk or whey the better. For want of this vinegar, or stale wine, but the milk or whey the best remedy.

 

Saturday 25: Still confined with much pain.

 

Sunday 26: Do. Captn Sneyd & Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 27: Do. Alcock. Thos Walls came as Butler & Postman 21 Gs per annum. Finished the Hay Harvest in the meadows. Got without rain

 

Tuesday 28: Do. In the afternoon Mr Gilbert called & Mr Bent

 

Wednesday 29: Do. Mr Gilbert dined.

 

Thursday 30: Do: But the symptoms began to abate. Mrs John Wedgwood & Mrs Fearn dined. Boudarde.

 

Page 192

[Page heading] July

Friday 31: Still confined.

 

[August 1801]

 

August, Saturday 1: Do.

 

Sunday 2: Do.

 

Monday 3: Walked out. Nearly finished the Hay Harvest.

 

Tuesday 4: Do.

 

Wednesday 5: Rode out in the afternoon & saw Mr & Mrs Wm Hardman at Talk.

 

Thursday 6: Not so well. Boudarde & in the Evening Mr Keys.

 

Friday 7: Set the Roof upon the additional building to the House

 

Saturday 8: At home. Finished with the Stone masons.

 

Sunday 9: Mr & Mrs Wm Bent came to dinner. In the afternoon Mr Wood.

 

Monday 10: Bent returned with Stamford leaving Mrs Bent at Linley. Alcock. Began cutting oats before the house.

 

Tuesday 11: Eliza & I took Mrs Bent home in the Carriage. The two eldest girls walked to Newcastle.  Attended general Meeting of Agricultural Society, returned home in the Evg.

 

Wednesday 12: At home. In the evg. Dr Crompton Ldr. & Henry arrived.

 

Thursday 13: Dr Crompton left us this morning. Boudarde. Mr Wilbrahim called

 

Friday 14: Eliza & I with Lissy & Ann went to Burslem & from there to Longport calling upon Mrs Williamson & Mr Henshall & afterwards dined at Burslem.

 

Saturday 15: At home.

 

Sunday 16: At home.

 

Monday 17: Do. Alcock. In the evening called at Mr Gilberts to ask him to meet the two Mr Bents & Mr Watkiss to dinner in Wednesday. Found the riding on horseback still very incommodious from my hurt. Mr G not at home.

 

Page 193

Tuesday 18: At home.

 

Wednesday 19: Mr & Mrs Watkiss Mr & Miss Bent Mr & Mrs Wm Bent & Mr Gilbert dined Gave Mr Bent the following . . .[imperative] Statement of building with Stone or brick at Linley Wood

[Large section of page left blank]

 

Thursday 20: At home much engaged in the harvest. Boudarde. Mr Lawton sent a present of fruit,

 

Friday 21: At home. finished carrying the oats in the field before the house. In the evening Miss Stamford returned.

 

Saturday 22: Dined at Mr Gilberts with Mr Wittenhall, Watkiss & Wm Bent. Agreed to give Notice in order to prevent the depredation of Gamekeepers

 

Sunday 23: At home.

 

Monday 24: Do. In the morning Mr Skerrett arrived with whom

 

Page 194

engaged all day. Captn Sneyd called. In the evening carried wheat. A very fine & abundant crop. Carried till one oclock in the morning.

 

Tuesday 25: Engaged with Mr Skerrett &c. In the Afternoon Mrs Byerly &c. drank tea. very busy cutting oats.

 

Wednesday 26: Mr Skerrett returned early. Sr. Tho. Lady & Miss Fletcher called. Sr Tho. & I executed the Deeds in which I am named as a Trustee for Mr [?W] Fletcher. Mr Wood dined.

 

Thursday 27: At home. Boudarde.

 

Friday 28: Do. Engaged with the workmen & carrying oats. Mr Eardley relative to the reference made to me of the Cause of Roebotham v Rogers, when I appointed Thursday the 3rd Sep. for the purpose at the Swan Talk.

 

Saturday 29: At home. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale dined.

 

Sunday 30: Do.

 

Monday 31: Do. In the evening Mr Adams of Newcastle arrived on a shooting expedition.

 

[September 1801]

 

September, Tuesday 1: Went out with Mr Adams. Killed the first bird I shot at being a single one. Mr Adams returned in the afternoon having killed 3½ brace & a mallard. Mr Beckett Mr R Skerrett & Mr Adams dined.

 

Wednesday 2: Out again but without success. Adams killed only one bird & a leveret. Mr Adams returned in the evening.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Boudarde

 

Friday 4: Do. Mr & Mrs Broughton called.

 

Saturday 5: Eliza Hannah & Lissy went to Newcastle. Mr Beckett dined. Engaged all te afternoon with him in settling accounts relative to the . . . in the Marsh

 

Page 195

With regard to myself, I honestly confess, that I am sincerely attached to the present (Mr Pitts) administration, and that I take a decided part with it, not on account of any personal connexions(sic), for I have not the honour of being acquainted with any of the Members of it, but because a full investigation of the subject, has convinced me, that not the British Ministry, but the French Rulers alone, were the authors of the war.

Preface to Marshs Hist. of the Politics of G. B. & France.

 

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Page 199

 

[November 1801]

 

November, Wednesday 4: At home. Engaged settling accounts &c. Letters &c.

 

Thursday 5: Do. Gradually recovering.

 

Friday 6: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 7: Do. Do. Fever much abated.

 

Sunday 8: Do. Went through the service as usual. Mr Bent dined.

The late establishment of the Roman Catholic religion in France, which seems to me to be pregnant with greater consequences and to have originated in deeper political motives than may at first view be imagined, recalls to my mind the following observation upon it made by Robertson in his Hist. of Scotland by De Lolme on the Cons . . . of Eng.

"Popery is a species of false religion, remarkable for the strong impression it takes of the heart. Contrived by men of deep insight in the human character, and improved by the experience and observation of many successive ages, it arrived at last to a degree of perfection, which no former system of superstition had ever attained. There is no power in the understanding, and no passion in the heart, to which it does not present objects adapted to rouse and interest them."

Vol 1. p.349.

De Lolme says " - A Religion which repeated Acts of the Legislature had proscribed; and proscribed, not because it tended to establish in England the doctrines of transubstantiation and purgatory, doctrines in themselves of so political moment, but because the unlimited power of the Sovereign had always been made one of its principal tenets."

De Lolme p. 57.

What is the present state of France, and the wealth at this moment of all horrors & devastation occasioned by the Revolution? Liberty has already given place to military despotism, and the . . . overthrow of religious prejudices & the ancient system of Superstition.

 

Page 200

Monday 9: Remarkably fine mild day. Alcock. In the Evening the three Miss Hardmans arrived.

 

Tuesday 10: Engaged on the farm.

 

Wednesday 11: At home. Do. Stamford came home in consequence of the illness of Mrs Blunt.

 

Thursday 12: In the Morning at Burslem. Received the intelligence of the death of Mrs Blunt and on my return a Letter from Mr Blunt on the occasion. In the Eveng. Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 13: "Many sages and politicians have fondly extolled and strenuously recommended Representative Governments. Under these forms, it has been said, the governor sought only the good of the governed; while the latter in each exchange for subjection, shares in every comfort and in every blessing which endear and give value to existence. Recent experiences however, - that which the directional rule in a neighbouring country furnishes has not only ill corresponded with but has completely contradicted this Theory. While that

political regimen prevailed all authority was derived from Sufferage; and surely never was power entrusted to more unworthy or more incompetent hands. Had minions and mistresses appointed the occupiers of places of trust and influence, could they have been worse filled? In what age, or in what country, have rulers shown more want of dignity, greater propriety to abuse found, and more aptitude to betray their trusts, than were exhibited by these persons; whose misconduct had occasioned the French to embrace usurpation and military Tyranny as boons, to receive their yoke with pleasure, and to bless them who imposed it on them?

Appendix to the 35th Vol. of Monthly Review P. 477.

Those who are carions in observing the caprices of the human mind, and desirous of drawing practical influences, will find an ample fund in the events of the French Revolution which may teach.

 

Page 201

Friday 13: At home. Wet day.

 

Saturday 14: At Newcastle. spent the whole of the Forenoon with Blunt & returned to a late dinner.

 

Sunday 15: At home. Service as usual.

Mr Erskine in his Speech on the Convention with Russia, as supported in the Star of Saturday the 24th inst. was the following expressions.

"I know that the Country in which Providence had cast my lot, is the sphere of my duties; and therefore must be the chief object of my affections. We cannot embrace all alike. Our attachment must proceed from the near to the more distant objects. Like the circles made by the pebble in the water, our affections must expand in the same system. Here is the sphere of our duties; here, the dearest the immediate object of our regard and devotion. It is our own country that first demands our love, our cares, our wishes, our hopes. But if we can save the honour of other nations whilst we secure our own it is true magnanimity.

I was pleased with, and transcribe the passage as a good definition of real patriotism & rational philanthropy.

 

Monday 16: At home. Engaged all morning planting the ground in the stable yard &c. Alcock. In the evening Musick.

 

Tuesday 17: At Newcastle attending the Funeral of Mrs Blunt. Service performed by Mr John Fenton. Of this beautiful & deserving woman, I can truly say, that I never saw her do nor ever heard her say a thing, that offended my judgement or my feelings or that I wished undone or unsaid. She afforded a peculiar example of that propriety which without any striking perfection, desirous general excellence together with that necessary union of good sense & good disposition which forms what is not valuable respectable & amiable in female character.

 

Wednesday 18:At home engaged in planting &c. Mr Wood dined

 

Page 202

Thursday 19: At home. Boudarde.

 

Friday 20: At Newcastle. Engaged in the morning at the Brewery. Dined at Mr Hollins's with a Party & slept at Mr Bents.

 

Saturday 21: Returned to dinner. Miss Hardmans gone this morning. Mr Wilbrahim called. Roads, Packham Estate &c &c.

 

Sunday 22: At home. Service as usual.

 

Monday 23: Do. Engaged planting &c. Alcock. Joshua Rigby & family went from Linley,

 

Tuesday 24: Do. Do. receiving Mr Penlingtons Rents, Mr P. dined much discussion relative to his affairs &c.

 

Wednesday 25: Do. Engaged on the farm in various matters.

 

Thursday 26: Do. Mr Boudarde.

 

Friday 27: At Newcastle settling & adjusting the annual Accts. of the Brewery.

 

Saturday 28: Returned home in the afternoon having been busily engaged all the morning in the Counting House.

In the Committee of the House of Commons on the Distilleries & high price of Corn on Tuesday last (vid. Star) Mr Vansittart stated that it appeared to the Committee of that House appointed to enquire into the causes of the high price of provisions in 1799, that the crop of barley in Great Britain in a year of ordinary plenty, was five Millions of quarters out of which the consumption of the distilleries in no year exceeded 300,000 quarters or at most one twentieth part of the whole.

This fact is alone sufficient to show how little pretence the opening of the distilleries would afford for keeping up the price of Corn: and it should also be kept in mind that not less than 60,000 hogs are computed to be fed annually by the distilleries & brought into the market in rid of Butchers meat.

The public revenue is about £400,000 per annum.

 

Page 203

 

Sunday 29: At home. Engaged as usual.

 

Monday 30: Do. on the farm various occupations

The new Husbandry so often quoted by agricultural writers, without a definition, consists, "In allotting certain portions of an arable farm to the purpose of summer and winter feeding a stock of Cattle, sufficient, with their dung to manure and fertilize the whole of the land. In the eradicating as far as possible, all useless vegetation with the hoe. In the use of the various improved, or newly invented implements for the purpose of expediting or abridging labour, and in the judicious solution of domestic animals."

New Turners Calendar p. 160

Alcock who staid all night. In the Evening. Musick. 

 

[December 1801]

 

December, Tuesday 1: Do. Ploughing before the house. On this piece I have laid about four tons of lime to the acre, after a crop of Oats.

 

Wednesday 2: At home. Engaged all morning in private Accounts &c.

 

Thursday 3: Do. Do. In the arrangement of Letters, papers &c.

 

Friday 4: Do. Do. all day. In the evening began to read to the children short lectures in natural experimental Philosophy, or those laws by which the material universe in ground, most enables us to account for the various appearances in nature; and one of its most important uses is, in enabling us to apply these principles to many of the common concerns & operations of life, and thereby not only to explain, but perform them with greater ease and advantage.

 

Saturday 5: At home.

 

Sunday 6: Do.

 

Monday 7: Do. Engaged in arranging papers &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 8: Do. in the forenoon Mr Skerrett arrived

 

Wednesday 9: Do. Engaged all morning with Mr Skerrett on various matters particularly Mr Penlingtons affairs, perusing papers &c. &c. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

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Thursday 10: Engaged with Mr Skerrett, who this morning settled with Mr Dale for him to have the Alsager Estate in the Spring of 1803 & which he agreed to do. Mr Blunt came to dinner  & in the Evening Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 11: Mr Skerrett left us after breakfast. Called upon Mr Gilbert with various papers & Letters relative to the settlement of Mr Day Broughtons saltworks affairs with St. Thos Broughton, in which Mr B had consulted me and the proposed arbitration; & left all the papers Accounts &c. which I had received from Mr B. with Mr Gilbert.

 

Saturday 12: At home. Engaged about the farm.

 

Sunday 13: Do.

 

Monday 14: Do.

 

Tuesday 15: At Newcastle dining with Mr Thos. Sparrow. Extreme wet day.

 

Wednesday 16: At home. Engaged in settling various Accts. &c.

 

Thursday 17: Do. Boudarde.

 

Friday 18: At Burslem

 

Saturday 19: At Newcastle meeting Mr Wood relative to Mr Browes Coals &c. Brewery. Mr Sparrow relative to the Arbitration Roebotham & Rogers. Plant relative to the Reference to the Sheriff of the County & myself of Barlow & Swinnertons Cause in Chancery with various parties at . . .[Cheadh] respecting making Containers &c. Mr Wood returned with me to Linley to dinner. At night Tho. Wall & Th. Hill went off. Alarm from fire in the dining room.

 

Sunday 20: At home. In the evening very . . . I hear.

 

Monday 21: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: Do.

How silly and how dangerous is the error of considering the rejection of general opinion as a mark

 

Page 205

of superior understanding?

 

Wednesday 23: At home.

The following is a comparison between the average weight of Bullocks &c at it was 100 years ago and as it is as present. viz:

Bullocks              100 years ago          on average        370 lbs  now 800

Calves                        Do.                        Do.                 50 lbs          140

Sheep                         Do.                        Do.                 28 lbs            80

Lambs                        Do.                        Do.                 18 lbs            50

Notwithstanding this increase of size, the number of Beasts has increased in the proportion which appears from the following averages (containing nine years each) of the Cattle & Sheep sold in Smithfield Market from the year 1731 viz.559,891

1732 to 1740 inclusive       yearly average          Cattle 83,906  Sheep 564,650 

1741 to 1749  Do.                    Do.                                74,194              559,891

1750 to 1758  Do.                    Do.                                75,331              623,091

1759 to 1767  Do.                    Do.                                83,472              615,328

1768 to 1776  Do.                    Do.                                89,362              627,805 

1777 to 1785  Do.                    Do.                                99,285              687,588

1786 to 1794  Do.                    Do.                              101,075              707,456

The average of the last 7 years is understood to have exceeded any o f the former.

 

Thursday 24: At Newcastle on various matters, Boudarde.

 

Friday 25: At home.

 

Saturday 26: Do. Engaged on various papers.

 

Sunday 27: Do. Mr Barron dined.

 

Monday 28: Do. Engaged at the farm on various matters. Alcock

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Do. & Altering the plantation at the Turn into the Stable yard. Received from Peake his Compendium of the Law of Evidence.

 

Wednesday 30: Do. Perused a great deal of Peakes Book.

 

Thursday 31: Do. Boudarde.

 

 

 

 

 

Page 206 

1802

January

Friday 1: At home.

 

Saturday 2: Do.

 

Sunday 3: Do. Received from Mr Plant of Newcastle the papers in a Cause in Chancery  proposed to be referred to the Sherriff of the County & myself. Swinnerton & .[others] agt. Wright & ors.[others] respecting the Coal mines in the neighbourhood of Cheadle.

 

Monday 4: Do. Engaged perusing the above papers. Mr Blunt came to dinner. Alcock. In the evening good Musick.

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Mr Blunt went to Newcastle but returned to dinner. Much conversation relative to Stamford &c. &c. Great snow.

 

Wednesday 6: Do. Engaged with Mr Blunt.

 

Thursday 7: Do. Do. Boudarde.

 

Friday 8: Do. Mr Blunt left us.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Stamford went to Nantwich. Engaged perusing papers again in Swinnerton v. Wright & also the Minutes and papers in Roebotham & Rogers previous to making any Award in the latter Cause.

 

Sunday 10: Do. Eliza very unwell with a Complaint in her face.

 

Monday 11: At home.

 

Tuesday 12: Do. Engaged in various accounts &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 3: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 14: At Newcastle relative to the Cause of Roebotham & Rogers & various other matters. Engaged to attend the Sessions on Tuesday next. Returned to dinner

 

Friday 15: At home.

 

Saturday 16: Engaged with Mr Swinnerton of Butterton all morning relative to the Cause of Swinnerton & Mr N. Wright . . . when I finally agreed to undertake the reference in conjunction with Sr. Jno. Heathcote. Stamford returned.

 

Page 207  

Sunday 17: At home. Fine Thaw.

 

Monday 18: Do. Do.

 

Tuesday 19: At Newcastle attending the Mayor & dined at the Roebuck. Supped & slept at Mr Bents. In the night high wind.

 

Wednesday 20: Engaged all morning at the Brewery posting Books &c & returned home to dinner.

 

Thursday 21: At home. I this day compleated(sic) my 43rd year. During the preceding night & through the whole of the day there was a most violent storm of wind, which did considerable damage in the neighbourhood & blew down four large fir trees on the highest part of the wood & completely broke off another in the middle. It also tore one of the largest oaks in the grounds  compleatly(sic) in two: but the building escaped without any material injury.

 

Friday 22: Do. Fine mild day. Engaged about the farm

 

Saturday 23: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 24: Do. 

 

Monday 25: Do. Alcock who staid all night

 

Tuesday 26:At Newcastle on various affairs. Wood & Caldwell Johnson's insolvency. Marsh Accts. Beckett & Caldwell. Lloyds Acct. Wedgwood's do. &c &c returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 27: At home. Fine mild day. Began yesterday the Asparagus beds in the Garden.

 

Thursday 28: At home. Engaged planting &c.

 

Friday 29: Do. Do. Removing the large laurels on the slope. Capn. Sneyd called.

 

Saturday 30: Do.

 

Sunday 31: Do.

 

February, Monday 1: At Newcastle on various matters particularly appointing a day for the draining to be viewed for which I had made a claim of the Agricultural Societys . . .

 

Page 208  

Tuesday 2: At home. Engaged writing various Letters &c.

 

Wednesday 3: Messrs. Sneyd, Sparrow, Poole, Adams, Bent & . . .[Clornam] dined, but Mr Yoxall being prevented from coming the view of the draining was postponed. Very wet day.

 

Thursday 4: At home.

 

Friday 5: Do. Began taking down the fence which divides the Pool field from the large Hollins field & engaged with the Men.

 

Saturday 6: At home.

 

Sunday 7: Do. In the evening Thos. Hassell came to his place.

 

Monday 8: At Home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 9: Do.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. 

 

Thursday 11: At Newcastle attending a Meeting of the Corporation relative to the intended new branch of Road to Shilton from the Uttoxeter Road

 

Friday 12: At home. Engaged all morning in the matter of Roebotham & Rogers, & taking the examination of Mr Chas. Booth.

 

Saturday 13: At home.

 

Sunday 14: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined.

 

Monday 15: Do. Engaged all morning with Mr Breck & Mr Thos. Yoxall who came to view the draining for which I had made a Claim of the Gold Medal given by the Agricultural Society. Alcock. Mr Wilbraham called.

 

Tuesday 16: At Newcastle attending a meeting of the Agricultural Society when the Gold Medal was adjudged to me. Slept at Mr Bents.

 

Page 209 

Wednesday 17: Engaged all morning at the Brewery & various matters at Newcastle particularly respecting my undertaking the Office of Umpire, in the disputed Accounts &c  of Harrison & Co.s Bank, which I at length consented to do, one of the Arbitrators refusing otherwise to proceed on the business. returned to dinner.

 

Thursday 18: At home.

 

Friday 19: Do. Engaged with workmen.

 

Saturday 20: Do. Do. Miss S. taken ill of a Qunsey(sic) [throat inflammation usually of the tonsils]

 

Sunday 21: Do.

 

Monday 22: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 23: At Bradwall settling the Draught of the Agricultural premiums for the ensuing year with Mr Sneyd & from thence to Newcastle attending the . . .[secretaries]

 

Wednesday 24.: At home engaged on the farm

 

Thursday 25: Do. Do. Sent M Robinsons gun to London

 

Friday 26: Do. Do. Mr Penlington

 

Saturday 27: Do. Stamford taken ill with . . . sore throat.

 

Sunday 28: Do. Mr Barrow dined advising relative to the Settlement of his family concerns with his mother & in the afternoon Mr Bent came.

 

March, Monday 1: At Newcastle Fair purchased a milking cow for £19 returned to dinner. On my return met Mr & Mrs Hardman.

 

Tuesday 2: At home. Mr Barrow again on his affairs when I agreed to meet Mr Duckworth at Wilmslow to endeavour to settle the matters on dispute between his mother and himself. Purchased a bay Colt from Revd. Mr. Hickin for £24 . . .[nearing] 4 years old.

 

Wednesday 3: At Newcastle but Mr Hardman & Mr Bent being gone coursing to Keele & Mrs Wm Bent being confined

 

Page 210 

on which account we could not dine with him I returned to dinner. found Mr Broughton relative to his affairs & the arbitration with Sir J. B. &c. &c.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Mr Fritche

 

Friday 5: Do.

 

Saturday 6: Do.

 

Sunday 7: Do.

 

Monday 8: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 9: Do.

 

Wednesday 10: Mr Skerrett the Revd. Mr Salmon & Mr Penlington dined relative to Mr Penlingtons affairs when I finally proposed the following arbitration viz. Each party to nominate an Arbitrators(sic) which Arbitrators should choose a Counsel to settle all legal points that might arise & an Umpire to decide any question between the Arbitrators. Mr S. promised an answer in a week or 10 days.

 

Thursday 11: Engaged with Mr Skerrett surveying Mr Penlingtons Estates out all morning.

 

Friday 12: At Newcastle. returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 13: Mr Skerrett left us.

 

Sunday 14: At home

 

Monday 15: At home. Alcock who staid all night. In the afternoon Mr Barrow on his affairs in consequence of a letter recd. from Mr Duckworth.

 

Tuesday 16: At Newcastle to converse with Mr Bent on Barrows affairs. Attending Uttoxeter Turnpike Road Meeting when order made for the intended new branch to Shilton.

 

Page 211

Wednesday 17: At home.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Mr Boudarde

 

Friday 19: Dined at Butterton Eliza Miss S Louisa & self. Dr Northern. very cold wind.

 

Saturday 20: At home. Began sowing oats in the field under the wood. very cold but clear.

 

Sunday 21: In the morning received a Letter from Mr Broughton relative to proposals from Sir Thos. Broughton for concluding the Saltworth affairs which I sent to Mr Gilbert. At noon Mr & Mrs Barrow & Mr Martin arrived relative to their affairs which after much discussion & consultation I put into a train for being settled. In the afternoon Mr Gilbert, relative to Mr Broughtons affairs & with whom I was engaged till late at night.

 

Monday 22: Mr Broughton arrived at noon, and in the afternoon Mr Gilbert, engaged till late at night in the discussion of these affairs, when Mr G entirely concurred in the opinion I had given Mr B to relinquish his share in the partnership upon the terms offered by Sr. T. B.

 

Tuesday 23: Mr B went after breakfast having furnished him with a memorandum of the Calculations made by Mr G & myself & which  had decided our opinion.

 

Wednesday 24: At Burslem. Began taking down the fence between Mr Shaws Ground & the Hollins which promises to be a great improvement - Mr Turnock.

 

Thursday 25: At Newcastle again relative to Mr & Mrs Barrows affairs perusing Drft. of a Deed when I recommended it to be laid before Counsel.

 

Page 212 

Friday 26: At home

 

Saturday 27: Do. In the evening Mr Josiah Potts arrived.

 

Sunday 28: Do. Mr Potts left us in the morning. Parted with the little bay horse.

 

Monday 29: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 30: Do. Engaged with Wm Dale  receiving Rent & afterwards with Walker.

 

Wednesday 31: At home. Rogers who appointed to try his Witness on Tuesday next

 

April, Thursday 1: At Burslem on various affairs looking over Grange Farm &c. Mrs & Miss Wood appointed to come to Linley on Saturday.

 

Friday 2: At home

 

Saturday 3: Mrs & Miss Wood came to dinner. Mr Blunt & Mr Vale also dined. In the Evening Mr Wood came.

 

Sunday 4: Mr Bent dined advising relative to the purchase of Miss Beards Land in the Kings field at Newcastle & also relative to the proposed tax on Malt hops and Beer.

 

Monday 5: At home engaged with Mr Wood. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 6: Engaged all morning in the Cause of Roebotham & Rogers examining Witnesses on the behalf of the Defendt. In the evening engaged with Mr Cox advising on sundry matters.

 

Wednesday 7: At Basford calling upon Mr James Bent on his return from Egypt. Sundry matters at the Brewery Mrs Barrow &c but returned to dinner.

 

Thursday 8: In the afternoon went to Newcastle with Eliza & Hannah to attend a Ball & supper in consequence of the signing of the definitive Treaty, which was very numerously attended. Returned late.

 

Friday 9: Engaged all morning with Mr Bent drawing up observations on the proposed tax on Malt hops & Beer & writing Letters to Lord Granville Lewison Mr

 

Page 213 

Egerton & Mr Borthe therewith. Bent dined.

 

Saturday 10: At home, Engaged on the farm, workmen &c.

 

Sunday 11: Do. Mr Wood.

 

Monday 12: Do. Heavy Snow. Mr Wood went before dinner. Alcock who staid all night.

 

Tuesday 13: At home.

 

Wednesday 14: Do.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mrs & Miss Wood returned home.

 

Friday 16: At Newcastle dining with Mr Bent Jas. Bent Mr Wood of Burslem Mr R Wood J Bent . all night.

 

Saturday 17: Engaged all morning settling Brewery Books returned to dinner. Hannah Stamford & 2 girls went to Nantwich.

 

Sunday 18: At home.

 

Monday 19: Eliza &c went to Nantwich. dined myself at Burslem. settling accts.

 

Tuesday 20: At Stone attending Navigation Meeting

 

Wednesday 21: Returned from Stone

 

Thursday 22: Went to Nantwich

 

[Friday 23 to Friday 30 bracketed together and labelled 'At Nantwich']

May, Saturday 1: Returned from Nantwich in the afternoon leaving Hannah behind. Eliza Mary & self on horseback.

 

Page 214 

Sunday 2: At home. bad cold

 

Monday 3: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 4: Do.

 

Wednesday 5: Do.

 

Thursday 6: Do. Mrs Jos. Wedgwood &c called. Boudarde

 

Friday 7: Do. Engaged receiving Mr Penlingtons rents who with his son dined. In the afternoon Mr Blunt relative to Newcastle Election, & the intended nomination of Mr Smith the Banker to succeed Mr Egerton

 

Saturday 8: At home.

 

Sunday 9: Mr Wm Bent with Mr Jas. Bent & Captn. Sneyd dined. Mr . . .[Fort] relative to the reference made to me by the Assessors of Mr . . .[Tilston] of the value of the . . .[Shor?] in Newcastle with . . .[work]

 

Monday 10: At home. Alcock. Stamford returned in consequence of Mr Blunt being engaged on the Cause which Mr Bortle & Mr Smith had commenced this morning at Newcastle.

 

Tuesday 11: At home.

 

Wednesday 12: Dined at Botley at Sr. Thos Fetchers Mrs & Miss Wedgwood & Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood. 

 

Thursday 13: At home. Boudarde. Miss Stamford returned with Anne & Bessy.

 

Friday 14: At Newcastle relative to a Memorial against the 30. Clause in the Beer Ale & Malt additional duties Act & engaged all morning with Mr Bent on this business. returned to dinner & found Mr Wood with whom engaged on the Colliery & other matters.  . . ., Wedgwood &c having at length signed an Agreement respecting the getting & . . . of their Coals. In the Evening Mrs & Miss Crompton & 3 children arrived.

 

Page 215 

Saturday 15: Engaged all morning in preparing a Memorial to be sent by the Maltsters to Mr Vansittart for a modification or repeal of the . . . Clause in the Act, & stating the nature of the case &c. In the forenoon lost the bay carthorse Ball owing to a Complaint in the Bowels occasioned as we supposed by his having been suffered to eat too much coarse grass under the hedges. A most excellent & valuable animal, that it will be very difficult to replace. In the afternoon Miss Willett arrived.

 

Sunday 16: Between 6 & 7 o Clock this morning a heavy fall of Snow which completely(sic) covered the ground & loaded the trees giving the Country the appearance of December.

 

Monday 17: At home. Snow in the morning 3 or 4 inches deep on the level. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 18: Do. still very cold got a few early potatoes out of the open border.

 

Wednesday 19: Do. Miss Wedgwood dined.

 

Thursday 20: Do. Boudarde

 

Friday 21: Do.

 

Saturday 22: Mr Sparrow called went with him to Rode relative to the action brought by Mr Wilbraham agt. some . . .[workmen] of the . . .[Navigt.] Co. for getting Clay. Mr Sparrow dined.

 

Sunday 23: At Newcastle in consequence of a Letter from Mr Sparrow attending the returning Officers advising on sundry matters relative to the Election. dined at Mr Sparrows with Mr Bent.

 

Page 216 

 

Monday 24: At Newcastle attending a Navign. Meeting relative to the demand made by Mr Breck for injury done by making the Canal. Finally settled the damages in the Cause of Roebotham v Rogers at 200 Guineas. Settled also the value of the Shares in Newcastle water works which had been referred to me to pay 7 ½ p Cent to the purchaser & engaged on various other matters but returned to  dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 25: Engaged all morning on the Canal viewing the Trespass for which Mr Wilbraham had brought his action, taking the examination of witnesses &c & afterwards writing a state of the Case & Letter therewith to Mr Sparrow.

 

Wednesday 26: At home. In the evening Mr Wilbraham & Mr Witterham called the former with a message from Mr Bootle.

 

Thursday 27: At Burslem. On my return found Mr Bent & Mr Wm Broadhurst of Mansfield who dined much discussion & consideration of the Maltsters prohibition Clause. when I recommended a deputation of Maltsters to wait upon Mr Vansittart. Boudarde.

 

Friday 28: At home. Miss Wedgwood & Miss Willett called. Got early potatoes for use.

 

Saturday 29: The Ladies at Newcastle to see the Brewery. fine rain

 

Sunday 30: At home.

 

Monday 31: Mrs Crompton &c left us. Alcock.

 

June, Tuesday 1: Dined at Etruria with St. Thos. Fletchers family.

 

Wednesday 2: At home engaged with Accounts &c. Executed award relative to the value of the Shares in Newcastle Water Works which I fixed at £66.12/6 each. the original subscription being £50. Also sent final instructions for my award in Roebotham v Rogers fixing the Plts. damages & Costs at £210. Eliza brought Mrs W Bent to dinner.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Boudarde. In the Eveng. Mr Bent.

 

Page 217 

Friday 4: At home

 

Saturday 5: Do. In the evening Mr Bent

 

Sunday 6: Do. In the evening Mr & Mrs Bent returned. Violent flash of Lightening in the afternoon

 

Monday 7: At Newcastle fair. Bought a Mare & a Cow for the Brewery returned to dinner & in the Evening went to Burslem with Eliza Ann & Emma

 

Tuesday 8: At Burslem

 

Wednesday 9: Do. but returned home in the Evening

 

Thursday 10: At home. had Cold. Blunt came to dinner. Funnaly.

 

Friday 11: Do.

 

Saturday 12: At Bostock house with Mr Penlington fishing

 

Sunday 13: At home.

 

Monday 14: Do. Sr. Thos. Lady & Miss Fletcher Miss Braybent Mr Fletcher Mrs & Miss Wedgwood Mrs Darwin & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood dined. Mrs & Miss W staid all night.

 

Tuesday 15: At Newcastle relative to the further representation to Mr Vansittart on the subject of the prohibition of  . . .[wetting] Malt. Finished the paper returned to dinner.

 

 

Wednesday 16: At home. Mr & Mrs Shepherd Mr B & Miss Rowerson called on their way to Paris.

 

Thursday 17: At home. Boudarde. In the eving. Mrs & Miss Woods came

 

Friday 18: At home. In the Evening at Etruria returned with Miss Stamford. Conversation relative to the unpleasant situation of Mrs Mills, when I promised my advice & assistance. On my return found Mr Wood.

 

Saturday 19: At Newcastle relative to Counsel being employed for the returning Officers at the approaching Election; a measure which I strongly recommended and it was finally agreed to request the four Candidates to fix upon Counsel that would be satisfactory to themselves & that they shd. be written or applied to accordingly by the Town Clerk, Found a handsome & satisfactory Letter from Mr Vansittart. Mr Wood.

 

Page 218 

Sunday 20: Mrs Clement Sneyd & Mrs Mills called & dined. . . .[????dation] to her affairs, Children &c. In the evening the Woods left us.

 

Monday 21: At home. Engaged in reading Election Cases &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: Mr & Mrs Potts of Ollerton came to dinner.

 

Wednesday 23: Engaged with Mr Potts.

 

Thursday 24: Do. Boudarde. In the afternoon Mr Clemt. Sneyd, who brought for my perusal the Settlement made on the Marriage of Mrs Mills & the will of the late Mr Mills of Barlaston with or. [?other] papers. Engaged with these affairs till late Mr Sneyd staying all night.

 

Friday 25: Mr Sneyd went after breakfast. Engaged with Mr Potts.

 

Saturday 26: Mr & Mrs Potts went after Breakfast. Stamford returned from Nantwich & dined with me at Burslem. Returned in the Evening with Miss S. P. & Mary.

 

Sunday 27: Dined at Mr Furnivals at Sandbach. Mr Bent Walthall & Barrow

 

Monday 28: At home engaged in reading proceedings of  . . .[Committee] on Newcastle . . . & Elections. Alcock

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Do.

 

Wednesday 30: At Newcastle races. dined at the ordinary & returned after the Ball [The ordinary was a public meal provided at a fixed time and price in an Inn]. No race for want of horses.

 

July, Thursday 1: At Newcastle again. Sr. Rob. Lawley began canvass in lieu of Mr Smith who had declined. At the play & afterwards returned home.

 

Friday 2: At home

 

Saturday 3: Do.

 

Sunday 4: Do.

 

Page 219 

Monday 5: In the Evening went to Newcastle in order to attend the Election as Recorder.

 

Tuesday 6: At Newcastle attending the Election Candidates. E. W. Bootle, Sr. Rob. Lawley, Oliver Beckett & Joseph James dined at Wilkins. slept at Mr Bents.

 

Wednesday 7: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 8: Do. Do.

 

Friday 9: About one oClock Election ended. Majority of 65 for Mr Bootle & 64 for Sr. Rob. Lawley. In  the Evening returned home with the satisfactory reflection of this arduous business having been gone through in a manner that gave satisfaction to both parties, and without the smallest accident or mischief having been done through the whole course of it, though much was apprehended from the violence and heat of the parties at its commencement. Found Miss Harwood and Bessy at Linley Wood on their return from Matlock.

 

Saturday 10: At home. Much indisposed in consequence of the hurry & fatigue of the Election.

 

Sunday 11: Do. Mr Jno. Garnett dined.

 

Monday 12: At Burslem, Mr Wood returned with me to dinner. Found Mr & Mrs Broughton. The former relative to the final settlement of his affairs with Sr. Thos B. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: At home

 

Wednesday 14: At Nantwich Races

 

Thursday 15: Do.

 

Friday 16: Returned from Nantwich. Met Miss H & Bessy on their road to Nantwich.

 

Saturday 17: At Newcastle to have met Mr Wood relative to Colliery business but he did not come. Dined at Mr Walthalls with Mr & Mrs W Bent

 

Page 220 

Sunday 18: At home

 

Monday 19: Do. Mr Tollett called engaged to meet me at Foxlow on Friday at 11oclock for the purpose of looking over his farming Improvements & afterwards to dine at Linley Wood. Alcock. Miss S with Mary & Louisa set off to Prestatyn.

 

Tuesday 20: At home. Mr Jas. & Mr Thos. Bent dined having accompanied Miss Bent & Miss Furnival who came to spend a few days.

 

Wednesday 21: At home very wet. engaged in reading

 

Thursday 22: Do. Do.

 

Friday 23: At Foxlow meeting Mr Tollett & Mr Skerrett who afterwards dined at Linley & Mr S staid all night. Great improvements making by Mr T upon his farm particularly in watering meadow, & in Stock. The Devon & Hereford Oxen very fine, & the former promising to be useful for Draught, being lighter & more active than the . . .[bruds] used in this Country.

 

Saturday 24: Dined at Botley Hall. Mr T, Messrs Rob Hill, Jno. Hill, Mr & Mrs Hinchliffe, Northern Mr & Mrs Wickstead. Engaged to dine with Mr Hinchliffe on Monday second..

 

Sunday 25: At home.

 

Monday 26: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 27: At home.

 

Wednesday 28: Do. Mr & Mrs Skerrett arrived

 

Thursday 29: Do.

 

Friday 30: Do.

 

Saturday 31: Do

 

Page 221 

August, Sunday 1: At home. Mr Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 2: Dined at Mr Hinchliffes pursuant to my engagement. Mr & Mrs Wickstead & Dr Northern.

 

Tuesday 3: At home. Alcock & his son. Musick

 

Wednesday 4: At Burslem Mr Skerrett having gone to Nantwich

 

Thursday 5: At home. Mr Wood dined. Boudarde. In the Evg. Mr S returned.

 

Friday 6: Do. Messrs Yoxalls, Mr & Mrs R Skerrett & Mr Joseph Adams dined.

 

Saturday 7: At home. This morning the first brick laid of the new Building in the Alsager Estate. Blunt dined. Miss Stamford & the Children returned from Prestatyn.

 

Sunday 8: At home

 

Monday 9: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 10: Do.

 

Wednesday 11: Do. Ann & Bessy arrived from Nantwich

 

Thursday 12. Do.

 

Friday 13: Do.

 

Saturday 14: Mr & Mrs Skerrett left us. At Burslem on various matters previous to my setting off on my intended Tour into Scotland

 

Sunday 15: At home.

 

Monday 16: Set off to Manchester on my journey into Scotland.

 

[gap in the entries until September]

 

September, Friday 3: Returned from my Journey and arrived at Linley Wood about four oClock in the afternoon after a very pleasant & satisfactory excursion.

 

Page 222 

Saturday 4: At home.

 

[The next entry actually begins on the next line after the previous entry with the date written adjacent to the last line of the entry, not as I have rendered it below]

 

Monday 27: A number of engagements the consequence of my absence from home so completely occupied my attention for a short time after my return that the Journal was neglected but I resume it this day when I went to Stone to attend the Navigation Meeting

 

Tuesday 28: Returned from Stone with Mr Kinnersley in his Carriage to Newcastle calling at Trentham on Mr Jas. Hardman.

 

Wednesday 29: At home. Began putting up the post & Chain fence before the house.

 

Thursday 30: At Newcastle attending the Agricultural Meeting & returned in the Evening.

 

October, Friday 1: At home engaged with workmen.

 

Saturday 2: Do. Mr Blunt & Mr McEvoy dined previous to the former [JC means 'latter' - see entry for 9th.] beginning to instruct the Children in writing of accounts & which he engaged to commence on Saturday next & to continue each Saturday afternoon at a salary of 10 Gns per Annum.

 

Sunday 3: At home.

 

Monday 4: Do. Alcock & his son

 

Tuesday 5: At Newcastle dining as Recorder with the Mayor. Staid all night & slept at Bents.

 

Wednesday 6: Engaged all  morning in examining & settling Brewery Accounts previous to their final closing for the year. Dined at Mr Bents. Barbor relative to the Cotton weaving scheme which was at length determined upon. On my return found Miss S & Ann & Bessy returned from their Northern journey.

 

Thursday 7: At home. Boudarde. busy sowing wheat. Workmen finished putting up posts & chains.

 

Friday 8: At Burslem. Looking at the draining on the farm &c. &c.

 

Saturday 9: At home. In the afternoon Mr McEvoy who began his instruction of the Children in writing &c. &c.

 

Page 223 

Sunday 10: At home.

 

Monday 11: Do. Alcock & in the afternoon his son. purchased a bay colt from Wilshaw at £28.2

 

Tuesday 12: Do. Engaged on the farm

 

Wednesday 13: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 14: At Burslem. Found Mr Wood returned from Chester much indisposed.

 

Friday 15: At home.

 

Saturday 16: At Newcastle. Long conversation with Mr Bent previous to his going down to Manchester on the Cotton business. In the afternoon Michl. Ashmore relative to dispute with Mr Babington.

 

Sunday 17: At home.

 

Monday 18: At Burslem. Mr Wood better

 

Tuesday 19: At home. Heavy rain so much so as to prevent my going to Alsager on dispute between Messrs Babington Twemlow & Ashmore.

 

Wednesday 20: At Newcastle. Breakfasted with Bent in consequence of the information he had procured at Manchester & determined finally to relinquish the Cotton Scheme. Retd. to Dinner.

 

Thursday 21: In the morning Mr Twemlow & afterwards meetg. him Mr Babington & Michal(sic) Ashmore at Alsager Lodge & finally settling the dispute amongst them relative to the farm held by Michal A. under Mr B & Mr Twemlow . . .[coming] upon the same. On my return found Mr Skerrett & Mr Penlington. Engaged receiving the rents of the latter. Boudarde

 

Friday 22: Engaged with Mr Skerrett on various matters &c.

 

Saturday 23: In the morning Mr S left us. In the afternoon very heavy rain.

 

Page 224 

Sunday24: At home.

 

Monday 25: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 26: Do.

 

Wednesday 27: At Betley House to dinner. In the evening Musick. Alcock & Fritche.

 

Thursday 28: Returned to dinner. Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 29: Prevented going to Newcastle agreeable to appointments to close Brewery annual accounts by heavy rain. At Noon Ann & Bessy left us,

 

Saturday 30: At Newcastle closing Books &c. A good account. Returned in the Evening.

 

Sunday 31: At home.

 

November, Monday 1: At Burslem. Alcock

 

Tuesday 2: At home. Engaged on the farm

 

Wednesday 3: Do.

 

Thursday 4: Do. Mr Blunt dined & Boudarde.

 

Friday 5: Mr Blunt left us after breakfast. Dined with Mr Gilbert &c. at the Red Bull being the Mayors feast. Elected Mayor for the ensuing year.

 

Saturday 6: At Wolstanton attending the funeral of Mrs . . .[Shordor]. Sr. Thos. Fletcher Adml. Child Mr Wm. Sneyd of Darlaston, Mr Thos. Sparrow Mr Bennett & self Bearers. Afterwards dined with Mr Wm Sneyd of Bradwall at Mr Sparrows.

 

Sunday 7: At home.

 

Monday 8: Do. Mr & Mrs Alcock &c dined. Cockshooting party in . . . Mr C Lawton &c. Musick

 

Tuesday 9: Cock shooting with Mr Cox: but found the Cover cleared

 

Wednesday 10: At . . .[Scabridge] dining with Mrs Swinnerton

 

Page 225 

Thursday 11: At home. Boudarde

 

Friday 12: At Butterton with Mr Swinnerton

 

Saturday 13: Returned from Butterton by Newcastle & Burslem. Found Mr Wood unwell.

 

Sunday 14: At home

 

Monday 15: Do. Conversation with Mr Chas. Lawton relative to Swallow Moor, Shooting &c. Alcock

 

Tuesday 16: At Burslem. Mr Wood still indisposed.

 

Wednesday 17: At home. Engaged all morning in the Plantations, removing Trees &c. In the afternoon Children writing. Evening Reading as usual. Mr Beardmore fetched wine from Mr Hill &c from Nantwich

 

Thursday 18: At home engaged again in the Plantations. Drawing case relative to Wm Dales conduct on the Alsager Estate. Boudarde. Mr Blunt came to dinner. Cold day with wind & at night heavy rain.

 

Friday 19: Do. The morning cold & rainy which prevented my going to Burslem. In the night a Fox had committed his depredation on a Turkey. NB. Examine the earth at the back of the fir wood. In the afternoon Mr Gibbons & Mr Bretherton relative to the information laid against them under the Stage Coach Act & advising them thereon. In the evening Miss Lawrence.

 

Saturday 20: At Burslem. Mr Wood still ill with a Rheumatic attack. Heavy Fog. Mr Salmon relative to his Title to the Rock Property, & advising him thereon. Mr McEvoy.

 

Sunday 21: Miss Lawrence went early. At home as usual.

 

Monday 22: At home. Sent Measures of Barkley to Newcastle. Wm Dales cattle still on the Clover. directed Wm to observe it. Alcock all night. At night drawing Mr Woods will, in consequence of an unfavourable account of him & to prevent the mischiefs of procrastination & . . . affairs of so much consequence.

Page 226 

Tuesday 23: At Burslem, Mr Wood still very indifferent. Left the will with him & returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 24: At home. Engaged on various matters, Boudarde.

 

Thursday 25: At Burslem. Mr Wood still very indifferent. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 26: Engaged in planting willows at Swallow Moor Gate. Mr Penlington & Mr George Audley. The former relative to the road through the Packhorse farm, the latter relative to the annuities given under the late Mr Ps will to himself & his sister. Advising on these matters. Mr P. & Mr A to dine here at three on Thursday next.

 

Saturday 27: At Burslem. Mr Wood still very indifferent.

 

Sunday 28: At home. Engaged as usual.

 

Monday 29: At Newcastle on various matters. Brewery. Proposed purchase from Beckett of his share of  House &c on the Marsh. Purchase from Turnock & paying £500 in part. Left with Mr Swinnerton by an order on Kinnersley,. Conversation relative to the intended new Bank. Appointments with the Mayor &c to dine at Linley on Friday the 10th.

 

Tuesday 30: At home. Engaged with Wm Dale, when I amicably settled with him all disputes & received his rent. Settled with Mr Cox the straightening of the . . .[sunk] fence. The rent of the Stancliffe wood to be 2 Gnes.

 

December, Wednesday 1: At Burslem. Mr Wood better.

 

Thursday 2: At home. Mr Penlington Mr Geo Audley & Mr W Penlington dined.

 

Friday 3: Do. wet stormy day.

 

Saturday 4: [No entry]

 

Page 227 

Sunday 5: At home.

 

Monday 6: At Burslem. Mr Wood better.

 

Tuesday 7: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Wednesday 8: Coursing with Mr Wm Cox & Gibbons, but no Success.

 

Thursday 9: At Trentham attending Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting for receiving Constables Lists of Militia & hearing appeals, & detained till late & not being able to get through the business adjourned to Wednesday next at ½ past 11.

 

Friday 10: Mr Smith the Mayor Messrs Fenton Clannam Poole Nutkisson Miller Plant Sparrow Hollins Martin & Jn. Swinnerton dined

 

Saturday 11: At home.

 

Sunday 12: Do.

 

Monday 13: Do.

 

Tuesday 14: At Wheelock dining at Mr Watkiss. Mr & Mrs Bayley Mr & Miss Furnivall.

 

Wednesday 15: At Trentham attending adjourned Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting. Sr. Jno Chetwode Mr Powys Mr Kinnersley Hardman & self. dined with Mr K on my return.

 

Thursday 16: At home. In the morning sprained my shoulder. Boudarde. Mr Blunt dined & staid all night.

 

Friday 17: At home.

 

Saturday 18: Do.

 

Sunday 19: Do. Bent dined.

 

Monday 20: Do. Alcock. In the evening Mr Skerrett & the Colonel arrived.

 

Tuesday 21: Engaged with the Gentlemen.

 

Wednesday 22: Mr S & the Col. left us. Mr Penlington on his affairs.

 

Page 228 

Thursday 24: At home. Mr Boudarde. In the evening sent the origl Agreement between  . . .[Gallimories] & Wood & Caldwell to Mr Wood by a Messenger who brought some Bills &c.

 

[Rest of page blank]

 

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[Blank page]

 

Page 230 

[Blank page]

 

Page 231 

[most of page blank, entries written at the bottom of the page. Month and year not shown but taken to be 1803, January]

Saturday 22: Col. & Mr Skerrett left us under a strong impression of the superior merit & accomplishment of the former who . . .[holds] fair to be a high military character.

 

Sunday 23: At home.

 

Monday 24: At home. Alcock. In the evening Dr & Miss Crompton & Edwd.

 

Tuesday 25: At home.

 

Page 232 (49)

Wednesday 26: Delivered to Mr Salmon the . . . [writings] belonging to Property late Amy Beresford.

 

Thursday 27: At home.

 

Friday 28: Do. 

 

Saturday 29: Do. Miss Stamford & Ann with Edwd. Crompton set off to Birmingham.

 

Sunday 30: The Dr & Miss Crompton left us. The Dr & Edwd. in the course of the week killed 5 brace of birds.

 

Monday 31: At Newcastle on various matters. returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

February, Tuesday 1: At home. Engaged with the workmen at the Alteration of the Road at Holcots Cottage.

 

Wednesday 2: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 3: At Newcastle attending Agricultural Meeting. Elected President for the ensuing year. Sr. J Heathcote Vice. Staid at Newcastle all night.

 

Friday 4: Returned to dinner

 

Saturday 5: At Betley dining at St. Thos. Fletchers Mr & Mrs Bayley. Called at Mr Broughton on his affairs & brought various papers to peruse.

 

Sunday 6: At home

 

Monday 7: Do. Engaged with workmen. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 8: Do. Do. 

 

Wednesday 9: Do. Letter from Mr Jno. Gilbert stating the distressed situation of his affairs & requesting me to make an application on his behalf  to his Uncle.

 

Thursday 10: Miss Bent & Mr Blunt dined. In the evening at Newcastle Assembly. Long discussion with Bent relative to the application making by the Common Brewers to obtain a transfer of the new Duties in Beer Ale &c to Malt. Determined not to take any active part.

 

Page 233 

Friday 11: At home. Engaged with the workmen.

 

Saturday 12: Do. In the afternoon Wm Dale 

 

Sunday 13: Do. Wm Bent dined

 

Monday 14: At Burslem. Alcock. Ashmore

 

Tuesday 15: Do. Engaged with workmen at the water wheel which had suffered from being worked in the frost.

 

Wednesday 16: Do. In the evening late Miss Stamford & Ann returned from Birmingham.

 

Thursday 17: At home.

 

Friday 18: Do. Mr Wood came to dinner & staid all night. Conversation on Colliery &c.

 

Saturday 19: At Blurton with Mr Blunt looking over the grounds belonging to the Parsonage house in order to their being planted & improved. Dined at Mr Bents with Messrs Atkins, Sneyd, Halliday, Blunt & Sparrow & returned home at night.

 

Sunday 20: At home. Engaged as usual. Read the Review of Durnonts edition of Benthams Treatises on Legislation contained in the Appendix with the . . .[leading] principles of which I perfectly agree. He thinks that the public welfare is the only end, the only object of intrinsic value, and that political liberty is but a relative good, one of the means of the greatest of all arriving at this end. That the best institution for any people is that to which it is accustomed, and that the existing government is the instrument by which amelioration is to be affected. That where good Laws prevail, the public Welfare may exist in a high degree, even if there is no political liberty; and that where most political liberty exists, if the Laws are bad, the people will necessarily be most miserable. In short, to preserve while correcting, to study circumstances, to humour ruling even if unreasonable prejudices, to prepare innovations so gradually that finally they appear not to be such, to avoid

 

Page 234 

derangements of and shocks to property & power, not to disturb the channel of hopes and habits, to reform a basis without detriment to present interests - are the Lessons which he inculcates, and which seem to me to be founded on the true principles of political Justice to form the wisest & most beneficial practice in Legislation

 

Monday 21: At home. Engaged with Alcock & Mr Scott in the repair of the Piano forte, which on taking to pieces I found to be a much more delicate & complex piece of machinery than I had imagined.

 

Tuesday 20[subsequent dates to Sunday 25 are transcribed as rendered incorrectly in the diary]: Do. Do. In this evenings Star in the report of Ld Ellenborough's observations in the matter of the King agt. . . .[Bertagize], he said he took this distinction

" If a person introduced another, who was innocent, to commit a crime, in order to be his accuser, that was a crime of the highest enormity a man could be guilty of. But if a man had been in the habitual course of committing crimes, and there was a difficulty of proving it and bringing him to punishment, from the manner in which they were committed, there was no impropriety in laying before him an inducement to an open disclosure, in order to prevent the future commission of such enormities; it was not only innocent, but doing a beneficial Service to Society."

 

Wednesday 21: At home. Mr Bagley of the Wheelock called.

 

Thursday 22: At home. engaged Letter writing &c.

 

Friday 23: Do. As I am at this time reading Paley's Natural Theology to the children I was much pleased with the following extract in the Appendix to the Monthly Reviews from Professor Campers description of the Elephant as affording a striking instance of peculiar organization(sic) evincing Contrivance & design.

"In order to include the encephalon within proper bounds, and to allow a sufficient space for the insertion of muscles without loading the head with a weight of some matter, the tables are separated from each other, by a great number of bony partitions

 

Page 235 

prolonged to the distance of several inches. The intervals filled by an infinity of little cells more or less spacious, communicate with the throat by means of the Eustachian tube, and are charged with air, instead of blood or marrow, which are generally found in the diploe(sic) of the mammalia. Perrault, Blair, and Daubinton have remarked this structure in the elephant, boar and other quadrupeds; but Mr Camper was the first to notice its analogy with the structure of the cranium in birds. The ostrich, the eagle, but above all, the owl tribe, particularly the screech owl, have the tables of the skull separated by numerous cells, perfectly similar to those which distinguish the elephant. The atmospheric air enters them in the same way; and this admirable mechanism, which birds particularly require to diminish the weight of their bones, was necessary to the elephant, in order to lighten its head, which would have otherwise have been much more heavy than that of any other quadruped."

Description Anatomique d'un Elephant male 

by Peter Camper. Paris 1802

In the evening proceeded with Paley.

 

Saturday 24: In the morning Mr R Cox Junr. relative to the letters which I had received from Mr J Gilbert of Newsfield respecting the distressed situation of his affairs & requesting my interference with his Uncle. Afterwards at Newcastle at the Brewery. & appointed to attend a Meeting of Public Brewers at Birmingham on Wednesday 9th march, which Bent was particularly desirous for me to do. Returned to dinner. In the evening proceeded with Cecilia, which I have lately been reading up.

 

Sunday 25: At home. Engaged as usual. Remarkably high wind which tore up by the roots one of the Firs in the wood, N.W. In the evening proceeded in reading Paley. A reflexion (sic) 2. If there were no pain, could we, constituted as we are, be sensible of pleasure? And would there not be danger, that the most agreeable Sensations, if uninterrupted, & not contrasted with those of an opposite cast, might lead to that satiety which we so generally find to be the . . .[pari..t] of Ennui in the all the horrid train of imaginary evils, & not impregnantly terminating in tedium Vitae, & rendering human life more insupportable than the greatest accumulation of real & positive sufferings?

 

Page 236 

It will perhaps be found, on attentive observations to be a fact that the evils of the imagination affect those chiefly who are more exempt from any positive calamity or distress.

 

Monday 28:[note return to correct dates] At home. Perusing Mr Broughtons Deed of Dissolution of partnership with St Tho. Broughton & various papers relating to Sales of his Estates previous to returning the same to Mr B. with my opinion thereon tomorrow. Sent for a Milch cow from the Brewery. Alcock.

 

March, Tuesday 1: Morning very wet & stormy. Dined at Dodlespode. Mrs Mills. Long discussion with Mr Broughton on the partnership & other concerns. Returned in the Evening & found a Letter from the Revd. W. Atkinson of Catterick Yorkshire requesting some Deeds of Mr Yorks in order to their production on a Trial at York Assizes.

 

Wednesday 2: Engaged all morning selecting & making a short abstract of Mr Yorks Deeds previous to sending them to Mr Atkinson. Writing Letter to him &c & Mr Wm Hindley, to whom the Deeds were sent under cover to be forwarded from Manchester by the Leeds coach.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Boudarde. Mr Blunt to dinner.

 

Friday 4: Do. In the forenoon Mr Kinder with whom engaged all day.

 

Saturday 5: At Burslem with Mr Kinder, returned to dinner. Proposal by him for doing business for Mr C in America by Commission, but the plan not approved by Mr Wood.

 

Sunday 6: At home. In the Evening Mr Kinder left us.

 

Monday 7: Do. Alcock.

 

Page 237 

Tuesday 8: Went on horseback to Newcastle and from thence in a Chaise with Mr Bent to Birmingham to attend a Meeting of the Common Brewers appointed to be held tomorrow at the Stork Tavern on various matters relating to the Porter trade. Spent the Evg. at Mr Jno. Lawrence's.

 

Wednesday 9: Attending Meeting. Messrs Forrest (in the Chair) Worthington, Somerfield, Guddington, Lloyd, Jowle & selves.

Porter to be sold at 38/- at home to Dealers to which Carriage to be added. At 40/- to Publicans & Retailers.

 

Thursday 10: Returned home Bent, self & Mr Jowle. An acre of Cabbage will produce 70 Tons. Do. Turnips not more than 28 or 29.

 

Friday 11: At home. Mr Turnock & Mr Twemlow, relative to the security to be given by the latter for money agreed to be advanced by the former. Appointed to come tomorrow at 9 & bring the Deeds. Mr Penlington on his affairs, & the Lease of the . . . house at Rode proposed to be made to Mr Sherwin by Sr. Tho. Broughton & Mr Salmon. Appointed to meet Mr Salmon on Tuesday next at 11 at Rode on this business & the Accounts.

 

Saturday 12: Mr Twemlow & Mr Turnock perusing Deeds for them & advising them on the proper security, which they requested me to get prepared for them by Mr Martin against this day fortnight. Engaged at the Farm. Mr McEvoy. In the evening proceeded with Cecilia.

 

Sunday 13: At home. Mr Bent & Mr Walthall dined. Delvd. to the latter Mr Broughtons papers relative to Mr Edliston, & conversation thereon.

 

Monday 14: At Burslem. Bykers Colliery advising relative to the approaching Trial with Tolaright & appointed to meet the Witnesses & Mr Martin on Friday next to peruse the papers &c. Alcock.

 

Page 238 

Tuesday 15: At Rode Heath, to here meet Mr Salmon on Mr Penlingtons affairs, but he did not come. In the evening recommended reading Gibbon.

 

Wednesday 16: Engaged all day planting at Holcotts & in various matters relating to the farm. Gibbon.

 

Thursday 17: Do. Boudarde. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 18: At Burslem engaged the greatest part of the day & in examining witnesses & assisting Mr Martin in taking instructions for the Brief in the cause agt. Tolaright for getting Coals & throwing his mine water into Brows Land & which is expected to be tried at the ensuing Assizes. Dined at Mr Woods. Girls read in the Evening.

 

Saturday 19: Engaged all morning in  planting & enlarging the plantation on the left going to the farm. In the afternoon planted with my own hand 12 larch about the Reservoir about 18 inches or 2 feet in heighth(sic). Stamford filled up with larch of the same size the opening in the wood occasioned by the blowing over of the firs. Agreed with Saml. Seymour to come into Henry Beassingtons place on the 15th May next. Wages £25 or £26 at the end of the year at my option. In the evening read Cecilia.

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: Do. Engaged with Mr Johnson of Congleton & Mr Tolaright Junr. relative to the Cause intended to be tried at Stafford & which at Mr Johnsons request I consented should stand over till the next Assizes in order to try whether it could not be settled by arbitration. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Engaged in the Grounds: Bad account from Nantwich of the illness of Ann.

 

Page 239 

Wednesday 23: At home. Engaged in perusing & correcting 6 essays which I had received from Houghton on the subject of the material proofs of the immutability of the Soul, & which he had requested me to criticise previous to their being printed. In the evening drew the drat. of an address from the Mayor &c of Newcastle on the Kings escape from the late treasonable conspiracy.

 

Thursday 24: Engaged with the workmen laying out the road at Alcotts. John Burchall. Boudarde. In the afternoon engaged with Mr Ashmore & Beardmore relative to Alsager Estate. In the Evening read Gibbon.

 

Friday 25: Engaged again with the workmen at the Road. Mr & Mrs Hinchliffe & Mr Bover called. In the evening read Gibbon. Our whole family circle thrown into the greatest astonishment & distress by the intelligence which the Paper brought of the disgrace of Lt. Col.. Skerrett as expressed in the letter from the Adjutant Genl.

 

Saturday 26: At home engaged with the Labourers. In the afternoon on the business of Mr Turnock & Mr Twemlow when Monday Morning fixed for finishing it.

 

Sunday 27: At home.

 

Monday 28: In the morning early engaged with Mr Twemlow & Mr Turnock compleating their business. Mr Wedgwood of Bignall End requesting my attendance as a Commissioner at a Turnpike Meeting at Longport on Wednesday next. Afterwards at Newcastle pursuant to a Letter received from Mr Kinnersley & Investigating Mr Suttons Title to an Estate in Talk purchased by Mr K and on which closely engaged with Mr Sparrow several hours. Returned to dinner.

 

[Not labelled as such but this clearly continues on the next page as Tuesday 29th] At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting swearing in Militia Men. Sr. John

 

Page 240  March 1803

 

Tuesday 29: Chetwode Mr Kinnersley & self. Returned with Mr Kinnersley & dined with him. Engaged on Militia business, and also with Messrs Sparrow Wood & T Wedgwood who came to consult with me on the Turnpike business. On my return found Mr Skerrett.

 

Wednesday 30: Engaged with Mr Skerrett on the unfortunate business of his nephew. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Thursday 31: Mr S left us. At Burslem. breakfasted with Mr Wood, & afterwards attending Turnpike Meeting at Longport relative to the removal of Tunstall Toll Gate, when former order of Commrs. rescinded, & the gate which had been removed ordered to be reerected in the old situation. Fatiguing day there being much heat & dispute, near 60 Commrs. being present & the weight falling a good deal upon me. Mr Skerrett left us in the morning.

 

April, Friday 1: At Newcastle attending Meeting to consider of an Address to His Majesty when I moved the following which was seconded by Adml. Child & unanimously resolved upon and I was requested to present it to His Majesty as Recorder together with the members for the Borough. Dined at Mr Bents with the Mayor & Sparrow, & returned in the Evening. In the course of the day consultation with Mr R Skerrett on dissolution of his partnership concern with Hovitt & Loyle. Application from Mr Walthall Smith to act as an arbitrator in a matter at Cobridge, which I consented to.

 

Page 241  

[blank]

 

Page 242   May 1803

 

Saturday 2: At home. Engaged with Labourers. plastering &c.

 

Sunday 3: Do. Mr Wm Bent & Mr Cooke out of Lancashire relative to the Establishment by the latter of a weaving Manufactory.

 

Monday 4: At Burslem. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 5: [no entry]

 

Wednesday 6: Dined at Newcastle at Mr Bents Mr Gilbert &c. In the morning at Butterton on various matters & promised to dine tomorrow.

 

Thursday 7: At Butterton.

 

Friday 8: At home. Mr & Mrs Crompton of Chorley Hall, Mr . . .[Founce] & Mrs Poole came to breakfast & dined. Mr Skerrett

 

[rest of page blank]

 

Page 243  April 1803

 

Tuesday 19: Set off to London with Eliza, in order to present to His Majesty the Newcastle under Lyme Address. Passed through Birmingham & slept at warwick. After viewing the castle next morning proceeded by Edge hill to Stowe, where we dined & saw the Gardens &c. & slept at Aylesbury, where the accommodations very hard. Next morning proceeded to London & arrived in New Millman Street about 4. Dined & left Eliza there & proceeded to take possession myself of our Quarters at Osbornes Hotel. The apartments at this Hotel very good; but the other accommodations indifferent.

Monday 25th waited upon Mr Egerton in St. James Square & there being no Levee the following Wednesday appointed to go with him to St James's on Wednesday 4th May: on which day I met Sr. Robert Lawley who had come to Town, at Mr Egertons, from thence we proceeded accompanied by Mr Egerton Mr Wilbraham Egerton (it being his first appearance at Court) & a Sir . . . [Mar..] Sykes to the Levee.

The order of presenting an Address is as follows. Having written your name &c on a common visiting Card & given it to the Gentleman who presents you, he delivers it to the Lord in Waiting, who announces you to the King, when he comes to the place where you stand in the Circle, this is a small space within which is the King attended only by the Lord in Waiting. On the Lord in Waiting repeating your name, you deliver to him the Address, which you have all along kept in your hand, endorsed with the name of the place from whence, as well as by whom presented. The King then offers his hand, which gently raising you kiss, at the same time bending the Knee, but not so to touch the ground, & which is

 

Page 244  May 1803

 

easily & firmly as well as commodiously done by throwing back the left Leg. The King generally says a few words to the person presenting the Address & then moving on to the next, you are at liberty to retire, observing always to keep your face towards the Circle. The Levee was uncommonly crowded; and the press was so great as in getting out of a public place. I here saw . . . [Ardneossi] the french Ambassador and a great number of persons of the first destination, but whom it was impossible from the Crowd much to distinguish or observe. I went to Court in a full Dress of black with broad hemmed muslin Ruffles, french handkerchief tied to resemble a stock, . . . , blue sword & buckles. As the form of the Hat a little varies, it is always best to enquire at one of the Hatters at the Court and of the Town. Large flat silk hats seemed to prevail. These seeming trifles I mention, because a previous knowledge of them saves much trouble. You wear gloves. Being in a Kind of second mourning, mine were grey kid. The affair of going to Court, though appearing formidable to those who have never been there, is nothing at all, & rendered still more easy by the gracious, condescending & encouraging manner of his Majesty, which is of a kind to dispel all timidity & apprehension, the King was dressed in a full Sash of Regimentals, Scarlet faced with blue & which . . . & . . . & looked uncommonly well. The tone of his voice is remarkably pleasing & harmonious. He is a very fine looking man, & has the air & Carriage which one should expect in a Gentleman & a Prince

 

Page 245  April 1803

A little Book which I bought entitled A picture on London is a very useful Companion & to this I refer for particulars of public places exhibitions &c &c of which it gives a pretty correct account. For a Carriage horse & Coachman I gave eight guineas per week. You are at no other expense whatever except you choose to give some gratuity to the Coachman to whom after the rate of about 1 shilling a day is handsome. For  a footman I paid a guinea a week for attendance, & a guinea a week for board wages. To the Servants at Osbornes . . . butler & Chambermaid I gave 2 guineas. We had 3 beds & had been there about a fortnight altogether, & myself a week previous. This was thought handsome. These little particulars I mention because after an absence from London, one is sometimes at a loss about them and they may be useful to refer to on future occasions.

Upon the whole we had a great deal of Amusement in London & were fully satisfied with the Journey. Amongst the finest things I heard or saw was the annual concert at the Kings Theatre for the benefit of decayed Musicians. The Messiah was performed in the first style of excellence & in which Mrs Billington sang with great applause. In the song, "I know that my Redeemer Liveth" she was encored by the King. Mrs Billington is an admirable singer & delighted me by her sweetness rapidity & precision; but I did not think her body of tone equal to Madam . . .[Mara]. there was a most brilliant & fashionable audience the King Queen & Princesses and almost the whole of the British Court with the French Princes. Mrs Billington was said never to have sung ancient musick so well.

 

Page 246  April 1803

 

Eliza and I left London on Friday the [blank left] May & leaving Hannah & Bessy in Gower street & proceeded to Windsor to the Castle at which we stopped to see. From there to Oxford where we slept, Mr Fletcher spending the Eveng with us. the next morning we took a view of the most remarkable things in Oxford, the Buildings &c &c of which are well worth observation, & came to Blenheim where we took the long tour of the park, thinking this preferable to the inside of the House. Slept at Hockley & the next day ion the Evening arrived again at Linley Wood.

 

[written in the margin next to the above entry]

Windsor is well worth seeing. There is a wonderful fine picture of the . . .; but upon the whole Windsor did not equal my expectations. At Oxford a stranger shd. go to the top of the Radcliffe library in order to have a view of the City. Fine picture in the gallery at Christ Church of the family of Annabel . . .[Garsacci] in a Butchers Shop.

 

 

 

 

Since my return I have been too much engaged to resume this journal but which I now propose continuing.

 

Wednesday 25: [May] Engaged at Lawton Moss & the Red bull on reference of a Cause in the Kings Bench Cox agt. Lowe relative to a right of way across new Inclosures. All day. examining witnesses &c. &c.

 

Thursday 26: At home. Unwell in consequence of having been wet yesterday. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 27: Still very unwell. Inflammatory sore throat & fever. In the afternoon Mr Peak & Mr Ashley viewing the pair of Land in the front of the house, for laying down which I had claimed the premium offered by the Agricultural Society.

 

Saturday 28: Confined to my room.

 

Sunday 29: Do.

 

Page 247  May 1803

 

Monday 30: Do.

 

Tuesday 31: Do.

 

June, Wednesday 1: Do. Mr Wood relative to the intended reduction by the Minister in the duty of China ware from India & the opposition . . . made thereunto. Mr Bent.

 

Thursday 2: Do.

 

Friday 3: Do.

 

Saturday 4: Do. Went out for the first time, but much fatigued.

 

Sunday 5: Confined all day. In the afternoon Mr Wood.

 

Monday 6: Went out. Considerably better. Alcock. In the Evening received from Mr Brandon the Case, relative to the Accts of the late Mr Child of Cheadle & Mr & Mrs Bourne referred to Mr Bainbridge & self.

 

Tuesday 7: Perusing & considering the case received last night. Arranging various papers & Accounts. Mr Wm Cox with Mr Athertons opinion on the Lease from Mr Lawton to Messrs. . .[Leatherfield] &c. of the Trabshaw Colliery, & which coincided with the one I had myself given. Advising further on the business.

 

Wednesday 8: The anniversary of the happy day which united me with my Eliza: and with whom I have now spent nineteen years in the unvarying course of boundless confidence & tender affection, each succeeding year adding to their force, as remembrance her still continued to swell with added proofs of  recollected love.

"How sensibly do I feel the truth of the observation made by lord Avery; Whenever in step out of domestic life in search of felicity, we come back again disappointed, tired, and chagrined. One day passed under our own roof is worth a thousand in any other place. the noise and bustle, or, as they are foolishly called, the diversions of life, are despicable and tasteless, when we have once experienced the real delights of a fireside."

 

Thursday 9: At home. Some return of my Complaint.

 

Friday 10: Do. Still very unwell.

 

Page 248  June 1803

 

Saturday 11: At home

 

Sunday 12: Do. In the house all day.

 

Monday 13: Do. Better. Engaged perusing & considering Houghton's Essays.

 

Tuesday 14: Do. Mr Skerrett.

 

Wednesday 15: Do.

 

Thursday 16: Do. Mr Jos. Wedgwood & Miss A Willett dined.

 

Friday 17: Do. Engaged in the Grounds. Recommend teaching the children writing & Accounts.

 

Saturday 18: Do. Miss Fletchers came to Linley.

 

Sunday 19: Do. Mr Bent dined. Long conversation relative to the Brewery &c

 

Monday 20: At Burslem. returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. Mr Fritche came to dinner; In the afternoon Miss Fletchers left us.

 

Wednesday 22: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting for balloting for Supplementary Militia Sr. Jno Chetwode St Jno. Heathcote Mr Steadman & self. Returned to dinner. Mr Hassell & Mr Shuttleworth relative to the completion of the Rochdale Canal & who dined with us. Subscribed 10 p Cent on my shares & consented for A Caldwell. After dinner Musick. Alcock & his son & Mr Fritche.

 

Thursday 23: A day of Musick: much of it very good & going off well. Alcock & his son left us about eleven at night.

 

Friday 24: Mr Fritche left us about 12. Mr Penlington on his affairs. Engaged Letter writing.

 

Saturday 25: In the morning Mr Morris relative to the intended road over Packhorse farm, when I finally offered to use my influence with Mr Penlingtons creditors to leave the whole business throughout, both which related to taking away the license & making the road, to Mr Borth. On asking Mr Morris in

 

Page 249  June 1803

 

whom the new road had originated whether in the Trustees on the behalf of the Public, or in Mr Wilbraham, he replied certainly in Mr Wilbraham who had applied to the Commrs. for their consent & ever to make the road at his own expense. After we parted, Mr Morris returned, and said, that as he had understood me to enquire whether his application came from Mr Wilbraham, he desired to say that it did not, to which I replied that if that was the case I could not with propriety send any message to Mr Wilbraham, but Mr Morris was at Liberty to state what had passed between himself and me as a private conversation, by way of apprizing Mr Wilbraham of my sentiments. Of the result Mr Morris promised addl. information for my . . .

 

Sunday 26: Mr Penlington & his son dined. Engaged receiving Mr P rents. At home.

 

Monday 27: Do. Miss Wedgwood & Miss A Willett dined. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 28: At Stone attending Navig. Committee Meeting, returned at night. Miss W & Miss Willett gone. 

 

Wednesday 29: Mr Cox & Mr Penlington. At Newcastle races. slept at Mr Bents. Long conversation with Mr Tomlinson relative to the Cause between the Burton O. & Wedgwood & Byerly respecting bad flint supplied by the former, in which a new trial had been obtained when I promised to peruse & consider the Brief & Case.

 

Thursday 30: Do, returned at night.

 

July, Friday 1: At home. In the evening Mt Atkinson & Mr Wm Garnett

 

Saturday 2: Engaged with the Gentlemen who dined and afterwards left us. Received Brief from Mr Tomlinson. which perused.

 

Sunday 3: Mr & Mrs Wm Bent dined bringing Eliza. In the evening read again the Brief. Question important: but appearing to be mistated(sic) by the Judge (Graham)

 

Page 250  July 1803

 

Monday 4: At home. Engaged perusing papers relative to the affairs of the late Mr Jno. Child on the reference of which I am to meet Mr Bairtrigge at Cheadle on Wednesday. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 5: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting swearing in supplementary Militia. Col. Elliott, Messrs Bowys, Whitworth, Steadman & self. Fatiguing day & detained till near nine o Clock when I set off to Cheadle. Engaged there till very late with Mr Brandon examining papers, Bills &c. preparatory to the business of the next day.

 

Wednesday 6: Engaged all day very closely on the reference: which was conducted satisfactorily to both parties: each expressing themselves in warm & strong terms towards me. Certainly a difficult & disagreeable business, & such as it was highly proper shd. be sincerely settled.

 

Thursday 7: Engaged till noon settling various particulars & giving instructions for the Award. To Newcastle, dined with Mr Sparrow Mr Heathcote Sneyd &c at the half yearly Club dinner. In the evening returned home, but much fatigued.

 

Friday 8: At home. Engaged on various matters all day.

 

Saturday 9: At Trentham again attending Lieutenancy Meeting Col Sneyd Mr Mainwaring, Steadman & self. Returned in the Evening. Eliza Miss Potts & Hannah dined at . . .[Maer]. on return from whence William had a fall from his horse & broke his finger

 

Sunday 10: At home. Mr Cox relative to the dispute with Mr Wilbraham.

 

Monday 11: Do. Mr Cox again. Mr Tomlinson all morning relative to the Cause to be tried at Leicester, perusing & considering Brief. Mr Blunt came to dinner.

 

Tuesday 12: At home. Writing long letter to Mr Bate relative to the Applicn. threatened to be made by Mr Wilbraham to the Sessions he having declined all my proposals of reference. Mr Wood & Mr Chaure with the Award on Childs affairs - examining Accts. &c. & executed the Award. Mr Penlington on various matters. Alcock.

 

Page 251  July 1803

 

Wednesday 13: [no entry]

 

Thursday 14: [no entry]

 

Friday 15: At home. Mr Gilbert & Mr Bill called

 

Saturday 16: At Burslem. afterwards dined with Mr Gilbert. In the Evening Houghton arrived.

 

Sunday 17: At home. Bent dined. In the Evening Mr & Mrs Skerrett arrived on their annual visit.

 

Monday 18: Do.

 

Tuesday 19: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting, Began to mow.

 

Wednesday 20: At home. Engaged. Hay & harvest &c.

 

Thursday 21: Miss Stanford & Miss Pots left us. At home.

 

Friday 22: At Newcastle. returned by Bradwall. Engaged with Houghton and the Essays.

 

Saturday 23: At home. Messrs Gilbert, Sneyd, Sparrow & Bent dined. Houghton in the Evening said that he had received the following short method of finding the probable duration of life from a very . . . Calculator . . .

Subtract the age of the party from 86 & half the residue will be the probable duration for instance if the party be of the age of 50 the probability of life is 18 years.

                                         86

                           Subtract 50

                          Divide 2)36

                                         18

 

Sunday 24: At home.

 

Monday 25: Do, Engaged in the Hay Harvest. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 26: At Trentham attending first Lieutenancy Meeting under the Army of Reserve Act. Sr. Jno. Chetwode F Fletcher J G Heathcote Messrs Mainwaring, Col Sneyd, Cogney, Powys, Whitworth Steadman & self. Laborious & fatiguing day. Extreme heat. Returned to dinner at Linley abt. 7 in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 27: In the Morning called upon Mr Lawton who was from home. Engaged in the Harvest; but much overcome with the fatigue of yesterday. Writing Letter to Mr Tomlinson on the Leicester Cause.

 

Page 252  July 1803

Thursday 28: Attending Public Meeting at Burslem relative to forming a Volunteer Corps. In the Chair. Framing Resolutions &c. &c. Great heat & fatigue. Returned to dinner. In the Evening Houghton left us on his road to Manchester. Much previous Conversation relative to the wish of Mr Dickinson & his other affairs & an affectionate parting. Eliza with Mr & Mrs Skerrett went to Newearth.

 

Friday 29: Engaged attending Haymakers. Mr & Mrs Watkiss of Wheelock Mr & Mrs Walthall & Mr Bent dined.

 

Saturday 30: Framing plan of a Volunteer Corps which I proposed raising & cloathing (sic). Engaged on various other matters.

 

Sunday 31: At home. Service usual. Miss Lawrence with Edwd. Crompton came to dinner. In the afternoon attending Meeting at Audley for making returns for Carts, horses &c. which was unanimously attended, & my offer of a Corps of Volunteers very well received. Drank tea at Mr Hickins. Mr Hickin in the course of conversation observed that the parish of Audley according to the late Census, contained about 4000 inhabitants, & that the population in an average was 7 to a House. Edwd. Crompton & the 2 Miss Lawrences came in the morning.

 

August, Monday 1: At home Engaged all morning with Mr Skerrett on various matters. Alcock. In the evening Mr Skerrett left us.

 

Tuesday 2: At Trentham attending Ballot for the army of reserve. On my return dined at Mr Kinnersleys. At the Meeting received a very handsome Letter from Mrs Tollett desiring me to raise & clothe at her expense 35 Men to be added to my 25 in

 

Page 253  September 1803

 

order to make a compleat(sic) Company of 60, the whole to be under my direction, or the same amount to be applied to any other plan that I might approve. Called at Mr Walthalls.

 

Wednesday 3: Mrs Skerrett returned accompanied by Eliza & Mary. At home. Engaged closely all  morning reading & considering the Act lately proposed for the defence of the Country and making very long extracts therefrom, to enable me to mature the plan for the Volunteers. Jno. Alcock came to dinner. In the Evening Eliza returned with Emma. In the evening answered Mrs Tolletts letter.

 

Thursday 4: Engaged again all morning drawing up Statement of the advantages of serving in Volunteer Corps, & the preferableness of this service to the Class service under the Act. Mr Keys. In the Evening Mr Gardiner relative to the Volunteer Corps when it was thought advisable that a short statement of the Volunteer & Class Service should be placed upon the Church Door the ensuing Sunday for the information of the Neighbourhood. Boudarde & Mr Scott returning the Testament.

 

Friday 5: In the morning engaged drawing such statement and on various other matters closely. At home all day. 

 

Saturday 6: Mr Wm Bent dined. In the afternoon went up for the first time at Talk on the Hill when in a very short time 22 enrolled themselves which with 3 more who had promised to join made up my own Compliment compleat. Capn. Halliday who had accommodated me with a dream, & had obligingly ridden down, pronounced them the finest set of men he had seen. He & Bent supped; and so commenced my military career.

 

Sunday 7: At home

 

Monday 8: Do. Jno. Alcock dined. In the afternoon went to Audley parading when the number of Volunteers increased to 41.

 

Page 254  September 1803

 

Tuesday 9: Went to Trentham early & engaged all day at Lieutenancy Meeting, swearing in the Army of Reserve. A very laborious and fatiguing day. No appearance of any scarcity of Men, Money or Spirit. 20 Gns. the genl. price of a substitute; but 25 were asked.

 

Wednesday 10: At Burslem, attending a Meeting relative to the Volunteers, & afterwards attending the Enrolment, when upwards of 260 enrolled themselves. Many had put down their names before, so that the whole number today was supposed to be about 400. Out of the 260 whom I enrolled, I found on looking over the roll that 126 were unmarried Men of the age of 17 & under 30 years. Great appearances of loyalty & good will amongst the Men, & . . .[outright?] hatred of the French mission.

 

Thursday 11: Went to Stafford to attend as a special Juror in a Cause of Griffin & Beech, & also to attend a General Lieutenancy Meeting appointed to be held tomorrow. David privately with Mr Tho. Hill, J W Leigh. In the Evg. engaged with Peake & Mr Jervis.

 

Friday 12: Attending Lieutenancy Meeting very numerous and respectable; and afterwards attending & sworn in on the cause, but which was at length agreed to be referred. Returned in the Evening & found that Mr Fletcher had called, & proposed raising a joint Corps of Audley & Betley Volunteers.

 

Saturday 13: Finding that an Enrollment(sic) in writing had been sent into the Parish for Corps of Audley & Betley Volunteers, & that some of the persons who had enrolled with me might be thrown into an unpleasant situation, as well as uneasiness arise in the Parish if two parties were

 

Page 255  September 1803

 

found I determined to sacrifice spirit to propriety and to release the persons who had enrolled with me, & have them at liberty to act as they should now judge best: & which I accordingly carried into effect at the Muster this Evening. In the course of the day Mr Cox & Mr Martin, relative to the park Lease proposed to be made to the former by Mr Lawton.

 

Sunday 14: Writing long letter to Mr Fletcher on the business of the Volunteers. At home.

 

Monday 15: Mr Fletcher & Mr Harding called to urge my taking Command of the Audley Corps. Engaged all morning closely, writing, and arranging various matters which the late great hurry of engagements had prevented my attending to. In the evening rode to Wheelock to call on Mr Bagley: but he was nor within. Called at the Watkins; & the Furnivalls.

 

Tuesday 16: At Burslem attending a Meeting of the Inhabitants relative to the Burslem Volunteers. In the Chair. Drawing up resolutions &c. a copy of which I was requested to transmit to Col. Sneyd. Returned to dinner, oppressed with heat & fatigue. In the afternoon engaged copying Resolution &c.

 

Wednesday 17: At home. Engaged on various matters particularly in writing Letter to Col. Sneyd at Windsor with the Burslem Resolutions.

 

Thursday 18: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting. Receiving Constable Lists of Inhabitants under the Defence Act. & swearing in Army of Reserve. Lord Granville Levison Sr. Jno. Chetwode Mr Fletcher. J Heathcote & ors. Staid to dinner with Mr Steadman & Lieut. Holliday having much business that of the Army of Reserve being taken by Mr Steadman & self.

 

Friday 19: At home. Sr. Tho. & Lady Fletcher & family & Mr & Mrs Sneyd of Darlaston dined

 

Saturday 20: At Betley. Dining with Sr. Tho. Fletcher. Much conversation relative to the Volunteers &c. Declined taking any Command from the great purpose of business already on my hands; being fully as much as my time or health would allow me to get through.

 

Sunday 21: At home. Much indisposed with a bad cold.

 

Monday 22: Do. Do. Alcock. Closely engaged in settling private accounts &c. 

 

Tuesday 23: At home in consequence of my cold which prevented my dining at Mrs Tollets, which I was engaged to do. Began cutting Oats in the square field adjoining Barlows land.

 

Wednesday 24: Do. At Newcastle Eliza accompany(sic) me on horseback. Drank tea at Basford.

 

Thursday 25: Mr & Mrs Hickin Mr Halliday & Mr Bent dined.

 

Friday 26: At Burslem in consequence of a Letter received last night from Lord Uxbridge notifying the acceptance of the Burslem Volunteers when I appointed a Meeting to be held on Monday next for the choice of Officers.

 

Saturday 27: At Betley calling on Mrs Tollet, Sr. Tho. Fletcher & Mr Broughton returned late to dinner.

 

Page 257  September 1803

 

Sunday 28: In the morning Mr Bent relative to a request being sent to the Lord Lieutant. proposing & desiring the appointment of Lord Grenville Levison to be  Brigade officer in this district of the County, when I promised to call in the morning on Mr Gilbert & Mr Carthill to obtain their signatures.

 

Monday 29: Called on Mr Gilbert & Mr Carthill. From thence to Newcastle attending with Mr Steadman on the reference Adams of Chiffory. Dined with Mr S at Mr Bents. From thence to Burslem attending a very numerous Meeting, when officers appointed for the Volunteer Corps. Detained till late.

 

Tuesday 30: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting. Swearing Army of Reserve & receiving Returns of  Arms under the Defence Act, On my return in the Evening, having been detained at Newcastle writing Letters to Lord Uxbridge & Col. Sneyd . . . the Burslem Resolutions, found Mr Gaskell & Miss Stamford.

 

Wednesday 31: At home engaged with Mr Gaskell. Alcock & his son. Musick.

 

September, Thursday 1: Do. Do. Carrying Oats Miss Harwood came to dinner. Engaged with the party. Stamford killed a brace of Birds & a Leveret.

 

Page 258  September 1803

 

Friday 2: At home. looking over papers &c. previous to attending in reference tomorrow in the two Actions Coombes v Lloyd referred to me. & also engaged with Mr G.

 

Saturday 3: On my road to Newcastle met Mr Tollets steward with a message desiring my assistance in a dispute with the Tenant of the . . .[Lindy] Harbour Estate respecting Titles taken in kind. when I called & settled the matter. From thence to the factory reviewing the premises in dispute in Coombes & Lloyd. Attending all morning & till late in the afternoon taking long examinations of witnesses at the Roebuck in both Causes & also attending Mr Steadman relative to our Award in the matter of Adams of Chiffory. Afterwards with Mr Bent relative to Lord Grenville

Lewisons appointment as Brigade officer to the volunteer Corps. Declined dining at Basford & returned home between 5 & 6. Mrs Byerley & Miss Byerley to tea. Letter from Dr. Carrie relative to Dr Valfy's School at Reading.

 

Sunday 4: At home. In the afternoon Miss Harwood & Bessy left us.

 

Monday 5: At Stoke in pursuance of a request from Mr Steadman to attend swearing in the Volunteers, & engaged on that business till late in the Evening.

 

Tuesday 6: At Trentham with Mr Gaskell.

 

Wednesday 7: At Burslem from thence to Hanley attending with Mr Steadman swearing in the Hanley & Sholton Volunteers & from thence to Etruria swearing in the Etruria Volunteers. Dined with the Officers at the Swan.

 

Page 259  September 1803

Thursday 8: At Newcastle dining with Mr Hollins.

 

Friday 9: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

Saturday 10: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting Mr Steadman & self, Returned to dinner. Mr & Mrs W Bent Miss Gortons & Mr Blunt dined. The two Heatherly came with Stamford.

 

Sunday 11: At home. Wrote to Mr Fletcher on the subject of the Betley & Audley Volunteers & subscribed for Miss Stamford & myself £50. Mr Jones with a certificate previous to his applying to the Magistrate for a Licence to keep a public house at Hanley. Letter from Mr Wood requesting me to attend tomorrow Evening to swear in Burslem Volunteers.

 

Monday 12: At Newcastle breakfasted with Mr Bent. Afterwards engaged with Mr Sparrow on the reference of the . . .[events] between the late Mr Child Mr Swinnerton &c. From thence to Ballerton but Mr Swinnerton out. Returned to Newcastle & dined with Mr Bent & advising relative to Mr Lonsdales Affairs from thence to Burslem by appointment swearing in the Volunteers.

 

Tuesday 13: At home. Mr Cox with Mr Lanterns Settlement relative to the power of making &ldots; Mr Fletcher relative to the insertion in the Stafford paper of the Subscription to the Betley & Audley Corps of Volunteers. Engaged on various other matters.

 

Wednesday 14: At home. Do. In the house all day. Engaged with the Girls writing. Looked over Cox's Tour in Monmouthshire. Mr Lawtons settlement.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mr Edwd. Earsley relative to the reference to Mr Sparrow & myself of Child & Swinnertons Accts & also relative to the sale to Wm Bennett of Mr E share in Lands.

 

Page 256  September 1893

 

& Buildings at Chesleton. Afterwards Mr Bennett on the same business the final settlement of which the Parties referred to me. Perusing sundry papers relative thereto.

 

Friday 16: Went to Darlaston to dine & stay all night. Sr. Tho & Lady Fletcher Rev W & Mrs Bayley of Harbury Mrs Hatrell & Mrs Meeke.

 

Saturday 17: Returned home to dinner. Having on the way called at Bullerton where engaged a long time with Mr Swinnerton on various matters relating to his affairs particularly Childs Reference. Purchase in Monmouthshire. Application to Mr Gilbert &c.

 

Sunday 18: At home.

 

Monday 19: At Newcastle fair. Brewery &c. Returned to dinner. This morning Hannah & Eliza set out on a Journey into Dorsetshire.

 

Tuesday 20: At home. Fine rain. the weather which had been uncommonly dry for the last 2 or 3 months, in so much that great inconvenience sustained in many parts of the neighbourhood from the want of water, & the failure of the Grass, appearing to break. Engaged with the children writing &c.

The soul, according to the Hypothesis of Hirder in his Philosophy of the History of Man, is a combination of indestructible powers acting indestructible organs; and the powers are completely distinct from the organs, capable of subsisting apart from these instruments, and of combining with and acting  by others, and different in their nature. It appears that the Deity, on the dissolution of the present system of organs, will place the soul (or system of powers, in a new system of organs, which will less incumber(sic) its operations, and allow to its development and activity far greater scope.

 

Wednesday 21 [no entry]

 

Page 257  September 1803

 

Thursday 22: At Burslem from thence to Newcastle calling on Dr Northern. Mr Blunt returned with me to Linley. Long conversation relative to Stamford when finally I determined that he shall remain with Mr B till his going to Cambridge the latter end of the next year. In the mean time Mr Blunt promised to take him to Cambridge at Christmas next to be examined & to enter him.

 

Friday 23: Mr Bent came to dinner pleasant & agreeable day. Blunt returned with him in the Evening.

 

Saturday 24: At Burslem again.

 

Sunday 25: At home as usual. wrote to Mr Wood.

 

Monday 26: At Stone attending Genl. Assembly of Navign. Went from Newcastle with Mr Sparrow in his Gig.

 

Tuesday 27: Returned from Stone in the Evg.

 

Wednesday 28: At home. Engaged on the farm.

 

Thursday 29: Do. Boudarde.

 

Friday 30: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Agricultural Society as President. The first prize being a Silver Cup or 7 guineas adjudged to me for laying down with white clover & Grass seeds in the best & clearest manner. This is the piece before the house. Returned in the Evening. Mr Watkiss with the will of Mrs Steadman.

 

October, Saturday 1: At home. Engaged on various matters. In the evening Mr Wm. Cox.

 

Sunday 2: At home. Perused & considered the Will of Mrs Steadman in which I was nominated a Trustee.

 

Monday 3: At Burslem. Returned early. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 4: Mr Waring called. At Blurton with Mr Blunt looking over his planting & improvements & much conversation relative to Stamford. Returned to Newcastle to dinner with Mr Smith whose Mayoralty expired this day. Called on Mrs Watkiss.

 

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Wednesday 5: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Thursday 6: At Newcastle meeting Mr Robinson of Stone & the Parties finally settling & making my Award in the matter between the Navign. Co. & Mr Valentine Close relative to the damages sustained by the latter by the breaking down of the Bagnall reservoir, which had been materially referred to  me.

 

Friday 7: Dined at Basford

 

Saturday 8: At home.

 

Sunday 9: At Newcastle early attending the Mayor to Church as Recorder. dined & attended him again in the afternoon & returned in the Evening.

 

Monday 10: At Cobridge in consequence of a promise which I had made to use my endeavours in the Cobridge Corps of Volunteer Infantry in consequence of some accusations of improper & disloyal expressions having been used by Mr W Stevenson one of the Officers. Called upon Mr Warburton Mr . . . Mr Billington & put the matter in a train . . . properly sorted. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 11: At home. Engaged on the farm. Any fact or observation tending to facilitate practical humanity will be noticed by those who wish to lessen the unnecessary sufferings of animal nature;  also endued with feeling or reflection would not wish to do it?

Eels and fish of all kinds it is said may be instantaneously killed

 

Page 259  October 1803

by an incision being made with a sharp pointed penknife, or punctures with a bodkin, longitudinally, into the brain, about half an inch, or an inch above the eyes, according to the size of the fish.

Mr Morris for leave to get Stone for his wharf, which I question. 

 

Wednesday 12: In the morning Mr Jones late of Newcastle, advising relative to his being billeted for the Army of Reserve - Mr Bennett - relative to the Title & Conveyance to an Estate at Chesleton perusing bill & Deeds, & advising him thereon. Mr Penlington relative to notice given to pay in money due to the Exrs. of Mrs Taylor, & also relative to the fresh Lease of . . .[Tenalwoods] Estate & perusing & settling the Drat. of such Lease. Children writing - Consultation of the will of Mrs Davies & advising thereon. Arranging various papers & Letters.

 

Thursday 13: At home. Boudarde.

 

Friday 14: At Newcastle examining & settling Brewery Accounts. Close day.

 

Saturday 15: Do. All day. Blunt dined at Mr Bents. Income tax. Returned in the evening.

 

Sunday 16: At home. Mr Wood came to dinner & staid all night. Flint mill & various other matters.

 

Monday 17: At Newcastle on the reference between Mr Twemlow & Capt. Simpson relative to a Pew in Hanley Chapel. . . . which Capt. Simpson to give 20 Gns. and a conveyance to be made. In the afternoon on the reference with Mr Tomlinson Halland & Close a disagreeable business adjourned not being able to get through the examination of the Witnesses.

 

Tuesday 18: At Newcastle again it being the Sessions dining with the Mayor.

 

Wednesday 19: At home. Frost(sic) day. Talk Chapel. Mr Hill & Mr Leigh returned with us.

 

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Thursday 20: In the morning went to Burslem to spend a day or two at Mr Woods, with Eliza & the children. In the Evening attacked with a complaint similar to that which I expended[? means experienced] at Liverpool 2 years ago. 

 

Friday 21: At Burslem very unwell.

 

Saturday 22: Do. Engaged on the arbitration Robinson & Taylor - afterwards Mr Warburton & Mr Stevenson relative to the weariness in the Cobridge Corps of Volunteers. In the Evening returned home. Complaint abated, Found the new Income Tax Act, & notice of my being appointed a Commr. to carry it into execut.

 

Sunday 23: At home. the following passage from "Le Music Frangnis" struck me as very forcibly exposing the folly & . . . . . . of the cropped Hair, which has of late so much prevailed                                                                                                        

"Hair is the chief ornament of Youth and Beauty; it is, as some person has observed, to the countenance that which herbs and flowers are to the fields, and leaves to the Trees. Let a female (says Apuleius) fall from heaven, or arise out of the ocean, surrounded by the fraces(sic), and accompanied by the Loves; let her be dressed also in the girdle of berries; if you despoil her of her hair, it is impossible that she should please, any more than her husband Vulcan."

Mr Gibbon relative to Mr Gilberts Corps of Volunteers. Fines &c.

 

Monday 24: At home. Engaged on various matters. perusing new Income Tax Act &c.

 

Tuesday 25: Do. Mr Swinnerton of Batterton on various matters. Note from Mr Wood of Brownhills for permission to sport. Mr Penlington & his Tenants receiving Rents. Mr P. & his Son dined. Mr Jones with Award in Robinson & Taylor.

 

Wednesday 26: At Newcastle. Notice of reference to be of dispute Cope & Janines on their separation in Trade. Returned to dinner. Great froz(sic).

 

Page 261  October 1803

Thursday 27: At home. Engaged in the Grounds. Boudarde. in the Evg. Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 28: Do. Do. In the Evening unwell

 

Saturday 29: At Audley meeting Sr. Jno Chetwode & Sr. Tho. Fletcher taking the oath as a Commr. & making arrangements for carrying into execution the new Income Act. From thence to Maer Hall  calling on Mr Wedgwood, but he was from home. Stopped at Bullerton and dined with Mr Swinnerton.

In the morning met Sr. John & Mr Heathcote who were arriving to make a call at Linley Wood.

 

Sunday 30: At home. Unwell.

 

Monday 31: Do. Engaged on various matters. Plantations. Alcock. In the morning Stamford shot a beautiful Cock Pheasant in Swallow Moor. In the morning Mr Jones with the awards in Robinson & Lockett and Swinnerton Brandon & others; the former of which I executed. Mr Hardings Messenger with Notices to the Assessors of Townships in Pirehill North of Meeting on the 9th, to be signed, and which I signed accordingly being 89 in number.

 

November, Tuesday 1: At home. In the Evening Miss Hanford & Eliza returned out of Dorsetshire.

 

Wednesday 2: At Newcastle settling & closing the years Brewery Accts. Engaged close all day but returned in the Evening & found Mrs & Miss Peake.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Engaged in the Grounds & on the Farm. Boudarde.

 

Friday 4: At Lawton attending the annual dinner called the Mayor's . . . office . . . A full Meeting & Mr Sparrow consented to preside the ensuing year.

 

Saturday 5: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Sunday 6: Do. Mr Hill called & dined. In the Evening received a Letter from Col. Sneyd informing me that the King & the Commander in Chief had expressed in very strong terms.

 

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their approbation of my own Conduct & that of the Burslem Volunteers relative to their Non  acceptance of their Services, which from Col. Sneyds Letter appeared to have originated on some mistake, the Lord Lieutenant of the County that he had himself understood them to be accepted.

 

Monday 7: At Burslem communicating to the Officers of the Volunteers the Letter which I had received from Col. Sneyd, when it was thought proper that a public Meeting should be called the next morning in order that the same might be made known to the Inhabitants, & which I promised to attend. Much rain & wet both in going & returning. Alcock. In the morning Mrs & Miss Peake left us.

 

Tuesday 8: At Burslem again attending Meeting accordingly & explaining the whole business, together with the Correspondence between Lord Uxbridge, Col. Sneyd & myself & which seemed to give great satisfaction. Returned to dinner, Mr Atkinson Mr Bourne Mr Tho Garnett & Ann came to dinner & the Gentlemen staid all night.

 

Wednesday 9: At Madely attending Meeting of Commrs. under the Income Act. Sr. Jno Chetwode Sr. Tho. Fletcher & self swearing in & delivering Introductions to Assessors. Returned late to dinner. In the Evening engaged writing again to Col. Sneyd relative to the Volunteers & in reply to his Letter.

 

Thursday 10: At home. Boudarde. In the Evening Mr Keys

 

Friday 11: Do. Engaged perusing various papers &c. relative to the Reference Chiffney & Adams, & Swinnerton & Gallimore in which I had engaged to attend tomorrow at Newcastle. Also perusing & correcting the Account in Swinnerton & Child, which had been reinstated by Mr Sparrow, previous to executing the Account. In the afternoon Mr Scarlet relative to Chiffney & Adams.

 

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Saturday 12: At Newcastle on the several References, but Mr Steadman did not attend. Taking examinations of Mr . . . in Swinnerton & Gallimore - Adjusting Account Swinnerton & Child &c. &c. Returned to dinner. In the Evening wrote to Mr Bicknell relative to the petition for payment of the Costs in Robins business.

 

Sunday 13: At home.

 

Monday 14: At Newcastle meeting Mr Steadman on the reference Chiffney & Adams. Executed the Award in Swinnerton & others & Brandon & others.  Returned to dinner. Alcock who staid all night. Musick.

 

Tuesday 15: At home. Engaged on the Farm &c. 

 

Wednesday 16: Do. In the morning a very heavy snow - Miss Bent & Miss Godley came to diner. 

 

Thursday 17: Do. Engaged in various matters. Boudarde.

 

Friday 18: Do. Settling & examining private Accts &c.

 

Saturday 19: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 20: Do. Mr Wm Bent & Mr Tho. Bent came to dinner the latter staid all night.

 

Monday 21: Do. Alcock. Musick.

 

Tuesday 22: Do.

 

Wednesday 23: At Burslem. Miss Bent & Miss Godley left Linley.

 

Thursday 24: At home. Engaged on various matters. Boudarde.

 

Friday 25: Mr & Mrs Wedgwood Mrs Bent Mrs Flemming Mr & Mrs W Bent Mr T Bent & Miss Bent & Miss Godley dined. Mr & Mrs W staid all night.

 

Saturday 26: Mr & Mrs W left us before dinner.

 

Sunday 27: At home. received sundry papers from Mr Sparrow relative to Talk in the Hill Chapel.

 

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Monday 28: At Newcastle meeting Mr Tomlinson again on the reference Halland & Close, which we went through, & made our Award being detained till late.

 

Tuesday 29: At home. In the Evening Mr Skerrett came

 

Wednesday 30: Do. Engaged with Mr S

 

December, Thursday 1: Do. In the forenoon Mr S left us.

 

Friday 2: Do. Mr & Mrs Wood & some of the young people came to dinner.

 

Saturday 3: Do. Engaged with Mr Wood on various matters. 

 

Sunday 4: At Talk Chapel. Delivered to Mr Hill the papers relating to the Chapel which I had received from Mr T Sparrow

 

Monday 5: At Newcastle on various matters. Appointed with Mr Bent to accompany him into Lancashire on various matters of business, & to set off on Thursday morning.

 

Tuesday 6: At home. Mr Wood who had gone home yesterday returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 7: Mr & Mrs Wood &c. left us. Engaged on various matters previous to leaving home. In the evening Bent arrived.

 

Thursday 8: Set off with Bent in a postchaise. Arrived at Mrs Sandfords to dinner. Met Mr & Mrs Hardman. Conversation with the former relative to Mr Hardley &c. Afterwards attended a Subscription Concert & spent the Evening at Mr Wm Hardmans at his particular study to hear Mrs Molyneaux &c. & had some delightful Musick. In a conversation after dinner on the late restriction on wetting Barley in the Couch, in Malting, suggested the expedient of doing it by steam: a thought which both deemed worth consideration & experiment.

 

Page 265  December 1803

Friday 9: Left Manchester about 12 oClock & got to Liverpool that night.

 

Saturday 10: Engaged in business till about one oClock when we set off homewards & got to Knutsford. Called on Mrs Lockett &c

 

Sunday 11: Arrived home to dinner. Bent left us in the afternoon.

 

Monday 12: At Newcastle settling return to be made from the Brewery under the Income Act. &c.

 

Tuesday 13: At home. Engaged on the farm. Mr Johnson relative to Income Tax.

 

Wednesday 14: Do.

 

Thursday 15: Storm of snow. Miss Hollins Alcock Fritche & J Alcock together with Miss Bent & Miss Godley came to dinner & a Musick party. Pleasant evening & much good Musick.

 

Friday 16:  Miss . . . & Mr Hollins dined. The latter staid all night

 

Saturday 17: At Burslem. Mr Wood returned from Liverpool

 

Sunday 18: At home.

 

Monday 19: At Trentham attending Meeting of Commrs. for receiving Returns under the Income Act. Sir Jno. Chetwode Tho. Fletcher J Heathcote & self. Cold wet stormy day. much wet & fatigued, not returning till late at night.

 

Tuesday 20: At home,. Mr Penlington - Mr Turner on the reference to me as Umpire of deficits with Mr Cope

 

Wednesday 21: Do. Engaged on the farm. Alcock.

 

Thursday 22: Do. Mr Blunt relative to the intended journey of himself & Stamford to Cambridge and engaged in long conversation on the subject of education & the future plan to be adopted in respect to Stamford. Determined for them to set off to Cambridge on Monday next & return by the way of London. Boudarde.

 

Page 266  December 1803

 

Friday 23: At Burslem on various matters relative to the . . .[harmfeting] &c. & much conversation with Mr Wood relative to the present imprecedential & general Stagnation of . . .[Teade]

 

Saturday 24: At Newcastle attending on the umpirage of disputes between Cope & Timmis & the points in difference between Messrs. Plant & Goastrey the Arbitrators all morning. Brewery. Returned to Burslem to speak to Mr Wood relative to altering Return under the Income Act &c. returned late to dinner.

 

Sunday 25: At home.

 

Monday 26: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Commissrs. on the Income Act. Finally settled Cope & Timmis business. Returned late.

 

Tuesday 27: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

Wednesday 28: Do.

 

Thursday 29: At Newcastle dining at the Club. In the morning at the Brewery, & with Mr Bent of Basford relative to his acting as Deputy Lieutenant.

 

Friday 30: At home.

 

Thursday 31: At Burslem on various matters. In the Evening received a Letter from Stamford at Cambridge.

 

Page 267 January 1803

 

1804

January, Sunday 1: At home.

 

Monday 2: At Longton calling upon Sir John Heathcote. Returned to dinner. Brewery

Tuesday 3: set off on our annual visit to Nantwich.

 

Wednesday 4 to Friday 13 [bracketed together and labelled] At Nantwich.

 

Friday 13: . . . [Brapian - should this be Prussian] Blue, burnt terra sienna will supply a Pallet in . . .[bil] colours without red. P. Bayley.

 

Saturday 14: Eliza & I, with Emma & Louisa retd. from Nantwich

 

Sunday 15: At home.

 

Monday 16: Do. Engaged on the farm also copying & correcting Houghton's Essays. 

 

Tuesday 17: At Newcastle attending the Mayor at dinner it being the Sessions. Dined at the Roebuck & returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 18: At home engaged looking over Accounts &c.

 

Thursday 19: At Newcastle at the Brewery: & paying sundry Bills in the Inn also making arrangements for the Mayor &c dining at Linley  Wood on Saturday 28th.

 

Friday 20: At home. Engaged on the farm &c.

 

Saturday 21: I this day entered the 45th year of my age

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: At Newcastle on various matters. Mt Blunt returned with me to dinner.

 

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Tuesday 24: Coursing with Mr Blunt, Gibbons &c. Saw four hares & killed one.

 

Wednesday 25: Mr Blunt left us with whom I had much satisfactory conversation relative to Stamford & his plans at Cambridge at which University he is now entered of St. John's College.

 

Thursday 26: At Trentham attending Meeting of Commrs. under the Income Act. Sr. Jno. Chetwode, Sr. Jno. Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Very wet day & returned to a late dinner at six oClock much fatigued.

 

Friday 27: At home Engaged with the workmen in the Meadow which we had begun to float.

 

Saturday 28: At home. Messrs. Fenton, R Fenton, Sneyd, Northern, Spode, Sparrow, Bent, Hill, Swinnerton, Nicksson dined. Application from Mr Fourchiquour [JC spells this name in several different ways.  As this is the most common of all the spellings I have used it throughout] relative to instructing the Children in french.

 

Sunday 29: At home.

 

Monday 30: Do. but stormy day.

 

Tuesday 31: At Burslem with Eliza & Stamford. Found Mr Skerrett there who was putting up a new engine on the Bycars for raising the Coals on Mr Trevithicks principle.[Richard Trevithick's high pressure steam engine. This may have been one of the first of these type of engines built as much of Trevithicks high pressure work dates from around 1803 to 1804] Attended dinner. Mr Booth called.

 

February, Wednesday 1: At home engaged in the ground planting &c. In the afternoon Stamford returned to Mr Blunts.

 

Thursday 2: At Trentham attending Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting for receiving Constables Militia returns & hearing appeals. Sr. Jno. Chetwode & self attended early & got through a good deal of business. Afterwards joined by Messrs Mainwaring Whitworth, Spode & Steadman. Mr Tollett also just called in.

 

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Swore in Messrs. Gilbert, Kenright & Steadman as additional commissioners under the Income Act, & returned home to a late dinner having declined an invitation from Mr Mainwaring to dine with Sir Jno. Chetwode at Whitmore.

 

Friday 3: At home. Writing Letter to Mr Broughton. Engaged in the grounds. Mr Wood came to dinner. Conversation relative to proposals made by the Burton flint Co. the new engine &c. &c.

 

Saturday 4: At home.

 

Sunday 5: Do.

 

Monday 6: Do. Engaged on the farm.

 

Tuesday 7: At Newcastle with Eliza on horseback on various matters.

 

Wednesday 8: At home. Engaged on the farm & in the grounds

 

Thursday 9: Do. Miss Stamford returned from Knutsford

 

Friday 10: Do.

 

Saturday 11: Do.

 

Sunday 12: Do. Engaged planting &c.

 

Monday 13: At Newcastle on various matters - stating Account with Mr Bent relative to Rents &c of Dwellinghouse on the Marsh previous to my finally settling the same with Mr Beckett. Alcock. In the Evening wrote to Mr Rowley & offered to purchase the grounds with Mrs Johnson at a price to be fixed by Mr Henshall.

 

Tuesday 14:  At home. Engaged in the grounds

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Engaged on the Farm

 

Thursday 16: At Trentham attending Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting Sir John Chetwode Mr Mainwaring Steadman & self. Dined at the Roebuck on my return & conversation with Mr Kinnersley relative to Mr Suttons Title, which he was desirous me finally to arrange for him.

 

Friday 17: At home.

 

Saturday 18: At Aslburg calling upon Mr Hepingstall, making enquiries relative to Mr Fourchiquour, previous to engaging him as a French Tutor.

 

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Sunday 19: At home. Confined with a bad cold.

 

Monday 20: At Newcastle on a reference which had been made to me by Mr Thos. Cartwright of Nantwich by Mr Beckett relative to the Claim set up by the former to some buildings in the back lane & receiving the same with Mr Tho. Yoxall previous to making an Award. Returned to dinner, Alcock.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. Messr. Furnival, Wm Bent, John Swinnerton & Walthall, with the Ladies dined. In the morning Mr Hodgson of Congleton called.

 

Wednesday 22: Do. Mr Cox & Mr Bate. the former relative to the renewal of his Lease, when I advised the opinion of Mr Atherton to be taken, - the latter on a matter in dispute with his Uncle - John Walter relative to his Tithe to Lands purchased from Barrons - John Oram relative to a Distress made on his Goods at Lane End - In the afternoon Mr Richd. Hollins with a request from his father (who had unexpectedly returned home from Buxton very ill, & was pronounced by his Physicians past all hope of recovery), that I would call upon him, as he wished to consult me on his affairs &c. In the forenoon Mr Penlington also called relative to an execution which had appeared against Smallwood one of the Tenants.

 

Thursday 23: At Newcastle from thence to Hanley attending Mr Hollins, who I found in a very dangerous state. Consulting with him on his affairs; when I thought it best for him to make a fresh will. Taking his instructions accordingly, & then went to Newcastle, where I proposed the same, & got it engrossed, & afterwards returned with it to Hanley, Mr Hollins & his family having expressed a wish that I would do so, & attended the executors. Returned home late

 

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much fatigued.

 

Friday 24: At home. In the morning Mr Fourchiquour whom I engaged to instruct the Children in French, & with whom engaged all the day as he staid to dinner. Mr F is an officer on half pay. I believe a Lieut. Col. He informed me that he had served as a Lieutenant in the same regiment as Buonaparte, who was at that time also a Lieut. He spoke of him as possessing boundless ambition, & thought his talents had been greatly exaggerated yet to use Mr F own expression "he is not a common Man."

 

Saturday 25: At Burslem. Severe day.

 

Sunday 26: At home. Sent to Mr Hill by Stanford the Copy of the Rental of Talk Chapel, which I had received from Mr Sparrow.

 

Monday 27: At home. Mr James Cox relative to his Leases under Mr Lawton - Bill of Certs. Cox Agt. &c. &c. Engaged on the farm. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 28: Wm. Wilson advising relative to a Will. At Newcastle attending Agricultural Society as President. Mr Offley . . . &c admitted members. Mr Paoli relative to John Walters Title to Lands at Audley.

 

Wednesday 29: At home. Engaged on the farm. Mr Wood dined.

 

Thursday 30: Mr Johnson relative to the dispute with Tolaright about the Coals &c when Wednesday next was appointed for a Meeting at the Legs of Man Burslem.

 

March, Thursday 1: At home. Engaged in Do. & various matters. Mr Keys

 

Friday 2: Do. In the house - unwell. John Walters relative to his Title.

 

Saturday 3: Do. Mr Wm, Hindley dined. Snow.

 

Sunday 4: Do.

 

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Monday 5: At Newcastle on various matters. Delivered to Mr Tho. Sparrow the Articles of Agreement between the Navign. Co. & Mr Hales &c. returned to dinner, bringing back Eliza from Basford.

 

Tuesday 6: At home. Writing again to Mr Rowley relative to the purchase of the But Lane Lands. At the Hollins with Mr Johnson to whom I delivered my Letter. Mr Fourchiquour being his first attendance on the Children.

 

Wednesday 7: Wilson again, relative to the Will, of which he had delivered me an Extract, when I desired to see a Copy of the whole previous to giving any positive Opinion. At Burslem, with Letter received last night from Mr Johnson requesting that the reference might be postponed. Viewing the new engine which had been erected on Mr Trevithicks improved plan. Appeared to work well. Returned to dinner & found the two Miss Woods.

 

Thursday 8: At home. Alcock.

 

Friday 9: Do. Mr Wood came to dinner, & staid all night.

 

Saturday 10: At Trentham attending Deputy Lieutenancy Meeting, for balloting for vacancies in the Militia & Army of Reserve. Sir John Chetwode, Messrs Steadman, Mainwaring, Spode Whalley & self. Returned home to a late dinner.

 

Sunday 11: At home.

 

Monday 12: At Newcastle on various matters. Received the first intelligence of the death of my old friend & acquaintance Hollins, of whom from the opportunities I had had of knowing his intentions & dispositions it may . . .said that he died as he had lived an honest Man.

 

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Tuesday  13: At home. engaged in the grounds. Mr Fourchiquour. 

 

Wednesday 14: At Burslem. Attending with Mr Johnson &c Reference Wood & Caldwell & Tolaright. Engaged all day & appointed Friday for proceeding further. Miss Woods returned.

 

Thursday 15: At home. Engaged in the grounds & planting &c at Oldcots. In the Evening Mr Keys.

 

Friday 16: At Burslem attending again on reference. Mr Johnson of Congleton breakfasted on his road, looked at the new engine which appeared to answer perfectly well. Engaged on reference all day & Tuesday 10th April fixed for the Arbitrators Mr John Martin of Norton, & Mr Edwd. Eardley to make their Award, & for that purpose to meet again at Burslem.

 

Saturday 17: At home. Considering Case under the Will of John Goodall & drawing opinion thereon. Afterwards engaged in the grounds.

 

Sunday 18: At Talk Chapel with Eliza & the Children. Received Summons to attend on the Grand Jury at the Assizes at Stafford on Wednesday next.

 

Monday 19: At home. Engaged in the grounds. Alcock. 

 

Tuesday 20: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting Sir Jno. Chetwode Messrs. Mainwaring Spode & self. Returned to Newcastle to have heard further witnesses on the Reference . . .[Cri..es] & Lloyd, but the parties did not attend.

 

Wednesday 21: At home. Engaged on various matters & in the grounds. 

 

Thursday 22: At Stafford with Stamford. Attended on the grand Jury & dined with the Judges. Sir Jno. Chetwode, foreman.

 

Friday 23: Discharged with the Grand Jury about one oClock. Dined at Stone with Messrs. Sparrow, Plant & T Fenton & got home in the Evening.

 

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Saturday 24: At home. Mr Wm Cox relative to Mr Lawton. Delivered to him the Settlement Deed made on the Marriage of Mr & Mrs Lawton which had been left in my possession & also Mr Cox's Lease.

 

Sunday 25: Do. Mr Wm Bent dined. Conversation on brewery Affairs &c.

 

Monday 26: At Burslem. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 27: At Newcastle attending Navign. Meeting - Returned to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 28: At home. Mr Beckett Mr Harding & Mr Fletcher surveying Coals in the Copyhold Lands, within the Manor of Audley, which Mr Meynell had determined to dispose of.

 

Thursday 29: Do. Engaged on the farm & on various matters. In the Evening Mr Funnaly.

 

Friday 30: Do.

 

Saturday 31: Do.

 

April, Sunday 1: Mr Hill. Afterwards at Bradwall dining with O Sneyd to have met Mr Offley Crewe, but he was prevented from coming. Sparrow, Bent & Poole.

 

Monday 2: At home. Mr Wm Cox - Mr Penlington - Miss Bent & Miss . . .[haria] to dinner.

 

Tuesday 3: So. Engaged on the farm, &c. Mr Nigel Heathcote to dinner.

 

Wednesday 4: At Lawton attending the funeral of the late Mr Lawton as a Pall Bearer.

 

 Thursday 5: Mr Blunt came to dinner. Perusing & correcting Houghtons Essays & the alterations I made to them.

 

Friday 6: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting. Returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 7: In the morning Mr . . .[Sherman] advising on various matters. Mr Bent &

 

Page 275 

Sunday 8: Mr Wm. Bent  came to dinner

 

Monday 9: At Home. Mr Penlington. Mr W Bent relative to Davies business & Letters to Sr. Tho. Broughton. Mr B dined. In the Evening attending Vestrey(sic) Meeting at Talk on the Hill relative to the Indictment of a Highway in the . . .[vicinity] & writing Letter to Sr. John Heathcote.

 

Tuesday 10: At Burslem to have attended Reference of Tolaright business but the same was postponed. Returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 11: At Newcastle attending Newcastle junction Canal Meeting. Sir Nigel Gressley in the Chair. Afterwards dined at Basford with Sir John Heathcote & Mr Wm Bent.

 

Thursday 12: At home. Engaged on the farm & various matters. In the Evening Mr Keys.

 

Friday 13: Miss Bent & Miss Eliza left Linley. Mr Penlington & Mr W P. to dinner. Engaged with them & with the Tenants receiving Rents &c. &c.

 

Saturday 14: At home. Mr Sherwin relative to the payment of his rent & the dispute with Sr. Tho. Broughton & Mr Salmon &c. &c.

 

Sunday 15: Do. In the afternoon at Talk Chapel. Fine day. Commencmt. of Spring.

 

Monday 16: At home. Engaged on the farm &c. Alcock

 

Tuesday 17: Do. Do. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 18: Took Eliza & Mary to Betley dined with Sr. Thomas & returned in the Evening having promised to dine again tomorrow to meet Sir John Chetwode & Mr Swinnerton.

 

Thursday 19: In the morning Mr Penlington & Mr Salmon. Dined at Betley. St J Chetwode & Lady Harriet with two of their daughters. Mr Swinnerton. Returned in the evening after a very pleasant day & urgent invitation from Sr. John & Lady Harriet to come to Oakley which I promised to do. Heavy snow.

 

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Friday 20: At Burslem. Mr Wood having returned from London the Evening before. Received information of the opening of the Nantwich Salt Leg being referred for a week on Acct. of the weather.

 

Saturday 21: At home. Mr Penlington & drawing Agreement for him to be signed by the Tenants of Bortich house farm, relative to Fox leaving & Henshall coming in. Engaged on the farm, but very cold day & in the Evening Snow.

 

Sunday 22: The morning presented the appearance of January from the quantity of Snow that had fallen in the night, lying between 3 & 4 inches deep on the plain. More snow in the forenoon & at one time uncommonly heavy. Mr Hodgson of Congleton came to dinner & staid all  night. Conversation relative to the intended sale by auction on Wednesday next of his Properties at Congleton & Mow. Mr Rowley of Overton valued the trees in the Plantation on Mowcop & which had been planted 23 years (at first 18 inches) at 1/3d apiece on the acreage.

 

Monday 23: At home. Mr H left after breakfast. Eliza & Mary returned from Betley. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 24: At home. Rain. Engaged on the farm. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 25: Do. Do. Began at the bottom of the wood. Much rain.

 

Thursday 26: Do. Engaged with the workmen &c. In the afternoon Mr Cox & Mr Wm Cox relative to certain Amenities granted by Mr Lawton to his Brother & family Arrangements in which I was nominated sole Trustee. Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 27: Mr Cox set out the boundaries of the fence at the Stone quarry &c as directed by James Hanford a very old person

 

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and who was present. Perusing Deed executed by Mr Lawtons & advising further thereon.

 

Saturday 28: At Madeley attending Lieutenancy Meeting & when I qualified with Sr. John Chetwode & Sir Tho. Fletcher as a Comm. of Land tax & assessed taxes - swearing in Assessors &c. &c. A hard day having left home at eight o'Clock & not returning till seven at night to dinner & having been all the time on my legs fully engaged.

 

Sunday 29: At home but much fatigued. Mr Wood came to dinner. Consultation with him on various matters relating to the Manufactory &c. & particularly the proposals made by Messrs. Pitt & Calcraft to let to a Company of Potters their Clay mine in Cornwall.

 

Monday 30: At home. Mr Cox relative to Mr Lawtons business. Alcock. Fine Spring day.

 

May, Tuesday 1: Do. Cut Asparagus. Engaged on the farm. Mr Fourchiquour - Mr Blunt & Stamford came to dinner & staid all night. An uncommonly fine growing day.

 

Wednesday 2: Engaged in the morning on the farm. At Newcastle in the afternoon dining at Mr Sparrows. Adml. & Mrs Child Major Walkin, Gibson, Mr & Mrs W Bent &c.

 

Thursday 3: At home. Engaged with the workmen putting down the posts & chains under the Terrace, laying out the ground &c.

 

Friday 4: At Newcastle attending the Lieutenancy Meeting to ballot for vacancy in the Militia, swearing in Assessors under the Law Assessed Taxes Acts &c. & afterwards at Butterton where I dined with Mr Swinnerton. Cheadle Reference &c.

 

Saturday 5: At home. Engaged on the farm & Grounds

 

Sunday 6: Do. Turned eight milking cows out in the field before the house. Remarkably fine growing weather.

 

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Monday 7: [No entry]

 

Tuesday 8: [No entry]

 

Wednesday 9: At home. Began levelling the ground under the Terrace & putting down the Chain fence. Alcock.

 

Thursday 10: Engaged with the men at Do. In the Evening Mr Funally.

 

Friday 11: At home. Messrs. G Wood, W Bent & T Bent dined.

 

Saturday 12: At Newcastle attending the Lieutenancy Meeting. Mr Kinnersley & self. Dined with Mr Kinnersley.

 

Sunday 13: At home.

 

Monday 14: At Burslem. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 15: At Swinnerton with Mr Bent looking at Mr Tollets farm, Stock &c. & dined with him & Mr & Mrs Sneyd of Darlaston & Revd. Mr Robinson.

Spanish Sheep began to collect in 1798. Has now a flock of 60 & upwards. Fleece about 3lbs weight, which now fetches in price 6/3 per pound, or 18/9 the fleece. These sheep seem to stand the Climate well and are gentle & manageable. A stocking of the full Mans size made from the wool passes through a ring, at least Mr T passed one up to the calf of the Leg. These sheep do not appear at all to degenerate in this Country. Mr Tollet thinks they may rather improve. In five crosses with the Southern they become perfect Spaniards that is continuing to put the Ewe from a cross of Spaniard & Southern to a pure Spaniard & so on. 30,000 bags of Spanish wool, each bag 200 lbs weight annually imported. The great object to insure the breed of these sheep so as not to leave the staple manufacture of fine woollens dependant on a foreign supply. An Acre of Land such as

 

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that about Swinnerton, will maintain eight of these Sheep.

 

Wednesday 16: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

Thursday 17: Do.

 

Friday 18: Do. Sr. Tho. & Lady Fletcher with Mr & Mrs Broughton Mrs Swinnerton Messrs Ray & W Bent dined - Cut cabbage

 

Saturday 19: At Alsager marking some small timber for Posts & Rails &c. Captn. Simpson relative to the reference to me of the dispute with Mr Twemlow respecting Pew in Hanley Chapel

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: At Newcastle pursuant to engagement with Mr Simpson relative to the matter with Mr Twemlow. Dined at Mr Bents. Messrs. Perry, Breck, Hopkins & T Yoxall.

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Wednesday 23: At Maer Hall dining with Mr Jos. Wedgwood, Mr & Mrs Broughton

 

Thursday 24: At home. Mrs Bent & the children

 

Friday 25: Do. At Talk Chapel being the Feast day. Mr Bent came to dinner. Cut cabbage

 

Saturday 26: Do engaged in the farm

 

Sunday 27: Mr Bent came to dinner & Mr Wood. In the Evening Mr & Mrs Bent & the children left us. Mr Wood staid all night.

 

Monday 28: At home. Alcock. Shipley brought a Gig which I had ordered at Stafford.

 

Tuesday 29: Do. In the morning Mr Cox & Mr Timmins viewing the piece of ground below the Terrace and for laying down which I have claimed the Agricultural second prize. Mrs Boyley of Willock & Mrs Knight called. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

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Wednesday 30: At home. Ann & Bessy with Miss Harwood &c came to Linley.

 

Thursday 31: At Trentham attending Meeting of Commrs. of Assessed Taxes. Qualified & acted as Land tax Commr. Sr. Tho. Fletcher J Heathcote, Whitworth, Steadman & self. Dined & returned in the Evening. hard day of business.

 

June, Friday 1: At home. Engaged on the farm &c.

 

Saturday 2: At Burslem

 

Sunday 3: At home. Unwell

 

Monday 4: Do. Engaged in the farm & on various matters.

 

Tuesday 5: Do.

 

Wednesday 6: At Burslem. Dined with Mr Bent at Mr Woods after looking over the Manufactory, Colliery &c. &c.

 

Thursday 7: At home. In the evening Mr Funnaly

 

Friday 8: Do. The 20th anniversary of the happy day that united me to my Eliza.

 

Saturday 9: Do.

 

Sunday 10: Do. At Talk Chapel Mr Hill

 

Monday 11: At Newcastle on various matters. Coombes & Lloyd &c. &c.

 

Tuesday 12: At home. Mr Tollet, Mr Sneyd of Bradwall & Mr Bent dined. Mr Tollet staid all night. Got early potatoes.

 

Wednesday 13: At Newcastle dined at Mr Bents with Mr Bent after going through the Brewery with Miss Harwood & the party. Took Miss Harwood & Eliza junr. in the gig with the young horse.

 

Thursday 14: At home.

 

Friday 15: At Burslem with Miss Harwood going over the works. Took Eliza in the gig.

 

Saturday 16: At home.

 

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Sunday 17: At home. Mr Wm Bent & Mr Barrow dined  - relative to the intended Application to Parliament for a repeal of the Restrictions of the malting of Barley on the . . .[louch] & drawing up Resolutions for the consideration of the Meeting of Maltsters & Brewers appointed to be held at Newcastle tomorrow in consequence of a circular letter which had been received from a Meeting of Maltsters & Brewers held at Bristol.

 

Monday 18: At Newcastle attending such Meeting when Resolutions adopted & directed to be transmitted to the Chairman of the Committee at Bristol. Took Mary in the Gig with Marquis. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 19: At Basford dining. Sr. Tho. Lady Fletcher Miss Fletcher Mr Parker Coke. Duke of Portland a Man in the habits of great profession & experience.

 

Wednesday 20: Took E in the Gig to Basford. At Newcastle meeting Mr Bent, with memorandums relative to the difference of wide & narrow Canals, & on which he had requested my opinion, previous to his going into Lancashire to attend a meeting of the Proprietors of the Bolton & Bury Canal.

 

Thursday 21: Called upon Mr Gilbert. On my return found Mr Blunt. In the evening went to Alsager.

 

Friday 22: At home. Engaged with Mr Blunt

 

Saturday 23: Mr Blunt left us

 

Sunday 24: At home. Farm &c. &c.

 

Monday 25: Do. Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood came to dinner. Alcock. Musick.

 

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Tuesday 26: Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood who left us in the Evening. M Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 27: At Burslem

 

Thursday 28: At Madeley attending Army of Reserve Meeting & Ballot. Sirs J Chetwode F Fletcher & self. Returned late to dinner.

 

Friday 29: In the morning sisters A & B left Linley. Afterwards at Newcastle dining at Mr Kinnersleys to meet Mr Parker Cooke &c.

 

Saturday 30: At Newcastle meeting Mrs Tomlinson of Cheadle pursuant to appointment advising relative to the dispute which had arisen between her & her son, & the best mode of settling their family affairs. Returned to dinner. In the evening Dr. Crompton & Sons.

 

July, Sunday 1: At home. Engaged with Dr Crompton & advising relative to the best mode of provision being made for Miss Bilshaw - £2000 Money to be invested on Trustees, with powers in case of her Marriage to settle or dispose of the same in such manner as under the circumstances they should judge best. Mr Martin came to dinner, advising relative to the Action proposed to be brought agt. the Barton Boat Company for recovery of damages occasioned by the use of the bad flint, which they had sent to W & C - also, respecting the reference to me of dispute between Mr Jos. Wedgwood & Mr Birt of Basford. After dinner the Dr left Linley.

 

Monday 2: At home. Dr. & Mrs Northern called. Alcock did not come; Engaged on various matters.

 

Tuesday 3: At home

 

Wednesday 4: At Newcastle Races. Slept at Mr Bents. For the morning engaged on the reference relating to the Dilphouse Estate.

 

Thursday 5: Do. Returned home in the Evening. Mr Fletcher & Mr . . .[Dawson] . . .  . . . [Stone ends elect].

 

Friday 6: At Trentham. Land tax Appeal on Property Tax . Sir Tho.

 

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Fletcher, J Chetwode, J Heathcote & self. Met Sr. Tho. early with whom looked over the Marquis of Staffords alterations in the House. On my return found Mrs  & Miss Wedgwood who staid all night.

 

Saturday 7: At home. In the Evening attending vestry Meeting at Talk on the Hill relative to Indictment of a Road within the Liberty. Mr & Mrs Skerrett came. Mr Penlington Junr. relative to the Road at Rode Heath.

 

Sunday 8: At home. Rode Letter from Mr Beardmore.

 

Monday 9: Do: Engaged with Mr Skerrett. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 10: At Newcastle in the gig with Mr Skerrett. At Longfield to have brought Miss G Hollins.

 

Wednesday 11: At home.

 

Thursday 12: Began mowing. At Trentham attending Meeting & hearing Appeals under the Property tax. Sr. Jno. Heathcote & self. Dined at Longton. Mr & Mrs Gressley of Seal.

 

Friday 13: At home. Mr Wood & Mr R Skerrett dined

 

Saturday 14: Do. Engaged about the Hay. Mrs Tho. Peake & Children arrived.

 

Sunday 15: Do.

 

Monday 16: Do. Hay

 

Tuesday 17: At Newcastle meeting Mr Blagg of Cheadle & Mr John Tomlinson & advising relative to the best mode of amicably settling the differences between the latter & his mother. Recommended an account, in the first place to be made out, of the difference that would remain between considering him as a Partner, & allowing him interest on his money remaining in his Mothers Lands, & a fair Rent for his Land, occupied & used for the benefit of the business. The reference which stood for this morning of the Delphons business postponed, on account of Mr Brandons being called to London.

 

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Wednesday 18: At Oakley Sr. Jno. Chetwode dining & all night. Sir Tho. Lady W & Miss Fletcher, Mr Davison & Mr Bate.

 

Thursday 19: From Oakley to Trentham meeting Sr. John Heathcote. Appeal over Property tax.

 

Friday 20: Mrs Peake left Linley. In the Evening at Burslem with Mr Skerrett looking at the Engine &c.

 

Saturday 21: Mr & Mrs Skerrett left us.

 

Sunday 22: Mr Bent dined. Consultation relative to the Communications to be made to the Committee found at Bristol for the purpose of obtaining a Repeal of the Clause in the Act 43 Geo 3 Cap 38. [This denotes the 38th Act passed in the 43rd year of King George III's reign] restraining the wetting of Corn and Grain making into Malt, when I undertook to extract & arrange a summary of our observations on this subject, to be transmitted to Mr Peters the Chairman.

 

Monday 23: At Burslem with Eliza. Bishop of Lichfield & Coventry to dine at Mr Woods on Thursday being the Consecration of the Land lately added to the Burial ground. Alcock. Received Summons to attend on the Grand Jury next week at the Assizes.

 

Tuesday 24: Engaged all morning with the papers relative to the Maltings business. Drawing up summary of Observations with Latter to Mr Peters. In the afternoon with Eliza to Newcastle delivering the same to Mr Bent.

 

Wednesday 25: Confined to the house all day. Unwell. Woods sent work on Perspective & his Apperatus(sic).

 

Thursday 26:  At Newcastle early in consequence of an invitation for the Mayor & Corporation to breakfast with the Bishop of L & C it being a Confirmation. Breakfasting accordingly at

 

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the Roebuck. Engaged afterwards till 5 oClock with Sr. Jno. Heathcote at Meeting for hearing further appeals under the Property Tax. Dined together late & returned in the Evening.

 

Friday 27: At home. Hay &c.

 

Saturday 28: Do. Accounts &c.

 

Sunday 29: At Talk Chapel. Mr Hill showed me the . . .[adneasment] which he had obtained of the Chapel Lands, making the whole about 18 ½ Statute acres, & which he offered me at the Rate of 3 Gns. pr. term for the meadow at 25/- pr Acre for the rest of the Lands; making the whole £33.12 p.ternum. On speaking to Mr Beardmore for them I had intended the place if I could have agreed, he said that he could not properly rate it at more that £20 or 20gns. a year at the utmost. A considerable part of the Lands being not worth more than 10/- an acre and even the Meadow in a very impoverished state.

 

Monday 30: At home. Finished the Hay Harvest . Alcock & his son, Musick.

 

Tuesday 31: At home. M Fourchiquour. Mr A Fenton & Mr Vale dined.

 

August, Wednesday 1: Do. In the morning looking over the Chapel Lands with Mr Cox when he gave it as his opinion that £20 a year was the full value

 

Thursday 2: At Stafford Assizes - attending on the grand Jury - But the business being very little returned in the Evening. Indeed two or three of us were not sworn in, owing to there being 23 attending who stood previously on the list.

 

Friday 3: At home.

 

Saturday 4: Do.

 

Sunday 5: Do. Informed Mr Hill by a Note sent by Mr Beardmore that both he and I declined the Offer of the Chapel Lands.

 

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Monday 6: At Burslem. Mr Wood gone to Buxton. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 7: At home. Letter writing. Mr Fourchiquour . 

 

Wednesday 8: At Newcastle dining at Mr Nicksson's 

 

Thursday 9: Do. Attending Meeting under Property Act Shilton Liberty. Sir John Heathcote & Mr Breck & returned in the Evening.

 

Friday 10: Went to Maer Hall with Eliza, Lissy & Ann. Dined & staid all night. Stamford dined.

 

Saturday 11: Eliza & I returned to dinner

 

Sunday 12: At home. In the afternoon Mr Kinnersley & Mr W Bent. The former relative to the Title to the Lands purchased by him from Mr Tho Sutton & the Draught of the Assessment of which I had received from Mr Tho Sparrow in order to settle on the behalf of Mr K.

 

Monday 13: At home. Engaged on the morning on the above business. At a Meeting of Coach masters, wagon keepers, Stable Keepers &c. held in London last week for the purpose of considering of giving the most prompt assistance to Government in the case of . . .[Funsion] Sr. Brook Watson, the Commissioning general, stated that the number of horses of all sorts in Great Britain exceeded three Millions

 

Tuesday 14: At Sandbach with Eliza dining at Mr Furnivals. Mr & Mrs Wm Best Mrs & Miss Watkiss. On our return found Mrs Lawrence of Birmingham & Children.

 

Wednesday 15: At Newcastle early attending Meeting in the Property tax. Sr. John Heathcote & self. Returned to a late dinner bringing Eliza(sic) [Does JC mean Lissy?] & Ann in the Gig who were returning from Maer Hall.

 

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Thursday 16: In the afternoon took Eliza in the Gig to Nantwich

 

Friday 17: At Nantwich

 

Saturday 18: Do.

 

Sunday 19: In the morning returned from Nantwich. Found Mr Wm Bent who dined & with whom long conversation relative to the Brewery &c. &c.

 

Monday 20: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 21: Do. M Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 22: At Burslem. In my return found Mr Heathcote. Mr Scott

 

Thursday 23: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Commr. on property tax Sr. John Heathcote & self. Sent a Letter by Joseph Heath to Mr Harding  of Willoughridge Wells informing him that I had determined to accept the offer of the Coals in my Lands in Audley parish at £200. Returned to dinner.

 

Friday 24: At home. Farm. Mr Turner of Newcastle upon Tyne came in the morning.

 

Saturday 25: At Burslem with Mr Turner looking at the new engine &c. Returned to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour 

 

Sunday 26: Mr Turner went through the service. In the evening took him in the Gig to Peover & from thence walked forwards with him to Knutsford, when we found that Mrs Willett had died the preceding morning. Returned late.

 

Monday 27: At Newcastle attending Meeting of the Proprietors of the Theatre. Mr Kinnersley with Drat. of Assignment & Conveyance of Lands purchased by him of Mr Tho. Sutton with my observations thereon. Returned to dinner. Alcock. Mr

 

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W Scott, & Jas. Alcock. Musick. In the afternoon Mr Jos. Wedgwood on his way to Knutsford when he agreed to stay all night & go with me in the Gig in the morning.

 

Tuesday 28: Took Mr W in the Gig to Knutsford, & paid the last tribute of sincere & much merited respect to an old & worthy friend: my communication with whom subsisted more than 27 years. Mr Turner Mr P Hollins Mr Jos. Wedgwood & self Mr Holland of Sandlebridge & Mr Jos. Potts were the attendants at the funeral. Mrs W was buried in the Chapelyard aged 78. Dined at Mr Hollands & returned in the afternoon when Mr Jos. Wedgwood went forward to Etruria intending to leave Staffordshire on Thursday

 

Wednesday 29: At home.

 

Thursday 30: At Newcastle attending final Meeting on the Property tax Mr Kinnersley & self. Found a Letter from the Board requesting the same Commrs. to act for the current year which I gave my consent to do in case the other Gentlemen would continue to act. Dined at Mr Bents. Dr Northern Mr Blunt & Stamford.

 

Friday 31: At home. Mr Fourchiquour came to dinner in order to start tomorrow with Stamford.

 

September, Sunday 1: At home. In the morning walked with the Gun but found very few Birds, the corn being so little cut.

 

Monday 2: At home. Mr Bent dined relative to the Steps most proper to be taken respecting the repeal of the Malting Restrictions in consequence of a Copy of  Memorial to the Lords of the Treasury received from the Committee at Bristol.

 

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Monday 3: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 4: Do. Harvest. Drawing up Resolution to be laid before a Meeting  of Maltsters & Brewers intended to be held on Monday next, & making extracts from Correspondence with Mr Vansittart, the ideas in which had been adopted by the Committee at Bristol & introduced verbatim into their Memorial to the Lords of the Treasury. [Nicholas Vansittart was then senior secretary to the Treasury becoming Chancellor in 1812. He was the longest serving Chancellor in history(11 years) after Gladstone(12 years 4 months) although not particularly popular.]

 

Wednesday 5: At Newcastle with the above paper for the perusal of Mr Bent. Afterwards attending(sic) to endeavour to settle dispute between Lord Turner & the Corporation relative to the improvement of the Road to Knutton Heath & which was effected. Returned to dinner & found Mr Wood with whom much conversation relative to the Manufactory. Steam engines &c. &c.

 

Thursday 6: Resumed instructing the Girls on Writing. Engaged Drawing & stating Accounts with Mr J Martin. Afterwards dined at Mr J Hickins at Audley. Blunt returned with us in the evening. Pleasant day.

 

Friday 7: Engaged in Do. Mr & Mrs Bayley of Wheelock called. Josiah Podmore of Tunstall for my opinion as to distressing for double Rent under a Notice to quit.

 

Saturday 8: At home. Harvest. In the evening with Eliza at Newcastle.

 

Sunday 9: Do. Note from Mr Hill relative to Chapel Land.

 

Monday 10: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Maltsters & Brewers pursuant to Appointment relative to the further steps to be taken for obtaining a Repeal of the Clauses in 42. Geo 3. & finally arranging Resolutions &c. previous to the same being inserted in the public papers & transmitted to the Members for Newcastle. Returned to dinner.

 

Tuesday 11: At Burslem. Application of improved Steam engine to operations in the Manufactory, & lessening the quantity of hard labour. Returned to dinner. M Fourchiquour.

 

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Wednesday 12: At home.

 

Thursday 13: Do. Alcock. In the evening Mr Fritch. Musick

 

Friday 14: Mr & Miss Swinnerton & Miss McDough came to dinner. Mr Bent dined.

 

Saturday 15: In the morning Mr Swinnerton left us. Mr Holland of Knutsford & Mr Chas. Aiken came to dinner but left Linley in the afternoon, as did Miss McDough [,] & the Miss S & Miss Potts & M Jno Lawrence Jnr. arrived in the Evening.

 

Sunday 16: At home.

 

Monday  17: At Newcastle fair. Brewery &c. Agreed to undertake Reference to me in a Matter under the will of Mr James Robinson deceased between Mrs Cook & Mr Goodwin. Dined at Mr Bents. Mr Sneyd & Capt. Gibson & Mr T Bent.

 

Tuesday 18: At home. In the morning Mr H Salmon & his two Daughters called & breakfasted. Mr & Mrs Bayley of Wheelock & Dr. Northern dined. Alcock & his son. Musick which went off well.

 

Wednesday 19: Mr & Mrs Bayley left us after breakfast. In the afternoon Miss Potts & Miss Stamford set off to Ollerton and I took Eliza to Longfield in the Gig. This day wrote to Mr Rowley London respecting his offer of the Estate late Mrs Johnsons at £800.

 

Thursday 20: At home. Perusing papers in Cook & Goodwin. Wm Beech of Audley with Conveyance of a Farm in Audley & advising him thereon.

 

Friday 21: In the night a great change had taken place in the weather which became severely cold accompanied by a high wind. At home all day. Engaged with various papers &c.

 

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Saturday 22: At home. Still very cold. Engaged with Accounts &c.

 

Sunday 23: Do. Mr Bent dined

 

Monday 24: At Newcastle on various matters. Returned to dinner. In the Evening Mr Tinnock & Moses Barlow relative to the Notice which I had given Barlow to quit the Roebuck house & farm. In the morning John Lawrence left us.

 

Tuesday 25: At home. Wm Beech again relative to his Title, when I redelivered to him the Conveyance which he had left, the Title appearing good. M Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 26: Do. Engaged on the farm, Michael Ashore, Boardman &c.

 

Thursday 26: Do. In the house all day. Not well. various Accounts &c. &c. In the evening Mr Funnaly. 

 

Friday 27: Mr Turnock & Moses Barlow relative to the Roebuck Inn & farm which I agreed to let to Barlow at 55 Gns. a year clear of all taxes & deductions. The wheat field to be laid to it & commence at Lady Day. Michael Ashmore relative to Post & Chain fence. Said that the Lord of the Manor of Audley had no claim to Timber; for that he himself had bought some time ago a lot of Timber growing in a Copyhold Estate, That the Lord pretended to set up some claim or other but abandoned it entirely. In the afternoon with Mr Johnson of the Hollins who said, he had received a Letter from M Rowley informing him that he had sold the Estate in Bent Lane to me, & had received from him Notices to quit for the tenant & which he had served accordingly.

 

Saturday 29: At Burslem with Eliza in the Gig. Duke of Devonshires Service. . . .[Etrurian] of Blue printed ware . . .

 

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Sunday 30: At home.

 

October, Monday 1: Do. Engaged on the farm.

 

Tuesday 2: At Newcastle attending the Corporation as Recorder in election of the Mayor & in the morning the presentation & consecration of the Colours to the Newcastle Volunteers. The former by Mr Fenton the latter by Mr Blunt. Dined afterwards with the Mayor Corporation &c at the Roebuck. AS very pleasant & not ill spent day.

 

Wednesday 3: At home. Farm.

 

Thursday 4: Do. At Burrow at dinner. In the evening Mr Skerrett relative to Miss Jane Audley's Acct. with the Estate of Mr Penlington &c.

 

Friday 5: Mr Skerrett left Linley. Afterwards at Burslem by appointment meeting Messrs. W Sneyd, Capt. Gibson, Bagshaw, W Bent & T Bent viewing the engine &c. &c. & also together with Mr Wood came to Linley afterwards to dinner. In the morning Mr Peake arrived from the Sessions.

 

Saturday 6: At home. Monsr. Fourchiquour with the Abbé de L'artre & Mr Blunt dined. Much, & pleasant conversation.

 

Sunday 7: At Newcastle attending the Mayor as Recorder . . . Excellent sermon preached by Mr Leigh. Returned early in the afternoon & engaged in preparing for Journey to Cambridge the next day.

 

Monday 8: At six oClock this morning left Linley Wood accompanied by Stamford & attended by Robert & arrived at Leinster about 7 where we slept. The next day dined at Huntington & arrived in good time at Cambridge. Mr Vale spent the Evening with us. Next day at 12 called at Mr Cotton at his

 

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Chambers who accompanied us to the . . . rooms of which Stamford having made his choice proceeded to procure the various articles of College Housekeeping. Appointed with Mr Cotton to dine with him the next day in order to meet Herbert Marsh the learned Translator of Michaelis & the no less able & celebrated Historian of the Politics of Great Britain & France to whom Mr Cotton had learned from Mr Blunt my wish to be introduced. Thursday. Mr Cotton breakfasted with me pursuant to appointment & long conversation with him relative to my views in respect to Stamford, his prospects in life, Profession, allowance at the university & other topics proper to be discussed between Parent & Tutor. Highly gratified by this conversation which proved to me that Mr Cotton was worthy of my most implicit confidence: & that at Cambridge every advantage that education can afford may be acquired. Spent the Morning afterwards in viewing the Colleges Library &c. &c. Cambridge not so striking as Oxford, but nevertheless a fine Place. Kings Chapel superior to any thing at Oxford. Stamford & self introduced by Mr Cotton to Dr. Craven, Master of St John's a most benevolent, amicable & learned man. At four went to Mr Cottons where we had the pleasure to be introduced to Mr Marsh. Mr Cotton also introduced us to a Mr Toby, Son of Lord Borton a young student & engaging appearance, & Mr Cockburn Son of Sir James Cockburn, a fellow of St John's & who had gained the Seatonian prize & was also the Author of the Account . . . Lord Camelford, but by

 

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which performance he did not seem to have gained any reputation, it being considered as a mere Nullition of friendship. [The Seatonian prize was set up in 1750 and has been awarded annually ever since by Cambridge University for the best English poem on a sacred subject.] Mr Cockburn appeared to me to be a Man of parts, of considerable not to say high literary attainment, & to possess all the case politeness & manners of a Man of Fashion. Highly gratified with the hours I spent in this Society. Marsh to the most Profound learning & seemingly unbounded knowledge adds the greatest cheerfulness, gaiety, & vivacity & you only discover the former through the medium or rather in the garb of the latter. No Coldness, no pedantry, no austerity. He seems indeed like Learning & Knowledge at play. Dr. Curries observation to me on McIntosh was frequently in my mind. Tap him, said Dr Currie, to me, on any subject and he always flows. Mr Marsh very obligingly insisted on our spending another day together & after some friendly & kind contention it was settled that Mr Cotton & he should dine with me the next day. Mr Toby also agreed to be of the party. Mr Cockburn had gone early & I had therefore no opportunity of inviting him. The next day we accordingly met again. Conversation if possible more various & spiritual & interesting that the day before. Marsh a great admirer of the women, pronouncing the Society of accomplished sensible & well informed females one of our most rational & delightful pleasures; but he abhors pedantry & affection taken of any kind & says there can be no truly accomplished woman who is not augmented with whatever is necessary for the comfort & enjoyment of

 

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domestic life & playfully declared that he held a knowledge of the culinary art to be more indispensable than Musick, French or Drawing. We wandered over a variety of topics all of which he embellished rendering the greatest lively & amusing & the  most light & trifling, important. Education, Manners, Customs & habits of other Nations, State of Learning &c. &c. succeeded one other till we declined to Commerce, Manufactories & Agriculture, & on the Cotter he gayly(sic) promised to write into Saxony to obtain for me information how to preserve Cabbages through the winter & which is done with success in that Country. This offer I gladly embraced as opening a door to further Communication with this truly superior Man. We parted with material kindness Mr Marsh promising at some time to visit me at Linley Wood & in the mean time to obtain information for me on any subject with Commerce or the Arts that I might wish for from abroad, when he said that his communications were extensive & of the first order having spent not less than 14 years in different parts of the Continent. In the evening Mr Blick Mainwaring & Vale supped. Also on six oClock on Friday I got into the Chaise on my return home, having thus gone through & concluded the last scene of one of the important Acts in the drama of human life, that of closing the school education of an only son.

 

[Written in pencil diagonally across the bottom of the page by James Stamford Caldwell]  God for ever bless you, my kind Father!! J. S.C

 

 

 

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Sunday 14: Arrived at home in the Evening & realised all the delight of returning into the bosom of a tenderly beloved & amiable family.

 

Monday 15: At home. Engaged settling Accts &c. arranging papers &c. &c.

 

Tuesday 16: At Stone attending meeting of the Committee & Genl. Assembly - Reference to me of dispute relative to Lands at Newchapel belonging to the Charity School formally taken for the use of the Canal; & also of the important question, which had been so long agitated, as to the hability of the Company to make a Concession for Coals & other Mines lying under the Canal. Invitation from Adml. Child to meet St Tho Broughton & Mr & Mrs Mainwaring of Whitmore at dinner on Thursday but declined it being engaged to attend the Sessions at Newcastle on that day. Returned in the evening.

 

Wednesday 17: At home.

 

Thursday 18: Do. The weather being so wet as to prevent my going to Newcastle.

 

Friday 19: At Newcastle attending Agricultural Society Meeting. Prize of 5 Gnes. or silver cup adjudged to me for laying down with Grass seeds. Returned in the evening. [James used this price money to buy a silver salver which still exists in the Heath-Caldwell family. The inscription on it reads 'Premiums given by the NEWCASTLE and POTTERIES AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY to James Caldwell Esquire of Linley Wood, viz Ten Guineas for draining in the best Manner the greatest Quantity of Land in 1801, Seven Guineas for laying down Land in permanent Pasture in the best Manner in 1803, and Five Guineas for laying down Land for Pasture in like Manner in 1804'].

 

Saturday 20: At Madeley to have attended Appeal under the assessed taxes but found the Meeting had been held the Saturday before. . . .[Mistake] of Mr Beechs Letter which I found on my return from Cambridge. On my return dined at Mr Bents with Mr Blunt & Mr Robt. Griffin.

 

Sunday 21: In the house all day. Mr Bent dined.

 

Monday 22: At home. In the evening Mr Chas Aikin arrived.

 

Tuesday 23: At Burslem with Mr C. Aiken looking at the Engine &c.

 

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Wednesday 24: At Newcastle early & engaged closely in the Counting House all day & till late in the Evening adjusting & settling the annual Brewery Accounts.

 

Thursday 25: In the morning long walk & much conversation with Mr Aikin. Alcock. Mr Blunt came to dinner.  In the evening Mr Fritche

 

Friday 26: Unwell with a violent cold but under the necessity of going up to Talk to attend Copyhold Court, when Surrender passed of the Cart Estate (in the holding of Moses Barlow) purchased from Mr Turnock: & more particularly to explain to the Copyholders the reasonableness & necessity of resisting the Claim set up by Sir. Tho. Fletcher to Times uncertain within the Manor of Audley; when it was determined that a Meeting of the Copyholders should be held to consider of the business & the Steward, Mr Thos. Fenton, agreed that the fines required by Sir Thos. being one years in hand value instead of 20sh customary here shd. not be called for till Lady day next. [That is 25th March 1805]

 

Saturday 27: In the morning early Mr Aikin left us. At Newcastle all day again finishing & finally closing Brewery Accounts for the year ending 6th Ocr. 1804.

 

Sunday 28: At home.

 

Monday 29: Do. In the Evening Mr & Mrs Bent previous to W B & I setting out to Manchester.

 

Tuesday 30: Set off to Manchester with Mr & Mrs W.B. Mr B & I in the Gig Mrs B & Rowland in a Chaise. Arrived at Mr Jas. Hardmans at Somerville to dinner where we met T.W. & Mrs Atkinson with whom I returned in the Eveng. to the Back.

 

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Wednesday 31: Engaged with Mr. J.H. & Mr. B. settling their Acct. & paying the money which I had agreed to advance Mr. B. in order to pay off Mr. H. Dined at the Bank Mr & Mrs H. Mr. & Mrs James. Mr & Mrs Thos. Atkinson Mr & Mrs Bent.

 

November, Thursday 1: Engaged at Manchester. Called on Mr Wm. Hardman looked over his pictures & Coins. Fine Head by Rembrandt. Amongst his coins an Otho & an undoubted Queen Annes farthing. The latter a very beautiful coin. Sale of Pictures. A good Cuyp. [Aelbert Jacobsz Cuyp 1620 - 1691 Dutch landscape painter] Rathbone a Landscape Painter just come to Manchester whose style pleased me so much that I ordered five of his Pictures. [Probably John Rathbone c.1750 - 1807] Mr Simmonds the Surgeon where we had called to look at his pictures, and who took us to Mr Rathbones dined at the Bank with Mr R. Surgical & anatomical conversation. Population of Manchester estimated at 110,000.

 

Friday 2: Set off on our return home. Came to the Red bull at Lawton, it being the annual Meeting, to dinner.

 

Saturday 3: At home. Farm &c. &c. 

 

Sunday 4: Do. Mr Cooke relative to the Reference to me of the  matter Cooke & Goodwin.

 

Monday 5: At Newcastle on various matters. Called on Mrs Cooke pursuant to the Request. Brought Mary & Ann who had been spending a few days at Basford in the Gig. Found a very satisfactory Letter from Stamford. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 6: At home. Engaged in Accounts Letter writing &c.

 

Wednesday 7: Took Eliza to Burslem to see Mrs Wood. Long conversation with Mr Wood relative to the Manufactory &c. &c.

 

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Thursday 8: Engaged all morning Planting the Ground at the entrance between the first gate & James Oldcots Cottage. Mr Wood came to dinner. In the Evening Mr Keys.

 

Friday 9: At Newcastle settling Account of  Feeding Stock &c at the Brewery. Afterwards dined at the Closing of the Bowling Green at Noahs Ark. Returned in the Evening. Subscribed 5 Gns. to the Dispensary & an annual one of 2 Gns.

 

Saturday 10: At home. Engaged settling various Accounts &c. &c. perusing & making extracts from Brief in the Birmingham Canal cause tried at Stafford Assizes 1803 & which Mr Robinson had sent for my perusal thinking that it might assist me in my opinion on the important Question which had been proposed to be referred to me, as to the hability of  Proprs. of Canals to pay for Coals & other minerals lying under the Canals.

 

Sunday 11: At home.

 

Monday 12: Do. Engaged on the farm. Alcock

 

Tuesday 13: At Burslem. returned to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 14: At home. Farm

 

Thursday 15: Do. Engaged with the labourers taking down the old hedge before the farm & laying out the Road. Engaged Mr Holland as Gardener. 12/- pr. week & a house.

 

Friday 16: At home. Perusing papers & Acts of Parliament relating to the duties on Malt, to enable me to prepare a Statement of the Case of the Maltsters proposed to be laid before the Marquis of Stafford. Afterwards engaged with the Men at the Farm & Road. Agreed with Wm Cooper for taking immediate possession of the Land lately purchased from Mr . . .[Rowlege.]

 

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Saturday 17: At home. Engaged with the farm in the Plantation &c. Mr Penlington relative to Rect. of Rents & appointed Wednesday next. In the afternoon attending Vestry Meeting at Talk on the Hill relative to the Road indicted by Sr. John Heathcote

 

Sunday 18: Do. In the afternoon at Talk Chapel

 

Monday 19: At Newcastle on various matters. Returned to dinner.

 

Tuesday 20: In the morning meeting Sir John Heathcote Mr Cox &c. relative to the Road, when it was finally agreed that it should be repaired by Talk but the . . .[expense]to abide the event of an enquiry to be made by Mr Cox & myself as to the boundaries of the Liberties of Talk & Lawton. Sir John Heathcote with Mr Bent & Mr Wm Bent & Mr Sparrow afterwards dined at Linley Wood.

 

Wednesday 21: At Burslem to have met Mr Bent for the purpose of making further observations of the Steam in the new Engine, but Mr Bent being prevented coming Mr Beech met me, but the experiments could not be made with the accuracy we wished from the want of a thermometer, Mr J Wedgwood being afraid of hazarding his, being the one on the use of which we valued. Returned by Mr Bent by Newcastle. Marquis of Stafford &c. &c. Conversation relative to my calling on his Lordship. Mr Skerrett came to dinner. Mr Penlington & his son & receiving his Rents.

 

Thursday 22: Engaged with Mr Skerrett on the farm &c. Mr Haywood looking over Ground for new Plantation behind the Bath.

 

Friday 23: In the morning Mr Skerrett left us. Engaged on the farm. Began putting down the Post and Chain fence along the Meadow.

 

Saturday 24: Attending Meeting at Trentham Inn Sir John Chetwode &

 

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T Fletcher, Mr Mainwaring & self swearing in assessors under Property tax for the current year having consented to act again as a Commissr. Returned to dinner. M Fourchiquour who staid all night.

 

Sunday 25: At home. Mr Bent came to dinner. Appointed to call on Lord Stafford with Mr Bent on Wednesday next.

 

Monday 26: Do. Confined in the house with a sore throat. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 27: At home.  M Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 28: At Trentham with Mr Bent of Basford, making a Call on the Marquis of Stafford. Polite & pleasant reception & engaged to dine with his Lordship tomorrow. On my return found the Cottage belonging to Talk Chapel on fire & which was burnt to the ground. Accident occasioned by children setting fire to the thatch.

 

Thursday 29: At Do. accordingly Mr Bent, Lady Lavington, a very pleasant well informed woman, The Marquis & Marchioness, Lady Charlotte & myself formed the dinner party. A very pleasant day & much satisfied with the reception I met with.

 

Friday 30: In the morning at Burslem attending Meeting under the Commission of Banks agt. Ralph Wedgwood, & proving debt as one of the Exor. of the late Mr Wedgwood, also a small Debt of my own. I assisting Mr Byerley in getting purchase . . . &c completed(sic). From there to Butterton to dinner. Eliza, Miss Stamford, Lissy, Emma & Louisa. Mr Tho. Sparrow. Staid all night.

 

December, Saturday 1: Returned home to dinner after a long walk &  much conversation with Mr Swinnerton on various matters.

 

Sunday 2: At home.

 

Monday 3: Do. Alcock.

 

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Tuesday 4: Do. Uncommonly cold & severe day.

 

Wednesday 5: Do.

 

Thursday 6: Do. Engaged with Mr Haywood in the Plantation behind the Bath which we this day began. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Friday 7: At Rode Heath attending Meeting of Sr. Tho. Broughton & Mr Salmon on Mr Penlingtons affairs, when I promised to consult the Creditors & . . . [put a piece] on the works to Sr. Tho. & also to consider if any means could be devised of making him secure in laying out Money on the Public house. On my return engaged in the Plantation.

Saturday 8: Took Elizth. (by which name I shall hereafter distinguish her from her Daughter in these minutes) in the gig to Newcastle. Returned to dinner.

 

Sunday 9: At home

 

Monday 10: Do. Began levelling the Meadow, for the purpose of Irrigation. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 11: Do. Engaged with labourers &c. M. Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 12: Art Betley to dinner. Elizth. Eliza Mary & Miss Stamford. In the Evening Musick. Alcock Miss Bents & Mr Deanes. Staid all night.

 

Thursday 13: Returned home to dinner.

 

Friday 14: At home.

 

Saturday 15: At Burslem

 

Sunday 16: Do.

 

Monday 17: At Newcastle settling account of late Partnership of S & C with Mr Thos. Sutton. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

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Tuesday 18: At home. Engaged with labourers &c. M. Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 19: Do. Perusing Papers in Goodwin & Cook & drawing Minutes of my Award. The like in a Case referred to me on Monday last by Mr Thos. Fenton & Mr Poole.

 

Thursday 20: At home. Mr Blunt came to dinner.

 

Friday 21: Do. Engaged with Mr Blunt.

 

Saturday 22: At Trentham. Attending Meeting of Commrs. under the Property Tax Acct. Receiving Assessments. Sirs Jno. Chetwode, T FletcherH Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Returned to Newcastle to dinner & engaged with Mr Thos Smith& Mr Sparrow in the business of Godwin & Cook & giving instructions for my Award.

 

Sunday 23: At home

 

Monday 24: At Longport by request of Major Davenport, inspecting the Longport Volunteers as a Deputy Lieutenant in order to certify the state of their Arms & Accoutrements. Good repair. Returned to dinner.

 

Tuesday 25: At Hanley. Inspecting with Mr Steadman the Hanley & Shelton & Etruria Volunteers for the above purpose. Good order & repair & certified accordingly. Dined with the Lieut. Col.(Whitehead) & returned in the Evening. Gratifying Letter from Stamford & his Mother.

 

Wednesday 26: At home. Mr Wood came to dinner. In the Afternoon Engaged with Tenants receiving Rents &c.

 

Thursday 27: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Proprietors of Newcastle Junction Canal, when I proposed  a specl. Genl. Assembly shd. be held for the purpose of considering of creating a number of New Shares to be disposed of amongst

 

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the Proprietors at a reduced price in order to raise Money sufficient to repay the voluntary advance of £5 per share & the debts due from the Company. Afterwards dined at the Club & returned in the Evening.

 

Friday 28: At home. Engaged in various matters.

 

Saturday 29: Do. Mr Penlington & Mr Collison previous to my endeavouring to agree with Sr. Tho. Broughton for Sale of Mr P.s Moiety of the Saltworks.

 

Sunday 30: At home.

 

Monday 31: Set off to Nantwich

 

[Rest of week not written up.]

[1805, January not noted by JC until next page]

 

Saturday 5: At Doddington. Agreed with Sr. Thos Broughton for sale of Mr Penlingtons Moiety of Saltworks at . . . for £8000

 

[Sunday & Monday not written up]

 

Tuesday 8: At Linley Meeting Mr Crompton of Chorley Hall 

 

Wednesday 9: Returned to Nantwich

 

Thursday 10: Nantwich

 

Friday 11: Called at Dorfold

 

Saturday 12: Returned to Linley

 

[Sunday & Monday not written up]

 

Tuesday 15: Went to Oakley to dinner Elizabeth Eliza Miss Stamford & self. . . . Assembly

 

Wednesday 16: Returned home. Dined at the Roebuck & at Newcastle Assembly.

 

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[Thursday 17 to Sunday 20th not written up]

[Monday] 21: The time from the last Entry taken up with journey to Nantwich & Oakley & sundry engagements which have interrupted the correct keeping of the Journal, but which I now resume on this day being my Birthday. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: At Trentham Inn Attending Meeting of Commrs. Appeal under the Assessed Taxes. Sirs Jno. Chetwode & T Fletcher Mr Steadman & self. Came to Newcastle to all a late dinner at the Roebuck & engaged in the Evening with the Mayor &c it being the Sessions. Slept at Mr Bents, Heavy Snow.

 

Wednesday 23: In the night much Snow. Engaged with Mr Bent & Mr Valthall relative to Bents purchase of the Stoney field House &c from Mrs H Hatrell. Returned to Linley Wood to dinner.

 

Thursday 24: At home. Children writing. Mr Penlington on his affairs. Misses Barlow advising on sundry matters. Settling various Christmas accounts &c writing letters &c. In the evening children drawing. Frost & Snow.

 

Friday 25: Do. Do. Mr Sherwin when he agreed to give up the Dwelling House &c at Rode Heath at Lady day next. Considering case received from Mr Fenton & Mr Poole for my opinion. In the evening reading with the Children.

 

Saturday 26: Set off to have gone to Porthall & Burslem but found the Roads so slippery from the frost that I returned. Writing Letter to Sr. Thos. Broughton &c. Drawing abstract of Mr Penlingtons Marriage Settlemt. to be sent to Mr . . .[Blurton] & looking at & arranging Title Deeds relating to the house & Shop at Nantwich which I had sold to Mr Lacon the Int. for £400. Evening Drawing with the children.

 

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Sunday 27: At home. Service as usual. Mr Bent came to dinner advising relative to his late purchase &c. & also relative to the proceedings to be adopted at the Meeting of the Propt. of the Newcastle Junction Canal appointed to be held on Tuesday next. Still severe frost.

 

Monday 28: At home. Engaged preparing Drat. of Resolutions to be laid before the Genl. Assembly of Newcastle Junction Canal Co appointed to be held tomorrow &c. Alcock & Jas. Alcock to dinner. In the evening Musick.

 

Tuesday 29: At Newcastle attending Genl. Assembly of Canal Company when the plan I had proposed of raising money by disposing of additional Shares amongst the Proprs. at a reduced price was unanimously adopted. but from the merits of the Question adjourned to Saturday the 2nd Feby. Dined at Mr Kinnersleys. . . . relative to his execution of the Agreemt. for sale of Lawton Saltworks explaining this business to him. Returned in the Evening & found Mr Lawrence, Miss Potts & Miss Turner. Severe Cold.

 

Wednesday 30: Engaged all morning with Mr Lawrence who with Miss Potts left us after dinner.

 

Thursday 31: At home. Considering & preparing Resolutions to be finally adopted by the Newcastle Junction Canal Company. perusing their Act of Parliament &c & drawing up Resolutions to be proposed of Saturday. Mr Gibbons relative to the Poor Rates of Lawton & his Remedy for having advanced the quota of Parishioners. In the Evening Mr Keys. Dancing &c.

 

February, Friday 1: The severity of the weather prevented my going to Burslem to converse with Mr Wood on the expediency

 

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applying for a patent on the improvements which had suggested themselves to his friend & which he had communicated to me by letter for . . . Earthen Wares. Mr Wm Hindley arrived. Engaged with him till after dinner when he set off to Newcastle. Resumed the consideration & statement of the Case agreed to be submitted to the Judges as to the Hability of Parish Apprentices to be charged to the Assessed Taxes.

 

Saturday 2: At Newcastle attending the adjourned General Assembly of Junction Canal Company & laying before them the Resolutions as finally settled, which was unanimously approved & ordered to be printed. Messrs Fenton & Poole relative to the Bankruptcy Case referred to me, with my sentiments on which both professed themselves to be satisfied & desired me to give my opinion in writing. Mr Walthall relative to the inclosure of the Commons within the Manor of Mere. Mr Bill questions under the property tax. From Newcastle to Ponthill to have obtained the signature of Mr Clowes to the Agreement for Sale of the Moiety of Lawton Saltworks, but he was from home. To Burslem Consultation with Mr Wood on proposed Patent & various Matters. Returned late to dinner. Fatiguing day the weather being very severe & the Roads covered with Snow & Ice.

 

Sunday 3: At home. Service as usual. Finally corrected the Canal Resolutions for the Proofs to be sent to the Printer tomorrow. In the Evening Rain.

 

Monday 4: At home. Engaged with various papers. Alcock

 

Tuesday 5: Do. Miss Fletcher & Miss Bent came to Linley. M Fourchiquour.

 

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Wednesday 6:  Miss Turner left Linley. At home Engaged all morning with various papers, particularly compleating(sic) Case for the opinion of the Judges on the hability of Apprentices to the hole(sic) Servants tax.

 

Thursday 7: At home - Closely engaged all morning with Do. Mr Blunt & Mr Bent came to dinner. Frost going.

 

Friday 8: Miss Fletcher & Miss Bents left Linley, At Burslem from there to Ponthill when Mr Clowes signed the Agreement for Sale of the Moiety of the Saltworks. Returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 9: At Madeley attending meeting under the assessed Taxes. Sr. Jno Chetwode Sr. Thos. Fletcher & self. Delivered the case for the opinion of the Judges to Mr Clarke the Surveyor of the Taxes. To Butterton. Dined with Mr. Swinnerton Mr Blunt. Returned in the Evening after a fatiguing day the weather being very hot & close.

 

Sunday 10: At Breakfast Mr Penlington relative to a Communication which he had had with Mr Wilbraham respecting the purchase of the Moiety of the Packhorse farm, Repairs &c. & who had expressed a wish that I should meet him at Rode heath tomorrow at one. Service as usual.

 

Monday 11: Mr Twiss relative to the Claim set up by the Lord of the Manor of Audley to a fine uncertain, in respect of the Copyhold Lands, instead of the usual & accustomed fine of 20s per Customary Acre when Mr Twiss promised to see Mr. . .[Aceve], of Crewe, tomorrow, for the purpose of fixing a Meeting of the Copyholders, to determine in the steps proper to be taken. Afterwards at Rode heath meeting Mr Wilbraham pursuant

 

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to Appointment, who came with Mr Wittenhall. Surveyed the state of repair of the Buildings. Mr Wilbraham bid £1200 for Mr Ps Share, or £1300 inclusive of Timber but this offer refused being as, I myself thought, much beneath the value. Returned to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 12: At home. Engaged writing letters with Abstract of Mrs Penlingtons settlement & one part of the purchase Agreement of the Moiety of Saltworks to Mr Edleston, & also writing to Mr Skerrett on the same business.  Afterwards engaged laying out & planting the ground between the two ponds in the farm garden. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 13: Do. Engaged with Labourers in the grounds compleating plantation &c &c Farm &c &c,

 

Thursday 14: At Newcastle attending Agricultural meeting. Sr. Jno. Heathcote in the Chair. Mr Tollet did not come owing to Mrs T indisposition. Attended with the Mayor at the Public Office on the examination of a prisoner charged with stealing watches. Delivered to Mr Finton the Bankruptcy Case with my opinion in Writing. Returned in the Evening, with Mr Gilbert. Miss Bent -Mr Keys Dancing. In the morning delivered to Mr . . .[Winstanley] Rob. th. Title Deeds to the Dwellinghouse at Nantwich sold to Mr Lacon, in order that an abstract might be made & sent to him & gave Instructions to Mr Martin for Conveyances from Mr . . .[Wigwell] & Mr Bewley to me

 

Friday 15: At home. Mr Crompton of Hare Castle with Title Deeds relating to Dwellinghouse at Talk pits for my perusal on the behalf of Walter Barlow & perusing the same. Afterwards engaged on the farm, particularly superintending the putting down of the Chain fence across the top of the Meadow. In the evening reading

 

Page 310

Saturday 16: At home. Mr Johnson of Halmesend with Title Deeds relating to an Estate purchased by him from Adm. Child and perusing the same for Mr Johnsons satisfaction. Again engaged on the farm planting. Filled up the plantation at . . .[Jeraller] Moor Gate and planted black Italian poplars along the fence between the Meadow & the Wood. Observe the growth of these, the soil appearing to be favourable. The plants are from three to four feet high. In the Evening reading.

 

Sunday 17: At home. Service as usual.

 

Monday 18: At Burslem. On my return found Mr Skerrett. Alcock & E Luke.

 

Tuesday 19: At home. Engaged with Mr Skerrett  Mr Penlingtons Acct. with Mr Salmon mode of arranging it &c. &c. Long walk over the farm and grounds.  Mr Johnson again relative to his . . .

Title

 

Wednesday 20: Fast day. Mr Skerrett left us after breakfast. At Talk Chapel. Mr & Miss . . . Hill called after service. In the evening reading.

 

Thursday 21: Engaged on the farm. Miss Hickens came to dinner.

 

Friday 22: At Newcastle attending Junction Canal Co. Meeting when Resolution for disposing of additional Shares at a reduced price agreed to. Returned home to dinner.

 

Saturday 23: At Madeley attending meeting assessed Taxes &c. Sr. Jno. Chetwode Sr. J Fletcher Mr Mainwaring & self. Returned late to dinner. Miss Hickens left us. In the Evening reading.

 

Sunday 24: Mr Penlington relative to a Notice which he had received from Mr Wilbraham to attend a survey of Packhorse farm Buildings on Thursday next & writing answer to be sent.

 

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by Mr Penlington. Service as usual

 

Monday 25: At home. Engaged on the farm &c.

 

Tuesday 26: Do. Do. This morning planted with my own hand a thorn hedge along the garden before the farm. Wm. Holland & Tho. Hancock assisting. Quicks 6 to a yard & about 12 inches long. Letter from Nantwich with Acct. of the illness of my sister Mrs S & requesting Eliza & me to come over.

 

Wednesday 27: Took Eliza in the gig this morning to Nantwich where we found Mrs S very much indisposed with a nervous attack & our friends in great distress. At night Mrs S extremely ill which occasioned Eliza & myself with Ann & Bessy to stay by her all night. After a violent agitation of 5 hours she began to be more composed about 3 in the morning. She had been prevailed upon to take Dr Reynolds medicine prescribed to me in London.

 

Thursday 28: Mrs S something better this morning the medicine appearing to have had the best effects but Eliza & I determined to wait the want of another day.

 

March, Friday 1: Mrs S indifferent night but better this morning. About 11 she fell into a profound sleep. Left Nantwich at half past two but Eliza remained.

 

Saturday 2: At home. Engaged on various matters. Writing Letters to Mr Rowley relative to Trees in Linley Lane advertised by the Ladies of the Manor for sale.

 

Sunday 3: Returned to Nantwich but found an amendt. in Mrs S.

 

Monday 4: From Nantwich with Eliza in the Gig. Arrived at Linley to dinner. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 5: At home. Engaged with Labourers taking down the fence below the wood which separated the Land lately purchased from Mr Rowley. M Fourchiquour. In the afternoon Mr Penlington on his affairs.

 

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Wednesday 6: Took Eliza again to Nantwich. Talk Chaise. Found Mrs S. in nearly the same state. Returned in the Evening.

 

Thursday 7: In the morning Girls writing. Mr Penlington & Mr Saint relative to repairs of Packhorse farm. Engaged again with labourers. In the evening Perspective.

 

Friday 8: At home. Engaged on the farm. In the Evening Dr Crompton arrived.

 

Saturday 9: At Madeley attending Meeting under Assessed Taxes & Meeting of Magistrates. Sirs Tho. Broughton & Jno. Chetwode Mr Mainwaring & self. Finally settled & agreed Case for the Opinion of the Judges relative to the liability of  Apprentices to 5 . . .[duty]. Appointed to meet Sr. Tho Broughton at Rode on Tuesday next at 11. Returned to a late dinner.

 

Sunday 10: At home. In the morning Mr Sutton relative to . . .[Diveley] house on Rode heath. After dinner Dr Crompton left Linley.

 

Monday 11: At Newcastle on various matters. Conveyances from Mr Meynell & Mr Rowley &c. &c.  Returned to dinner. Alcock. Mr Saint with estimate of repairs of Packhorse farm.

 

Tuesday 12: At Rode heath & Lawton Saltworks Meeting Sir Tho. Broughton by appointment looking over Buildings &c in the holding of Mr Sherwin & on various other matters. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 13: About eight oClock this morning received by a Messenger the melancholy  intelligence of the death of my highly respectable & valued Sister who had expired about eight oClock the night before. Set off with Eliza to Nantwich.

 

Page 313

Thursday 14: Returned with Eliza to Linley.

 

Friday 15: At home. Eliza went to Nantwich.

 

Saturday 16: At home. Laid Bone dust on the field before the house. Attending meeting of Copyholders at Talk relative to Claim set up by the Lord of the Manor to fines uncertain.

 

Sunday 17: Went to Nantwich

 

Monday 18: At Nantwich. Paid the last duties to my highly valued & respected sister. Funeral at 11. Messrs Garnet, Yoxall, Hall, Wickstead, Kent & Bowman with Mr . . .[Clarksant] & Mr . . .[Tixes]

 

Tuesday 19: Returned with Eliza to Linley to dinner

 

Wednesday 20: At home. Mr W. Bent & Mr Walthall dined & signed Notes as Security for Mr Bent to Mrs H Hartsill by the purchase money of Stoney fields. £1000 payable at Christmas next & £1500 payable at Christmas 1807.

 

Thursday 21: At home. Engaged with Labourers making walk through the Plantation at the house &c. &c.

 

Friday 22: At Burslem. Sent to Mr Johnson [of] Congleton per Mary Bickerton Copy of . . .[Du??] relative to the Manor of Audley to enable him to prepare a Case pursuant to the Resolutions of the Meeting held at Talk on the 16th.

 

Saturday 23: At Madeley attending Meeting under Property tax Sr. Jno. Chetwode J Fletcher Mr Mainwaring & self. Busy day. Dined on my return at the Roebuck.

 

Sunday 24: At home. In the house all day unwell.

 

Monday 25: Do. Mr Johnson of Congleton relative to Case respecting Audley copyholds & engaged with him a long time sketching out case &c. Mr Johnson dined. Alcock.

 

Page 314

Tuesday 26: At Madeley again. Property tax. Same Commrs. as on Saturday. Returned late.

 

Wednesday 27: At home perusing papers &c. relative to Audley Copyholders & other matters previous to my going to Stafford tomorrow.

 

Thursday 28: At Stafford on the Grand Jury. Ld. Tamworth foreman. Much more business than expected.

 

Friday 29: Do. Do. Grand Jury not discharged till half past 5 oClock. Came to Newcastle on my return & slept at the Roebuck.

 

Saturday 30: Mr Bent. Stoney fields House &c. Returned home but so unwell as to be prevented dining at Sr. J Fletchers with Sr. Jno Chetwode & Mr Mainwaring which I had promised to do.

 

Sunday 31: At home. but unwell. Service as usual.

 

April, Monday 1: At home. The Collectors for Burslem relative to a distress made under the property tax in Mr Combe of Newcastle for his assessment which he had refused to pay. Mr Penlington & Mr Sherwin relative to the House &c on Rode heath when I finally proposed that Mr Sherwin should have the option of holding it for one year from May next, in case he could not meet with an eligible Tenant to be approved of Sr. T Broughton & Mr P in the meantime. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 2: At home. Engaged perusing papers & drawing Case relative to the Manor of Audley. Collector of Burslem

 

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again. M Fourchiquour. Radishes.

 

Wednesday 3: Letter to Mr Powys respecting Mr Fouchiquour's [Monsieur Fouchècourt?] attendance at . . .[Wishroad] & engaged on various other matters.

 

Thursday 4: At Maer Hall to dinner

 

Friday 5: Came to Mr W Bents to dinner. Communication of Offer made to Mr B from Sr. J Heathcote of taking a share in a new Brewery. Returned in the evening.

 

Saturday 6: At home.

 

Sunday 7: Do.

 

Monday 8: Do. Engaged with Labourers making walk through the Stancliffe. Mr Penlington. Miss L returned from Nantwich.

 

Tuesday 9: Do. Do. Mr Fourchiquour [Monsieur Fouchècourt?]

 

Wednesday 10: At Rode heath with Adml Child viewing land taken for the use of the Canal belonging to . . . [Newchapel] School in order to settle the price &c. which had been referred to me. Afterwards to Bunbury.

 

Thursday 11: At Betley in the morning with Eliza in the Gig, but Sr. Tho & Lady F not at home.

 

Friday 12: At home. writing &c.

 

Saturday 13: At Newcastle

 

Sunday 14: At home. Mr Bent relative to intended Brewery at Macclesfield &c.

 

Monday 15: Do. engaged on the farm. Alcock & his Son.

 

Tuesday 16: Do. unwell. Letter to Stanford.

 

Wednesday 17: At Stone attending Committee & General Assembly. Returned in the evening. Rudyard Reservoir 180 Acres.

 

Thursday 18: At home. Mr & Mrs Wedgwood & Dr Mrs & Miss Bent dined. Cut Asparagus.

 

Friday 19: At home. engaged on various matters. 

 

Saturday 20: Mr & Mrs Wedgwood left us. Took Mr W in the 

 

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Gig to Burslem viewing the engine &c from thence to Newcastle.

 

Sunday 21: At home. Mr Bent dined. Consultation relative to new Brewery.

 

Monday 22: Do. Engaged on various matters of business. Alcock. In the Evening Mr Skerrett & my two sisters arrived from Nantwich.

 

Tuesday 23: Do. Engaged with Mr S &c. Marking Trees for falling on Barlows Land & Linley Wood for Posts & Rails.

 

Wednesday 24: At Newcastle & breakfasted at Stoney fields in consequence of Letter received by Bent from Sr. Jno Heathcote. Finally determined to decline any connection with him. Returned to dinner. Cut Cabbage.

 

Thursday 25: At home  Ill behaviour of Robert. Engaged on Case of Audley copyholders. Afterwards with Mr Skerrett. Mr R Skerrett dined. Mr Rogersdyke.

 

Friday 26: At home. unwell & in the house all day.

 

Saturday 27: Do. Mr Skerrett at Nantwich. Prevented going to Burslem by letter received from Mr Wood with Account of a fever having broke out at Burslem. L. Dispensary! Turned ten milking cows out in the field before the house. In the night considerable fall of snow.

 

Sunday 28: At home. In the morning Mr De Manville who breakfasted & afterwards gave me in detail the Account of his unfortunate situation in respect to his Marriage & disputes with his wife & her mother. Informed me also of my being under a Defend. with him in one Suit & Plt. agt. him in another suit in Chancery. Left with me a subpoena & Draft of an answer. An interesting but most distressing Tale & which adds another melancholy instance of the miserable effects of unsuitable Matches. After he was gone which was in an hour or more after Breakfast perusing Draft. of Answer. Service as usual.

 

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Monday 29: At home. Engaged with Mr Skerrett on various matters. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 30: At Newcastle attending the Sessions. On the Bench & delivered Opinion of the Court on information at the Suit of Mr Coombes & Mr Butterfield for Articles of the peace. Both refused. Dined afterwards with the Mayor & in the evening addressed the Jury. On my return found Mr Swinton Holland. Conversation in the morning with Mr Bent relative to the Salopean Brewery when he informed that Sr. J Heathcote had entirely acceded to the terms of Copartnership which we had proposed.

 

May, Wednesday 1: Engaged in the morning with Mr Holland who with Miss Willett left us after an early dinner.

 

Thursday 2: At home. Engaged with Mr Skerrett & various matters.

 

Friday 3: Do. Mr Penlington & his son receiving his Rents &c. Mr P & Mr W. P & Mr & Mrs R Skerrett dined.

 

Saturday 4: At Newcastle Meeting Mr Philips of Macclesfield Brewery &c. Engaged all day, but the business not finally settled.

 

Sunday 5: At Congleton with Mr Bent, who had finally. . .[cloud] for the purchase. Meeting Mr W Hindley in order to consider of his becoming a partner in the proposed Macclesfield Concern. Long Conversation accordingly when he highly approved of the plan & the proposals made to him, & it was finally concluded that he should enquire whether his . . . would advance £2000 for him, in order to enable him to take a third Share in the Concern. J Bent & Mr Bagshaw dined.

 

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at the Inn on their return from Scotland.

 

Monday 6: Confined to the house with  violent cold. Considering & sketching out heads of an Agreement for establishment of a Brewery by Sr. J E Heathcote & the Newcastle Brewery at Shrewsbury. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 7: At Rode heath meeting Mr Lockett in order to agree for a Lease to him of House & Land now in the holding of J.Sherrin & the terms of which Sr. Th. Broughton had on his part informed to me, & finally agreeing for the same £56 a year Mr . . .[Pallringent] of his share £5 a year for the garden.

 

Wednesday 8: At home.

 

Thursday 9: At Newcastle meeting Sr. John E Heathcote & finally settling relative to the creation & establishment of a Brewery at Shrewsbury. Dined at Stoney field & returned in the evening. M Fritche.

 

Friday 10: At Newearth again with Mr Skerrett looking over the Brewery & afterwards dined at Mr R Skerret.ts.

 

Saturday 11: At home. Engaged with Mr Skerrett.

 

Sunday 12: Do. Sketching out heads of his will & proposing minutes for the instruction of his attorney Mr Lowe.

 

Monday 13: At Burslem with Mr. Skerrett. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 14: Mr Skerrett & Ann & Bessy left Linley. Mr Bent & Mr Philips at dinner & finally agreeing with the latter for the purchase of Brewery at Macclesfield. Drawing Agreemt. &c. Mr Philips all night. Conversation on the printing trade.

 

Tuesday 14: At Newearth. Dined at Noah's Ark at opening of the Bowling Green.

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Engaged on the farm.

 

Thursday 16: At home. Engaged on the farm

 

Friday 17: Do.

 

Saturday 18: Mr & Mrs & two Misses Woods came to dinner. Engaged

 

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in the morning drawing Drft. of Agreement between Sr. J. E. Heathcote Mr Bent, self & J Barrow for establishment & carrying on of intended Brewery at Shrewsbury.

 

Sunday 19: At home. Service &c as usual. Cut a cucumber 

 

Monday 20: Do. Engaged with Mr Wood. Much conversation & Consideration relative to the putting down of the new Engine on Trevithicks principle for getting the Coals on the Bycars on the deep level & various other matters relating to the Manufactory &c.

 

Tuesday 21: At home. Finally settling & correcting Shrewsbury Brewery Agreement previous to taking it to Newcastle tomorrow.

 

Wednesday 22: At Newcastle with Agreement. Found Mr Bent just returned from Shrewsbury where he had made an advantageous Contract for a piece of Land for the purpose of the intended Brewery. Reading over Agreement with him. Returned to dinner & afterwards engaged with Mr Wood.

 

Thursday 23: At home. Engaged on various matters. Mr Ramsdyke.

 

Friday 24: Do. After dinner the Woods left Linley. Received in the evening from Manchester five pictures painted by Mr Rathbone & for which I had agreed when I was last there.

 

Saturday 25: At home. Letters &c.

 

Sunday 26: Do. Mr Henry Holland. Mr W Bent at dinner.

 

Monday 27: Engaged in the morning finally settling & then copying Drt. of Agreement relative to the Shrewsbury Brewery to be sent to Sir John Heathcote.

 

Tuesday 28: At home. Letter to Sir Jno H with Drt. of Agreement sent this day by servant Joseph. Engaged with Mr H Holland.

 

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Wednesday 29: At home, H Holland who left in the Evening

 

Thursday 30: At Burslem on various matters from thence to Newcastle to meet Mr Broadhurst of Mansfield. Dined with him at Mr Bents. Malting &c. Conversation on this subject. Application of Steam to pumping when he finally determined to meet me at Burslem in the morning to inspect the new Steam engines.

 

Friday 31: At Burslem meeting Mr Broadhurst, who after looking over the Manufactory Colliery &c returned with me to Linley Wood to dinner & staid all night.

 

June, Saturday 1: At Madeley attending Property tax Appeal & Meeting of Magistrates Sr. Tho Broughton S. J Chetwode & myself. Returned to Newcastle to a late dinner at the Roebuck where I met Mr Broadhurst & Mr Bent a long conversation again on the subject of Barley, various modes of Malting &c.

 

Sunday 2: At home.

 

Monday 3: At Newcastle. Brewery. looking over plans & Estimates of intended Buildings at Shrewsbury. Mr Sparrows relative to the Bill of lasts &c remaining due to the late Partnership of HC from Mr Henshall in Bucks affairs. Explaining the same &c. &c. Returned to dinner to meet Dr Mrs & Miss Crompton.

 

Tuesday 4: Engaged with Dr Crompton & Mr Johnson of Congleton who came to breakfast reading over the latter Case relative to the Manor of Audley & consultation on this business. Mr Fourchiquour [Monsieur Fouchècourt?].

 

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Wednesday 5: At home. Engaged on the farm & with Dr Crompton

 

Thursday 6: Do. Mr & Mrs Bilkington & Miss Beardmoth called & dined with whom engaged. In the evening Mr Fritch.

 

Friday 7: At Nantwich dining & spending the day with our whole party at Dysart Buildings.

 

Saturday 8: Returned from Nantwich. The Doctor left us on the road to go to Bortock.

 

Sunday 9: At home. In the Evening Stamford arrived on his return from Cambridge! 

 

Monday 10: Do.

 

Tuesday 11: Do. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 12: Do.

 

Thursday 13: Burslem

 

Friday 14: At home.

 

Saturday 15: At Congleton dining with Mr Johnson to whom I delivered the Drt. of the Case relating to the fines payable within the manor of Audley.

 

Sunday 16: At home. Mr Bent dined

 

Monday 17: At Newcastle by appointment with Mr Bent meeting Sr. Jno Heathcote in order finally to agree with the Builders from Shrewsbury relative to the erection of the intended Brewery &c but the latter did not come. On my return at Rode heath in consequence of Mr Penlingtons sudden illness & he was desirous to see me

 

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Tuesday 18: At Trentham attending Meeting - Assessed Taxes. Swearing in Assessors &c. Mr Steadman & self. On my return after dining at the Roebuck, at Stoney field meeting the Builders from Shrewsbury who had arrived late yesterday perusing & examining Estimates plans &c. & drawing long agreement. Returned home late. In the morning Mrs & Miss Crompton &c left Linley Wood.

 

Wednesday 19: In the house, Unwell

 

Thursday 20: Do. In the morning Mr Skerrett came from Nantwich with whom engaged. In the evening Mr Ramsdyke.

 

Friday 21: Do. Engaged with Mr Skerrett. In the evening Mr Wood. Long conversation relative to the settlement of the Burslem poor accounts which had been proposed to be referred to Mr Sparrow & me. This morning Labourers began clearing & levelling the old Pits in the Hollins grounds.

 

Saturday 22: At Madeley attending Property tax Meeting. Sr. Jno Chetwode Mr Mainwaring & self. Long & fatiguing day, much of the business falling on me which was hearing Appeals. returned to Newcastle to dinner about six or seven oClock.

 

Sunday 23: At home

 

Monday 24: At Stafford for the purpose of looking at a Postchaise belonging to the late Dr Campbell; not feeling satisfied any longer to withhold from my dear Eliza, an accommodation which I know she had often wished, and which I think she will long, very long enjoy. Stanford & I returned to dinner. Advantage & comfort of an early & steady perseverance in avoiding . . . appearance & expense. Fall on such occasions as this; Enabled to give a Son an University Education, & to supply a beloved wife with comfort & accommodation. Alcock

 

Tuesday 25: At home. Engaged with Burslem Poor Accounts. Mr Fourchiquour. Got early potatoes. Lateness of them.

 

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Wednesday 26: At home. Engaged on the farm & various matters.

 

Thursday 27: Engaged perusing correcting & arranging intended Report from the Committee for managing the Burslem Parish Affairs previous to the same being printed. In the afternoon at Burslem. From thence to Newcastle relative to Letter received from Mr W Hardman respecting Mr Hindleys becoming a Partner in the intended Macclesfield Brewery & the answer to be given thereto on which Mr Bent had requested to have my sentiments.

 

Friday 28: At home.

 

Saturday 29: At Betley calling on Sir Tho. Fletcher. Stamford & self. In the afternoon at Rode heath calling on Mr Penlington who was still much indisposed.

 

Sunday 30: 

July, Monday 1: [bracketed together] At Stoney fields from thence with Sr. Jno Heathcote & Mr Bent to Shrewsbury to inspect the ground & finally settle about the Building of the Brewery, which we accomplished on Monday morning. Found the situation extremely eligible, & the prospect of success very promising. Inhabitants of Shrewsbury about 15000. Returned to Newcastle by Hawkstone but it being very late when we arrived there I slept at the Roebuck.

 

Tuesday 2: At home. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 3: At Newcastle Races.

 

Thursday 4: Do. 

 

Friday 5: At home

 

Saturday 6: At Trentham attending Meeting Property tax. Appeals. Sr. John Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self.

 

Sunday 7: At home

 

Monday 8: At Macclesfield with Mr Bent looking over the Brewery agreed to be purchased from Mr Philips examining into probable supply of water &c & meeting Mr Hindley relative to his becoming a partner in the Concern.

 

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Tuesday 9: At home. Mr Blunt dined. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Joseph Dale to his service.

 

Thursday 11: Do.

 

Friday 12: The Mayor of Newcastle & Corporation Party dined. John Swinnerton Mayor, Sneyd, Bent, Sparrow, Smith, Nicksson, Ford, Hatton, Hill, Philips, Adams, Fenton, Miller.

 

Saturday 13: At Madeley attending property tax Meeting. Sirs Tho Fletcher, Jno Chetwode, Mr Mainwaring & self.

[rest of page taken up with pencil scribbles]

 

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Sunday 14: At home. Mr Bent dined. Macclesfield & Shrewsbury Concerns

 

Monday 15: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 16: At Trentham property tax. Sr. Jno Chetwode Mr Mainwaring & self. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Wednesday 17: At home. Engaged with Mr Fritche. Mr Fourchiquour. Alcock came to dinner. Musick. Began Hay Harvest.

 

Thursday 18: Do. Do. 

 

Friday 19: In the Evening with Miss Furnival at Newcastle. Mr Fourchiquour. Mr Fritche left Linley. Mr Peake arrived with Stamford from Stafford bringing with them the Carriage which I had purchased from the Representatives of the late Dr Campbell.

 

Saturday 20: At Betley with Mr Peake & Stamford dining at Sr. Tho Fletchers. Sir Tho Lady Harriet & two Miss Chetwodes & Mr & Mrs Mainwaring

 

Sunday 21: At home engaged with Peake

 

Monday 22: Do. Do. In the afternoon Mr Peake left us on his journey to Denbigh

 

Tuesday 23: At Trentham attending Meeting Property Tax and assessed Taxes. Detained long there(sic) being much business. Sirs Jno Chetwode & Thos Fletcher Mr Mainwaring Mr Kinnersley & self. On my return attending the Mayor of Newcastle it being the Sessions.

 

Wednesday 24: At home. Alcock

 

Thursday 25: Do.

 

Friday 26: At Newcastle dining at Stoney field & meeting Mr Hindley previous to Mr Bent & I going to Macclesfield tomorrow finally to arrange & settle with Mr Philips relative to the Brewery concern

 

[Saturday 27: although date not given on this page] At Macclesfield with Mr Bent when we finally settled with Mr Philips relative to the water &c. Proposal

 

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from Mr Cooke of Land for our Building. One penny per yard any quantity not less than 4000 yards with use of water. Returned to Congleton to dinner meeting Mr Hindley again.

 

Sunday 28: At home. Mr Abner Wedgwood relative to his brother Ralphs engagement with Mr Wood for taking orders &c.

 

Monday 29: At Burslem relative to R Wedgwood & consulting with Mr Wood relative to Letter I had received from Mr Tho Gilbert of Broughton with statement of his Claim to Clough Hall Estate &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 30: At home. Mr Fourchiquour. Mr Clarke relative to my assenting to the request of the Board to continue to act as a Commr. of the property tax which I agreed to do, & signed a Consent accordingly.

 

Wednesday 31: Do. Unwell. Engaged with accounts &c. In the Afternoon Mrs Hatsell & Mrs Heathcote. Mr Fritche.

 

August, Thursday 1: Do.

 

Friday 2: Do. Sir Tho Lady & Miss Fletcher Miss Moreton Mr & Mrs Sneyd of Darlaston & Mr & Mrs Bent & Miss Furnival dined.

 

Saturday 3: At home, In the forenoon at Rode heath calling on Mr Penlington & looking at alterations & repairs of Packhorse farm.

 

Sunday 4: Do.

 

Monday 5: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 6: At Blurton with Stamford calling on Mr Blunt. From thence to Butterton having met Mr Swinnerton in the morning, who was coming to Linley Wood to consult with me relative to the proceedings in Chancery &c. in the Causes respecting the Coal mines near Cheadle &c. Long conversation with him. Returned home to dinner. Violent storm of Hail, Rain, Thunder & Lightning.

 

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Mr Wm Penlington & Mr Fourchiquour at dinner. 

 

Wednesday 7: At home. In the Evening at Newcastle attending Play for benefit of the Dispensary

 

Thursday 8: At Rode heath with Mr W Bent looking over final Plans & estimates of Macclesfield Brewery which Mr Philips had brought & giving instructions for going on with the same.

 

Friday 9: Mr Peake with various Assessments Appointments &c under Property tax, Land tax & assessed taxes which I signed at Talk on the Hill, Mr P having met me there on my road to Burslem. Pirehill North hundred contains 87 Townships. The property tax amounts to about £12000. The assessed taxes not quite so much varying from about £10000 to 11 or 12000. The land tax was originally about £5000 but since the redemption is early about 3000. [Transcribers note: Staffordshire was divided into 5 administrative districts, or hundreds, of which Pirehill was by far the largest. The population of Pirehill increased by 2 ½ times between 1800 and 1850 much of which was due to the influence of the Potteries. Pirehill was further subdivided into North and South. The North contains Stoke on Trent, and Newcastle under Lyme.]

At Burslem relative to the Suits between Mr Swinnerton & James Wright & others, when the latter agreed that the question of the disputed Costs, the grounds of the present proceedings, should be referred to the original Arbitrators Sir John E Heathcote & Mr. . .[Baulligge] From Burslem to Etruria calling on Mr Jos. Wedgwood but he was not come. Returned to dinner. Wrote letter to Mr Swinnerton informing him of what had passed at Burslem.

 

Saturday 10: At home. Farm &c. In the evening Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 11: Do. Mr Bent dined.

 

Monday 12: Recommenced mowing. At Newcastle with Mr Skerrett. Returned to dinner.

 

Tuesday 13: At home engaged with Mr Skerrett perusing & examining Account which had been delivered by Mr Edleston between Mr Salmon & Mr Penlington. Finished mowing, Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 14: At home. Mr S. Mr Swinnerton with whom long conference relative to Wrights business he afterwards dined & left Linley on his road to Hoylake.

 

Thursday 15: In the morning Mr Collison relative to Mr Salmons Account. In the evening Mr S returned accompanied by Mary

 

Friday 16: At Trentham attending Property tax Meeting Mr Mainwaring & self. On return to Newcastle met Mr & Mrs Crompton of

 

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Chorley Hall & Mrs Poole on their road to Linley Wood where they dined & staid all night.

 

Saturday 17: At home. Engaged with Haymakers

 

Sunday 18: Do. Weather again very rainy

 

Monday 19: At Newcastle meeting Brig. Genl. Wood & Col Bromhead as a deputy lieutenant inspecting the following Volunteer Corps consisting of about 2000 men, together with their wagons &c & signing with him the necessary certificates for their Allowances. viz. Newcastle, Stoke, Lane End, Hanley, Etruria, Longport, Clough Hale & Betley & Audley. Memdm. the arms of the whole in very good order, which I may therefore report of necessary. Great Commendation bestowed by the Genl on these Corps. He told me that the French had no imagination that we possessed such a force as the Volunteers afforded. Returned to dinner. Summoned at Newearth to attend a special Jury at the Assizes at Stafford in a Cause between the Wyrely & Essington Canal Proprs. . . . & Bentley . . .[Deft] Busy & fatiguing day. NB If Waggons(sic) appropriated for the transportation of Volunteers are marked, the proprietor is liable to the penalty for their non attendance when required, otherwise not.

 

Tuesday 20: At Burslem Looking at new Steam engine &c &c.

 

Wednesday 21: At home. Engaged in the Hay & in various matters previous to my going to the Assizes having been summoned on another special Jury Cause Streatford & Bamford.

 

Thursday 22: At Stafford. Served on the Grand Jury. Sir Edwd. Littleton Foreman. Dined with the Judges. Ld Vanborough & Mr Justice Lawrence. Long Conversation with the latter. On Friday served on special Jury Streatford & Bamford Sr. Rob Pill Foreman Messrs Foyer, Walhouse, Webb, Spode & self special Jurors. A complicated Cause involving questions of Law v fact & effecting much valuable property. After much discussion between Lord Vanborough & the Council relative to making a case for the opinion of the Court of the Kings Bench

 

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It was finally proposed by both Plaintiff & Defendant to leave the whole to me, this being thought by the Judge a very proper subject for a Reference. Undertook the reference on having Mr Gilbert appointed to assist me in the Colliery questions, & leave to refer to Counsel on any points of Law on which I might entertain any doubts. Dined with the Sherriff & returned home late at night. The Wyreley & Essington Cause on which I had been summoned did not come on.

 

Saturday 24: At home. Found the Hay harvest finished. Engaged on the farm. Letters &c. &c. Memdm. Mr Meeke of Dunstall informed me yesterday that he milks 35 true longhorned(sic) Cows. That his family consist of 25 persons, after supplying whom with Butter, Cheese, Milk &c he makes 3.2 Cwt (120 lbs to the Cwt) from each Cow for the Factor [land agent] and that the whole of his pasturage is only 52 ½  Acres or 3 Acres to 2 Cows. That he never suffers his milking Cows to taste the aftermath [in this context JC means 'after-grass' - grass which grows after the first crop has been mown for hay, or grass growing in stubble after a corn harvest], as it endangers their casting the calf.

 

Sunday 25: At home. Mr Moreton from Etruria for my opinion & advice relative to his Claim to Lands in Wolstanton as Heir at Law to the late Red. Mr Moreton ded.

 

Monday 26: At Nantwich. Took Miss Stamford in the Gig & brought Mary back. Consented to let Salmons & Penlingtons Account business stand over till after Chester Assizes, as requested by Mr Edburton.

 

Tuesday 27: At home. Mr Blunt Mr H Heathcote & Mr Tho. Bent dined. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 28: Do. Engaged on the farm. In the Evening Mr Fritche. In the morning sent for by Miss K Penlington who I found dangerously ill at Mr Collinsons.

 

Thursday 29: At home. Engaged on the farm &c. &c.

 

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Friday 30: At Trentham attending Meeting Assessed Taxes Appeal. Sirs Jno. Chetwode Tho. Fletcher, J G Heathcote Mr Stedman & self went through the Appeals chiefly myself & Mr Stedman. In the morning looked at the Improvements making(sic) by Lord Stafford. Returned late to dinner.

 

Saturday 31: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

September, Sunday 1: Do.

 

Monday 2: Do. Alcock. Engaged with the workmen in the House.

 

Tuesday 3: Do. Mr Fourchiquour. Do.

 

Wednesday 4: At Basford dining. Messrs. Tollet, Swinnerton &c. Long conversation with Mr T on the Corn Laws. [The first corn law was introduced in 1804 to impose a duty on imported corn and thus protect the profits of landowners. During the Napoleonic Wars importation of corn was impossible resulting in an expansion of British wheat farming and higher bread prices.]

 

Thursday 5: Attending Funeral at Lawton of the late Miss K Penlington. At Rode heath calling on Mr Penlington

 

Friday 6: At home. Mr Wood came to dinner Mr Bill relative to Newcastle Marsh Land & Accounts.

 

Saturday 7: Do. Engaged in Accounts &c. &c.

"The laws concerning Corn may every where be compared to the Laws concerning Religion. The people feel themselves so much interested in what relates either to their subsistence in this life, or to their happiness in a life to come, that Government must yield to their prejudices; and in order to preserve the public tranquillity, establish that system which they approve of. It is often this account perhaps, that we so seldom find a reasonable system established with regard to either of these two capital objects."    Wealth of Nations

                                                                                             4º Vol. 2 p. 128

[Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith pub. 1805; a book in the library of JC.  This 3 vol set still exists in the Heath-Caldwell archive]

 

Sunday 8: At home.

 

Monday 9: At Newcastle on various matters

 

Tuesday 10: At home. Mr Fourchiquour. Engaged on the farm & grounds

 

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Wednesday 11: At Nantwich attending the funeral of Mr Thos Jackson, who had appointed me one of his Executors. Returned home in the evening.

 

Thursday 12: Mr Garnett, Mr Yoxall & Mr Skerrett came to dinner Mr Bent & Mr R Skerrett also dined.

 

Friday 13: At Burslem with the gentlemen looking at the Manufactory Steam engines &c. Mr W Garnett & Mr Thos Yoxall dined.

 

Saturday 14: Engaged in the morning with the gentlemen looking at the farm improvements who dined & left us in the Evening.

 

Sunday 15: At home

 

Monday 16: At Newcastle attending Meeting relative to the proposed Railroad from the Newcastle canals to the Nantwich Canal, when sundry Resolutions were entered into when Mr Tollet (who was Chairman) & I were deputed to communicate to a Meeting of the Trustees of the Newcastle & Nantwich Turnpike Road appointed to be held tomorrow at Betley. Afterwards dined at Mr Bents with Messrs Chas Hamilton, Chamberlaine & Fletcher from Chester & Messrs Tollet &c. Returned in the evening bringing Mr Tollet with me to Linley Wood.

 

Tuesday 17: At Betley with Mr Tollet attending Meeting & making the Communication from the Newcastle Meeting Red. Sir Th. Broughton in the Chair when it was resolved that Surveys & estimates should be prepared by Mr Fletcher of Chester & another Meeting held on the 9th Nov for taking the same into consideration. Returned to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 18: At home. Unwell. Wrote Letter to Sir John Chetwode with a Copy of the Resolution of these Newcastle & Betley Meetings.

 

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Thursday 19: At home. Engaged in various matters

 

Friday 20: Do. Finished Corn Harvest.

 

Saturday 21: At Newcastle on reference with Mr Hill of the matters in dispute between Mr John Turner & Mr Wm. Chell. Engaged all Morning which was very hot. Afterwards dined with Mr Sparrow at the Grapes it being the . . .[leasing] day & returned in the Evening.

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: At Newcastle Mr Bent relative to the payment of the purchase Money for the Land at Shrewsbury &c. From thence to Stone attending Committee Meeting.

 

Tuesday 24: At Stone Genl. Assembly. Appointed one of a select Committee for meeting Delegates from Staffordshire & Worcestershire Canal on the 7th Oct at Penkridge relative to the notes of Tonnage charged on that Canal. Also of another Committee to meet at Wolesley Bridge on the 29th Oct for considering of proposed new arrangements of the Carrying Trade &c, Returned in the Evening bringing Mr Bent on his road to Macclesfield & settling various matters with him, particularly to accept lease for a . . .[try] term of years of a Piece of Land from Mr Cooke with a view to being provided with a situation for a Brewery on the expiration of the Lease bought from Philips.

 

Wednesday 25: At home.

 

Thursday 26: Do. unwell

 

Friday 27: Went with Eliza to Nantwich

 

Saturday 28: At Nantwich

 

Sunday 29: Returned from Nantwich. Found Miss Bents at Linley Wood & Mr W Bent. Brewery. Shrewsbury & Macclesfield.

 

Monday 30: At home. Engaged on the Farm & various matters

 

October, Tuesday 1: At Stafford calling on Lord Stafford; afterwards

 

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dining with Mr Swinnerton the late Mayor at Newcastle at his annual Feast at the Roebuck. Returned in the Evening.

 

Wednesday 2: At home. Engaged with the Garden making alteration at the entrance into the wood & at the farm.

 

Thursday 3: Do. Engaged on various matters

 

Friday 4: Do. Unwell confined all day to the house. Recd. a very obliging Note from Lord Stafford & Lady Stafford with Invite to dinner on Monday next.

 

Saturday 5: Do. Stanford returned from Nantwich, bringing with him Mr. Henry Tomkinson Junr. who dined & returned in the Evening. A very pleasing young Man

 

Sunday 6: At Newcastle attending the Mayor. At Church in the forenoon. dined & returned to Linley Wood in the afternoon.

 

Monday 7: In the Morning engaged in the farm &c. Dined at Trentham. Party. Lord & Lady Stafford. Lord Gower & Lady Charlotte. Col. Grenville & Mr. Murray Nephew of the Duke of . . .[blot on page] Sr. John and Mr. Heathcote. Mr. Butt and Mr. Philips an Artist. Dr. and Mr. Tho. Bent and Self. A very agreeable day, evening more & more the good disposition of this family towards myself Lady Stafford impressing on my coming away her regret that from the state of their house & it being full she could not offer me a bed, but hoping that I would . . .[take] me the next time that I visited them

 

Tuesday 8: At home

 

Wednesday 9: At Newcastle attending Agricultural Society Meeting. Proposed Mr. Keymer of Eaton Hall as a Member who was unanimously voted on accordingly.

 

Thursday 10: Dined at . . .[Daddlinford] with Mr. Broughton. Mrs Tollet & Mr. Armistead

 

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Friday 11: At Burslem. Mr. Wood at the Sessions at Stafford

 

Saturday 12: At home. Engaged on the Farm &c. 

 

Sunday 13: Do.

 

Monday 14: At Burslem again on various matters. New pattern of printed ware & mechanical Methods of doing the Ground. Returned by Longport & called at Mr. Henshalls.

 

Tuesday 15: At home

 

Wednesday 16: At Newcastle. Brewery concerns. Macclesfield &c.

 

Thursday 17: At home. In the Evening. Dr. Crompton

 

Friday 18: Do. Mr. Bassnett. Mr Cox to whom I delivered the Documents relating to the Boundaries of the Manor of Lawton.

 

Saturday 19: At Madeley attending Meeting of Commr. under the new Property tax Act. Swearing in Assessors &c. Went through the business myself, Mr. Mainwaring being with me to make two Commrs. Fatiguing Day. Srs. John Chetwode Tho Broughton & Mr. Fletcher attending as Magistrates. Conversation with Sr. Jno Chetwode relative to an Information threatened to be laid by Mr. Fletcher agt. Mr. Gibbons for being out with Stanford. Sr. Jno engaged to dine & sleep here with Lady Harriet on Thursday the 7th Nov. Returned to a very late dinner.

 

Sunday 20: At home. Writing long Letter to Sir Jno Chetwode relative to the dispute with Mr Fletcher.

 

Monday 21: At home. Writing Letters &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 22: At Cheadle attending reference with Mr. Richd. Smith on the Affairs of Mrs Tomlinson & her Son & which I had the satisfaction to put in a train likely to be satisfactory to all parties and for which they confessed the greatest gratitude &c.

 

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Thursday 22: Late at night & between 11 & 12 oClock began to read Brief consisting of 49 papers closely written in the . . . special Jury Cause of Mountford & Bamford referred to me at the last Stafford Assizes; having appointed a conference at 8 oClock the next morning with the Attorneys Mr. Blag of Cheadle, & Mr. Blair of Uttoxeter on this business.

 

Wednesday 23: Mr Blag and Mr Blair attended accordingly, when I had the satisfaction to find that I had made myself Master of the Case and had distinguished the true points, Both gentlemen concurring on a wish that I would consider it in the same point view that I had stated to them & decide accordingly. On a further explanation with them I did owing the necessity of any Witnesses attending in the final reference by which much expense & trouble to the Parties would be spared & have the satisfaction to hope that I shall be able finally to settle this important Case justly & satisfactorily. On my return dined at Mr. Walthalls at Newcastle with Mr Bent Mr Furnival &c & on my arrival at home found a very handsome reply from Sir John Chetwode to my Letter written on Sunday last.

 

Thursday 24: At Mare hall dined & staid all night.

 

Friday 25: Came to Newcastle & commenced an oral examination & settlement of Brewery Accounts. Slept at Mr Bents.

 

Saturday 26: Closely engaged all day on Do. Finally settled the same and returned home in the Evening.

 

Sunday 27: At home.

 

Monday 28: Do. Engaged with Workmen making Alterations at the Entrance into the Turnpike Road. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 29: At Wolesley Bridge attending meeting of committee appointed to consider of the Carrying Trade. Mess. Sparrow, Col. Sneyd, Lester, Simpson, Webb & Self. Returned in the Evening.

 

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Wednesday 30: At home. Mr. Eardley with Abstract of Title to Estate purchased from Revd. Mr. Salmon for my perusal on his behalf.

 

Thursday 31: At Burslem on various Matters.

 

November, Friday 1: In the Morning engaged on various Matters. Dined at the Red Bull Lawton Mayoralty.

 

Saturday 2: At Cheadle finally concluding reference in Tomlinsons Affairs, and which we had the pleasure to do to the great satisfaction of all parties. Very late before we finished and detained all night.

 

Sunday 3: Returned from Cheadle to dinner 

 

Monday 4: At Stoney fields with Eliza calling on Miss Furnival. Engaged afterwards at the Brewery.

 

Tuesday 5: At home. Engaged in the Grounds &c. Mr. Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 6: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 7: Sir Jno. Lady Harriet & Miss Chetwode, & Mr. & Mrs Wedgwood dined and stayed all night. Intelligence of great naval Victory obtained by Lord Nelson & his death. [Transcribers note: Actual date of death 21st October 1805, news reached Britain on 6th November]

 

Friday 8: Attending with Sir John Chetwode the Meeting at Betley relative to the intended Rail Road from Sir. F. Gresleys Canal to Nantwich which was numerously attended, & the measure determined upon of a Subscription opened. Sir. F Gresley T Broughton (in the Chair) John Chetwode, Jno Heathcote, Mr. Crewe, Tollet &c. &c. Returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 9: Mr. & Mrs. & Miss Furnival of Sandbach Mr. & Mrs. Miss S Sparrow, & Mr. and Mrs. W Bent & J Swinnerton dined

 

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Sunday 10: At home.

 

Monday 11: Do. Engaged on the Grounds & with Case relative to the Fines payable within the Manor of Audley previous to my going to Newcastle tomorrow to inspect the old Court Rolls &c. Alcock

 

Tuesday 12: At Newcastle inspecting and examining with Mr. Tho. Fenton the ancient Rolls & entries of the Manor of Audley. Dined with him. Sparrow, Sneyd, Bent, Bagshaws. Returned at night

 

Wednesday 13: At home. Finishing Drat. of Case for the opinion of Counsels

 

Thursday 14: Do. Engaged on the Grounds. In the Evening attending Newcastle Assembly with Family. Eliza & Mary meeting us on their return from the Revd. Mr Robinsons & Mr. Tollets where they went yesterday.

 

Friday 15: At home. Marquis and Marchioness of Stafford called. Polite & affable behaviour. Seeming to aim only at conveying pleasure and disclaiming all deference.

 

Saturday 16: At Burslem pursuant to appointment Meeting Mr. Martin & examining and considering the &ldots; instances relative to Mr. John Gullimore having occasioned a fire in his Works, by which negligence great injury done to ours: when I finally directed an Offer to be made to him of the Coals which he had deprived us of getting at a fair valuation, and if this not accepted an Action to be brought. New Engine in the works for the first time set to work.

 

Sunday 17: At home.

 

Monday 18: Do. Engaged in various matters. Mr Edleston relative to the Nantwich Railroad. Mr. Penlington. Alcock who staid all night in the Evening Musick.

 

Tuesday 19: At home. Perusing new Property tax Act previous to the Meeting at Madeley. Writing Letters to various persons. Mr. Fourchiquour

 

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Wednesday 20: At home. Mr Fritche

 

Thursday 21: In the Morning at Burslem. New Engine &c, Gullimores business &c. Mr Wood returned with me - Mr Atkinson came to dinner

 

Friday 22: Mr John Burton called & took Mr Atkinson on their Journey to London. Settling with Mr Beardmore. Return & Assessment under Property tax Act.

 

Saturday 23: At Madeley attending Meeting under Property tax Act for receiving Assessments. Business done by Mr Mainwaring & Self. Sir Tho. Broughton John Chetwode & Tho Fletcher Justice business. Returned to dinner late after a fatiguing day.

 

Sunday 24: At home

 

Monday 25: Do.

 

Tuesday 26: Do.

 

Wednesday 27:Went to Manchester joined Mr Bent at Marshfield . . . to Mr Jas Harmans having staid behind in consequence of the accounts received of the illness of Miss Stamford of London. Dined & slept at Somerville. Col Ackers & . . .[Leaf.] Wm Hardman &c.

 

Thursday 28: Received Letter by Joseph with an account of the dangerous state of Miss Stamford & her wish to see us. Set off immediately & arrived in the Evening but the Post brought an Account of Miss Stamford's death.

 

Friday 29: Set off this morning to London. Elizath Miss S & self.

 

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[No date]

In London from Sunday 1st Decr. to Thursday 28[crossed out] 27 when Stamford who had joined us from Cambridge Eliza & self set off on our return & arrived at Linley Wood on Saturday Evening the 29.

 

Sunday 30: Mr W Bent. Mr Handley & Mr Wood dined

 

Monday 31: At home.

 

[Rest of page blank] [JC had made a mistake with the days here 27th Dec was a Friday, 28th Saturday, thus he actually left London on Thursday 26th]

 

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Tuesday 31: New Year commenced. At home. Engaged in various matters in consequence of my absence from home, answering Letters &c,.

 

1806, January, Wednesday 1: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 2: Do. and on the farm

 

Friday 3: Do.

 

Saturday 4: Do. Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 5: Do. In the afternoon Mr Wm Kinnersley requesting me to act as his Referee in the Execution of the late Mr Jos. Blackwall in a dispute with Mr Andrew Blackwall which I finally consented to do. Mr R Skerrett.

 

 

Monday 6: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 7: At Newcastle dined at Dr. Northern Eliz Bessie & I Mr & Miss Basnett Mrs Swinnerton Sneyd & L Northern

 

Wednesday 8: At home

 

Thursday 9: Do. In the night violent Storm of wind

 

Friday 10: Me Edwd. Powys Dr & Capt Northern & Mr Sneyd of Beadwell dined. High wind

 

Saturday 11: At home

 

Sunday 12: Do.

 

Monday 13: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 14: At Newcastle with Stamford Meeting Mr Robinson of Stone on various Navign Matters when he intimated to me the wish of the Proprietors for me to take the Office of one of the select Committee for managing the Affairs of the Navigation in the room of Mr Philips

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Engaged settling last years Accounts &c.

 

Thursday 16: Do. Do.

 

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Friday 17: At home. Stamford prevented setting off to Cambridge by the Non arrival of the Mail which had been stopped by the floods.

 

Saturday 18: At home. Mr Hindley at Breakfast on his way to Macclesfield.  . . .[consulting] on various matters relative to the Agreements with Philips &c. Engaged with Accounts &c. &c. very close.

 

Sunday 19: Do.

 

Monday 20: At Trentham Attending Lieutenancy Meeting. Appeals Militia & Levy on Massc. Engaged all day Sir Jno. Chetwode Mr Mainwaring, Kinnersley & self

 

Tuesday 21: At home. I this day compleated(sic) the 47 year of my age. It gave rise to abundance of good resolutions, as to making the greatest & best use of time which seems every year passing with increased swiftness but I had the happiness to reflect, & to hope at least, that the last year had not been spent without a fair and reasonable discharge of duty both public & private.

 

Wednesday 22: At home. Engaged on the farm & various Matters.

 

Thursday 23: At Trentham again attending Meeting under the Assessed Taxes - Appeals - Sirs Jno Chetwode, J Fletcher, J Heathcote & self. A long, laborious, & fatiguing day having left home at 8 in the morning & not getting back till near 7 at night without any rest or refreshment. Sirs Jno Chetwode & J Fletcher left early.

 

Friday 24: At home. Engaged with Mr Gilbert pursuant to appointment perusing Briefs & Papers, & considering the Case of Banford & Mountford being the special Jury Cause referred to us from the last Stafford Assizes. An almost perfect coincidence in the opinion which we had without any previous Communication with each other found in this business. Mr Gilbert & Mr Wood dined. The latter staid all night

 

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Saturday 25: At home. Engaged on the farm in the morning. Afterwards with Mr Penlingtons Tenants receiving Rents, sorting Acct of Repairs &c. &c. Mr P & his son dined.

 

Sunday 26: At home.

 

Monday 27: [no entry]

 

Tuesday 28: [no entry]

 

Wednesday 29: [no entry]

 

Thursday 30: To Oakley. Elizabeth, Eliza & self. In the Evening at Drayton Assembly.

 

Friday 31: At Oakley. Mr & Mrs Taileur & Mr Butt dined. Mr Butt mentioned Lady Staffords wish to attend the Races at Newcastle, if the time were convenient, on which I undertook to consult the gentlemen of the Town as to postponing the Races to August. Very pleasant day.

 

[1806] February, Saturday 1: Returned home much gratified with the very kind & friendly treatment we had received from Sir Jno & Lady Harriet at Oakley. Found Mr Bent at Linley on his Return from Macclesfield. Brewery &c. &c.

 

Sunday 2: At home.

 

Monday 3: Mr & Mrs Bayley of Wheelock, Miss Furnival & Mr Fourchiquour with Alcock & his son dined. In the Evening Musick.

 

Tuesday 4: At Newcastle. Dined with Mr Bent at Stoney fields when the postponement of Newcastle Races discussed & approved. Dr. Bent Mr Sneyd, Pooh, Harwood there I undertook to see Mr Butt, in order that hw might write to Lady Stafford.

 

Wednesday 5: At home. Perusing Briefs &c. in Mountford & Banford

 

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Thursday 6: At Trentham calling on Mr Bent, who said he would write to Lady Stafford by that nights Post. Returned to Newcastle & attended Agricultural Society Meeting. Proposed Mr Paterson of Congleton as a member who was Voted accordingly. From Newcastle to Cheadle with Mr Gilbert in the reference Mountford & Bamford.

 

Friday 7: At Cheadle. Writing up opinion on Mr Rd Gilberts Marriage Settlement. Mountford v Bamford Engaged on this reference. Leigh & Blagg giving opinion & advice on modest Settlement of Partnership Accounts which they had referred to me. . . .[Chairing] Smith Swinnerton agt. Wright & others. &c. &c. Hard day. not getting to rest till between 1 & 2 oClock, & having been engaged from 9 in the Morning. Perfect agreement between Mr Gilbert & Self as to Award in Mountford & Bamford, but enlarged the time for making it.

 

Saturday 8: Returned home. 

 

Sunday 9: At home. Mr Hindley Macclesfield concerns &c.

 

Monday 10: Do. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 11: At Newcastle Brewery. Further consideration of alteration of Newcastle Races when I wrote to Sir Henry Mainwaring on the subject & to know whether August would be convenient to him. Elizabeth & I signed Answer in Chancery De Manville agt. Crompton & os[others]. Returned to dinner

 

Wednesday 12: At home. Mr Skerrett. Wrote to Dr Crompton with the answer in Chancery Mr Smith of Tunstall advising relative to the action . . . agt him by the Mayor & Co

 

Thursday 13: Do. Dr & Mr Blunt who dined.

 

Friday 14: Do. Engaged arranging Books &c.

 

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Saturday 15: At Tunstall meeting Mr Martin at Mr Smith by appointment perusing papers & considering the Case between the Navigt. Co. & Mr Smith relative to water taken by the Co. from Croxton Mill &c. when I promised to speak to Mr Sparrow on the business & endeavour to get the proceedings in the Action stayed, in the hope that the business might be amicably settled. From thence to Burslem. returned to dinner.

 

Sunday 16: At home. Mr Wedgwood relative to my inspection of the terms of the Etruria Corps which we fixed for Friday 21.

 

Monday 17: At Newcastle inspecting with Mr Kinnersley as a Dep. Lieutenant the arms belonging to the Newcastle Volunteers. Afterwards attending Meeting at the Public Office relative to the postponement of Newcastle Races to the 1st Week in August, which was unanimously agreed to, & I was desired to write to Lord Gower on the subject. From thence attending Meeting of Maltsters at the Roebuck relative to Petition to Parliament for repeal of the Restrictions on the wetting of Malt, & drawing up Letter to be sent to the Gentlemen at Stafford relative to the allegations contained in the Petition as to the diminution in the manufacture of Malt & defalcation in the Revenue & suggesting the propriety of carefully avoiding any . . . statement. From thence to Mr Sparrows meeting Mr Martin relative to the business Navigt. Co v Smith when Mr S consented to stay the proceedings in the Action in order that the matter might be settled by two . . .[ professional] Men. Returned home to dinner. Alcock. In the evening writing Letter to Lord Gower.

 

Thursday 18: At home. Perusing & considering Case which I had received from Mr Tomlinson of Hanley & referred to me by Mr Woolfe and Mr Mason relative to Lease determinable after Peace between Great Britain & France & inviting my Opinion thereon with Letter to Mr Tomlinson. In this opinion I made the following Distinctions

"I conceive that there is a material difference between a Preliminary Treaty, a Definitive Treaty, and the Ratification of a

 

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Treaty of Peace between two Nations. A Preliminary Treaty I understand to be, what the term itself imparts, preparatory or introductory only, relating chiefly to the forms and manner of the Negotiation, such as the times and place for beginning the Conferences, the delivery of the propositions &c. with perhaps the general Outline and Basis of such Propositions. And the History of modern Europe affords abundant instances of these Preliminary Treaties having occasioned much trouble and loss of time before the main Business could be proceeded upon. The Treaty is the adjustment of the differences themselves; and when these are finally settled, agreed upon and signed, the Treaty becomes a Common Public Instrument, or Definitive Treaty and it may then be properly said that Peace has been concluded. The Ratification is the particular or private Act of the Parties to the Treaty; and what gives it perfection and security, being the formal Avowal or Confirmation by the Principal of what had been previously done by his Delegate: and though it is I think held that this is not essential to the Treaty but that it would be good and binding without it, yet I believe in general Treaties are not published till after the exchange of the Ratifications."

Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 19: At home. Engaged in arranging Books and Papers. Afterwards laying out additions to the Garden at the farm &c. &c.

 

Thursday 20: For the first time this Season out coursing about 3 hours. Excellent Running. . . .[Senoaher] maintained the Credit of his Breed, and showed a decided Superiority. Afterwards engaged in various matters.

Friday 21: At Newcastle inspecting Arms belonging to the Etruria Corps of Volunteers. Afterwards at the Roebuck attending dispute between Lord Stafford & Executors of Mr Hollins, relative to Fixtures &c. in the House purchased by his Lordship, & which had been referred by all parties to me but Mr Butt not being there the final decision was adjourned. Returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 22: At Longport meeting Mr Kinnersley & inspecting Arms belonging to the Corps of Longport Volunteers & satisfying their numbers and Condition. Afterwards looking at Mrs Bruges Lease to enable me to determine  . . .[Laertion] as to the Window Tax, which had been referred to me by the Commissioners & Surveyor of the Taxes. Afterwards at Burslem. returned to dinner. In the afternoon Eliza returned from Nantwich.

 

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Sunday 23: At home. Service &c as usual.

 

Monday 24: At home. Engaged perusing & considering Draught of Lease from Mr Cooke of Macclesfield to Mr Bent & Co. of a piece of Land in Macclesfield & writing Letter to Mr Cooke. Afterwards engaged with the Gardener at the Farm. Letter to Mr Salmon relative to the letting of the House in Gower Street &c. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 25: At home. Engaged on various matters. Accounts &c. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 26: Fast day. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Thursday 27: At home. perusing Abstract of Mr Salmons Title to an Estate in Chatterley & Talk purchased by Mr Eardley of Talk & on which he had desired my Opinion & considering Mr Darlington's Replies to Objections. Engaged setting out extension to Farm Garden. Cold stormy day which prevented by going to Etruria to dine.

 

Friday 28: At Newcastle in consequence of a Letter which I had received from Lord Gower last night expressing his approbation of the alteration in Newcastle Races & his intention to attend. Settling with Mr Audley & Mr Smith the necessary advertisements for the Public papers &c. From thence to Trentham to have seen Mr Butt but he was from home.

 

[1806] March, Saturday 1: At home. Engaged ion the farm &c. Planted with my own hand the greatest part of the hedge surrounding the garden at the farm from the road round to the end of the Pond in the farm yard. Settled the Dft. of the Conveyance from Mr Meynell to me of Case of Freehold & Copyhold Lands.

 

Sunday 2: At home. Service as usual &c. &c.

 

Monday 3: Do. Engaged perusing papers & considering the proposed Alteration in respect to the carrying Trade on the Navign. previous to my attending the meeting appointed to be held at Wolesley Bridge on Wednesday next & drawing out observations. Alcock. Received

 

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my late friend Mr Hollins Tenor fiddle, which the Trustees and Executors had insisted upon my accepting as a Mark of respect.

 

Tuesday 4: At home. Navigation Papers &c. Finished planting what had been left undone of the new hedge at the farm. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 5: At Wolesley Bridge attending Navign. Committee Meeting. Carrying Trade &c. &c. Returned home at Night. Letter from Mr Bagshaw with a Request that I would write a Letter to the Members of the Borough requesting their Support in Parliament to the Maltsters Petition.

 

Thursday 6: Engaged perusing papers relative to the Maltsters Case writing Letter to the Members. Engaged in the Farm. In the Evening at Newcastle, when Mr Bent & I agreed that the Letter to the Members had better not be sent till the Committee of Maltsters were met in London. At Mr Martin's joining in proving the late Mr Thos Jacksons will as one of his Executors. Perusing Case & Mr Coasts opinion thereon relative to the power of the Magistrates to grant a Licence to Mr Wedgwood's house at Etruria late Billingtons which appearing to me to be erroneous, drawing up my own observations, which Mr Martin desired to send to Mr Coast along with the Case back for his reconsideration. At the Assembly Fixed with Mr Tomlinson for the Parties in the reference Wolfe & Mason to pay each his own Costs of the reference.

 

Friday 7: At home. Engaged a good deal on the farm. Irrigation. Letters writing &c. &c.

 

Saturday 8: At Burslem on various matters. From thence to Etruria calling on Mr Wedgwood relative to the execution of some Deeds to which as one of the Execors. of the late Mr Wedgwood I had been made a party. Returned to dinner.

 

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Sunday 9: At home. Service as usual. Mr Bent came to dinner. Brewery Concerns &c. &c.

 

Monday 10: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 11: Do. Engaged on the Farm. &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 12: Do. Accounts &c. &c.

 

Thursday 13: Mr Butt of Trentham Mr Blunt & Mr Wm Bent dined, the two former staid all night.

 

Friday 14: The morning being very stormy with Snow Mr Butt staid at Linley & with whom engaged.

 

Saturday 15: Mr Butt left Linley. Letter writing & various matters of business.

 

Sunday 16: At home. Service as usual

 

Monday 17: Do. Severe cold with Wind and Snow. Perusing & sketching Drft. of lease of House in Gower Street. Letter writing &c. &c. Alcock did not come.

 

Tuesday 18: [no entry]

 

Wednesday 19: [no entry]

 

Thursday 20: At home. Mr & Mrs Wedgwood & Miss Allen came to Linley.

 

Friday 21: Do. Engaged with the Wedgwoods.

 

Saturday 22: Do. Do. Farm &c. &c.

 

Sunday 23: Do.

 

Monday 24: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 25: Mr Wedgwoods family left us. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 26: Do. Engaged on various matters previous to setting off tomorrow to the Assizes.

 

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Thursday 27: Went to Stafford early. Served on the Grand Jury Heavy Calendar. S. Edwd. Littleton Foreman.

 

Friday 28: Discharged about one oClock. Land tax Commrs. Meeting. Came to Stone to dinner. Engaged with Mr Robinson on Navg. Affairs Carrying Business &c. Returned home at night.

 

Saturday 29:At home. Engaged on Farm &c. &c.

 

Sunday 30: At home. Service as usual. In the afternoon Mr Kindley called.

 

Monday 31: Do. Engaged writing long letter to Sr. Jno. Chetwode in reply to one which I had received from him relative to the Representation of the County in case of vacancy. Alcock.

 

[1806] April, Tuesday 1: At Burslem with Elizabeth in the Gig. Returned to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 2: At home, Mr Swinnerton of Butterton to prevail upon me to undertake the final Settlemt. of all  Disputes Chancery Causes &c. relative to the Delphonse Colliery & affairs which I agreed to do in case Mr Gilbert were joined with me in the Reference & the Parties would agree that we should begin de Nove[sic] [de Novo = anew]. Jos. Soragy relative to Prosecution of Rob. Podmore a Prisoner in Chester Castle by Mr Gilbert which appearing a hard case Memd. to speak to Mr Gilbert. Letter to Mr Swinnerton explaining the principle on which I would state the reference.

 

Thursday 3: In the morning at Clough Hall, calling upon Mr Gilbert when upon my representation he consented to undertake the reference with me on the principle aforesaid in my Letter to Mr Swinnerton. Viewed with him his House, Grounds &c. Promised to consider of Podmore Case.

 

Friday 4: At Newcastle Engaged with Mr Bent on the intended application to Parliament for repeal of the obnoxious restrictions in the Malting business previous to his setting off to London as one of the Delegates. Returned to dinner. In the afternoon Mr W Kinnersley on the reference which I had undertaken in the affairs of the late Mr John Blackwell. Perusing Copartnership Acct &c. &c. Letter from Mr Joseph Smith relative to the Disputes with the Navg. Co. &c. & considering the same.

 

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Saturday 5: Closely engaged all day perusing papers & considering the Question intended to be brought forwards at the Navigation Genl. Assembly next week as to the continuance & extension of the Carrying Trade & making Memdms. preparatory to drawing out Observations at some length on this important Question.

 

Sunday 6: At home. Service &c.

 

Monday 7: Engaged very closely all day drawing out & compleating(sic) Observations relative to the Carrying Trade on the Canal & the necessity for continuing it on the principles hitherto adopted but with such increased energy as recent Circumstances may have rendered necessary.

 

Tuesday 8 At Stone engaged all day on the Committee

 

Wednesday 9: Do. General Assembly numerously attended. Delivered my Sentiments at some length, & concluded by moving a Resolution for continuing the Trade on the System hitherto pursued but with such increased energy and activity as recent Circumstances & occurrences may have rendered necessary; and that a Committee be appointed to consider of the best means of carrying this Resolution into effect. This motion seconded by Jno Daniel Esq. who had hitherto uniformly voted for relinquishing the Trade, but who acknowledged that a change had taken place in his Sentiments from the reasons that had been stated, and carries unanimously. Returned home at night. Fixed with Mr Chatterley for Reference Ld. Stafford & Hollins Execrs. on Tuesday next.

 

Thursday 10: At home. Engaged on the farm &c. &c. Unwell

 

Friday 11: Having promised Mr Walhouse & Mr Lester to send them each a Copy of my Memoir on the Carrying Trade, correcting the same for that purpose. In the forenoon Mr Gilbert relative to Rob. Podmores prosecution: which he had desired his Atty not to . . .[defend] Circumstances being very favourable for the Prisoner.

 

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Saturday 12: At Newcastle to get Copies made of the paper on the Carrying Trade, Mr Beckett relative to sale of the Houses on the Marsh. Returned to dinner.

 

Sunday 13: At home. Service &c. &c.

 

Monday 14: Engaged finally correcting Copies of the paper on the Navigt. Carrying Trade, & afterwards writing Letters therewith to Mr Walhouse & Mr Lester. Alcock & in the afternoon a Mr Ward of Derby & Jas. Alcock. Musick.

 

Tuesday 15: At Newcastle attending on Reference between Lord Stafford & Exors of Mr Hollins. Revd. Mr Butt, Mr Chatterley Mr Griffin & Mr Fenton, when I had the pleasure to decide upon this business in a manner with which all parties expressed their satisfaction. Afterwards dined at Newcastle with a Party. Mr Swinnerton relative to his reference &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 16:At home. Engaged perusing papers & Accts relative to the Reference between the Exors of the late Mr Jno Blackwell deceased & Mr Andrew Blackwell, appointed for tomorrow. In the afternoon Mr Walthall & Mr Jos Adams. The former with Deeds for my execution relative to the Manor of Mere in consequence of my having been made a Justice in some former one & which I Executed Accordingly.

 

Thursday 17: Perusing Deeds which had been sent for my execution by Messrs Dennet & Grieves of London as one of the Exors of the late Mr Wedgwood & executing the same. Afterwards at Newcastle to have attended the Reference in Blackwells affairs, but found that the parties were not fully prepared Notice of which by some mistake had failed to reach me. Returned to dinner.

 

Friday 18: At home. Engaged on the farm & various matters. Enlargement of garden at Farm

 

Saturday 19: Do. Do. M Hindley Macclesfield Commrs. perusing various papers &c.

 

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Sunday 20: At home. Mr Bent & Mr Hindley came to dinner. Malt restrictions business. Macclesfield Deeds & papers &c. &c.

 

Monday 21: At home. Engaged on farm, Planting Cabbage for winter use for Cattle. 500d To Observe the Produce carefully. At Rode Heath meeting Sr. Thos Broughton. House at Rode Heath. Salmons Accounts &c. In the afternoon Jas. Gibbons relative to Removal of the Port Office to his House. Alcock

 

Tuesday 22: At home. Engaged compleating(sic) and copying out my will, the arrangements of which had engaged my thoughts for some time past. Of the three things that Aristotle is said to have repented him of, one was, " that he had lived one day not having his will made." Standings Hist of Philosophy. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

 

Wednesday 23: Do. Engaged on the Farm, Grounds &c. &c. In the evening Mr Fritche.

 

Thursday 24: Do. writing sundry Letters. Perusing various papers &c. &c.

 

Friday 25: Do.

 

Saturday 26: Do. Drawing Agreemt. . . . the Macclesfield Brewery. In the Evening Mr Wittenhall, canvass for vote in favour of Col. Parker, representing that Mr Wilbraham Egerton had declined offering himself for the County & had given his Interest to Col. Parker. At parting, told Mr W that I wished to be distinctly understood, that if Mr W G had offered I had made up my mind to give him any support in my power that I would make no promise adverse to Mr Davenport of . . .[Coffectham] should he chose

 

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to offer himself. That in respect to anybody else, I shall feel it right to see what was the wish & Sense of the County.

 

Sunday 27: At home. Service as usual

 

Monday 28: Do. Engaged on the farm & various matters

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Mr Fourchiquour. In the afternoon Mr Robinson Junr. of Stone with various cases Opinions & other papers relative to the Question of the hability of the Proprietors of the Canal to make compensation to the owners of Mines over which the Canal passes. When I appointed to meet Mr Robinson senr. at Newcastle on Monday next on the business.

 

Wednesday 30: Perusing & considering Navign. Papers left with me yesterday. Afterwards at Butterton dining returned in the Evening.

 

[1806] May, Thursday 1: Engaged again on Do. & various other matters.

 

Friday 2: Mr Harding of Betley to prevail upon me to undertake Reference of a Cause . . . & . . . & perusing papers. Afterwards at Burslem on a visit to Mr Woods family Elizth & self.

 

Saturday 3: At Burslem. Received Letter from Mr Cogney requesting me to act as his Arbitrator in the special Jury Cause Cogney & Stirrup which stood for trial at the Court Assizes but was referred & in consequence of his repeated  Request I consented to do. Returned from Burslem. Found Mr Sneyd had called to request my vote for Mr Davenport.

 

Sunday 4: At home. Service as usual

 

Monday 5: At Newcastle Meeting Mr Robinson of Stone on Navign. Affairs & particularly on the Case respecting Coals.

 

Tuesday 6: At Etruria. Dined & staid all night.

 

Wednesday &; Returned from Etruria

 

Thursday 8: Mr & Mrs Tollet  Miss Cope & Miss Smith dined & staid all night also Miss Powis & Miss Bent.

 

Friday 9: Engaged on various matters. Turned cows into field before the house.

 

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Saturday 10: At the Red Bull attending on the reference of the Cause Adams v Rider. K.B. [Kings Bench] which I had the satisfaction to settle satisfactorily to both parties. Making my award &c.

 

Sunday 11: At home

 

Monday 12: At Burslem. On my return planted with Hollies which had been sent to me by the Revd. Mr Hickin the north hedge between the two pools in the farm garden. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 13: Perusing & drawing observations on title & Conveyance to Mr Eardly of an Estate in Chatterley purchased from the Revd. Mr Salmon. Mr Peeke to fix a day for swearing in assessors appointed Tuesday 27 at Trentham Inn. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 14: At home. Mr & Mrs Wedgwood & Miss Allen dined.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mr & Mrs W & Miss A left us. Eliza Miss . . .[Pewis] & Miss Bent went to Manchester on a visit to Mr O Crewes.

 

Friday 16: Mr & Mrs Wood & 3 Miss Woods came to Linley; In the Afternoon much engaged with Mr Wood on Burslem & Colliery Concerns.

 

Saturday 17: At home. Engaged with Do.

 

Sunday 18: Do. Mr Hill relative to the dilapidations to be paid by Exors of late Mr Moreton & for my permission to nominate me as Referee to settle the same which I consented to. Application of Money under Talk on the Hill Brief &c. In the Afternoon Mr Wm Kinnersley relative to reference Blackwells Exors. & Andrew Blackwell.

 

Monday 19: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Maltsters relative to the opposition given by the Hertfordshire Maltsters & others to the relief promised by Lord . . .

& Ld. H Petty against the Restrictions

 

Page 355

on wetting Malt under 42Geo 3. Drawing up Resolutions &c. [There were a number of bills passing through parliament around this time relating to duties on malt, beer, ale etc. Many were repealed.]

 

Tuesday 20: At home. Very unwell. Mr Fourchiquour. In the afternoon Mr Woods family left us.

 

Wednesday 21: At Newcastle Meeting Mr Chawser Mr Cogney's Solicitor relative to the reference to Mr Kenwright . . . of the Spl. Jury Cause Cogney v Stirrup. Afterwards at the Shakespeare attending on Reference Blackwells Exors & Blackwell.

 

Thursday 22: At home. Still very unwell but engaged on farm &c. &c.

 

Friday 23: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 24: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 25: Do. Mr Hill dined. Talk on the Hill Brief Money. Delivd. to Mr Hill an Account of Dilapidations &c.

 

Monday 26: Do. Still very unwell

 

Tuesday 27: At Trentham attending Meeting assessed Taxes. Swearing in Assessors. next Meeting Tuesday July 1. On my return dined at Mr Kinnersleys.

 

Wednesday 28: At home. Dr Crompton & Edward who left us in the Evening. Mr Andrew Blackwell relative to Blackwell Arbitration & requesting my further Interference which I declined.

 

Thursday 29: At home

 

Friday 30: Do. Engaged on the business Mountford & Bamford.

 

Saturday 31: Do.

 

[1806] June, Sunday 1: At home

 

Monday 2: At Newcastle with Eliza Brewery &c. &c. Alcock

 

Tuesday 3: At home. In the forenoon at Clough Hall . . . attending Mr Gilbert on the business Mountford & Bamford & the Correspondence which had lately taken place between Mr Blair & myself. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 4: At home. In the Evening Mr Fritche.

 

Page 356 

Thursday 5: At Bostock fishing & looking over farms & Repairs &c. in the holding of Henshall & Beech, with Mr Penlington & Mr W Penlington who afterwards dined.

 

Friday 6: At home. considering Case Cogney & Stirrup. 

 

Saturday 7: At . . .[Werton] Cogney & from thence to the place in question meeting Mr Kenwright. Engaged all day but did not close the business Mr Stirrup being dissatisfied with the valuation made by Mr Thos. Heath & Mr Jno. Martin

 

Sunday 8: At home.

 

Monday 9: In the morning at Rode Heath meeting Mr Salmon & Mr Edleston on Mr Penlingtons Affairs. In the afternoon at Newcastle on various matters. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 10: Went to Nantwich with Elizabeth in the Gig

 

Wednesday 11: At Nantwich. Engaged with Mr Skerrett & Mr Edleston on Mr Penlingtons & Mr Salmons Acct & Affairs

 

Thursday 12: Returned home in the Evening.

 

Friday 13: At home.. Various Accounts &c.

 

Saturday 14: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 15: Do.

 

Monday 16: At Newcastle on various matters. Stamford returned from Cambridge

 

Tuesday 17: At home. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 18: At Newcastle again. Malting business &c. &c.

 

Thursday 19: At home

 

Friday 20: Went to Shrewsbury with Mr Bent

 

Saturday 21: Returned from Do.

 

Sunday 22: Mr Skerrett came to Linley, Penlington & other affairs.

 

Monday 23: Mr Thos. Garnett. Alcock. In the Evg. Mr Garnett & Mr Skerrett returned.

 

Page 357

Tuesday 24: prevented from going to Stone from being unwell

 

Wednesday 25: At home.

 

Thursday 26: At Macclesfield with Mr Bent looking over Brewery & various Concerns there. Returned in the Evening.

 

[No further entries until&ldots;]

Having been much engaged about this time on various matters this short journal was neglected.

 

[1806] July, Friday 4: At home. Mr Tomkinson dined

 

Saturday 5: At Betley, Dining at Sr. Thos. Fletcher

 

Sunday 6: At home.

 

Monday 7: At Newcastle Brewery &c. & various matters previous to setting off to Buxton tomorrow.

 

Tuesday 8: Set off to Buxton, Elizabeth, Eliza & self.

 

[no further entries until&ldots;]

 

Wednesday 23: Returned from Buxton

 

Thursday 24: At home. Engaged with various Letters & affairs which had occurred in my absence

 

Friday 25: Do. Do. Mr Jos. Wedgwood in the afternoon

 

Saturday 26: Hay Harvest

 

Sunday 27: Do. Mr Wood. Burslem affairs &c.

 

Monday 28: At home. Hay

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Do. Finished Hay Harvest

 

Wednesday 30: At home.

 

Thurs 31: At Trentham calling on Lord Stafford.

 

[1806] August, Friday 1: At Trentham Inn Attending Land tax Appeals. Afterwards dining at Lord Staffords. Lord & Lady Carlisle, Lord & Lady Cawdor , Col & Mr Sloane & Lady Gertrude Miss Byron. Lord Gower Lady Charlotte. A very pleasant & agreeable day. After Tea long walk in the Grounds & Gardens

 

Page 358 

Saturday 2: At Etruria with Stamford calling on Mr Wedgwood

 

Sunday 3: At home.

 

Monday 4: [no entry]

 

Tuesday 5: [no entry]

 

Wednesday 6: At Newcastle attending the Races. In the Evening at the Ball. Lady Stafford (to whom I introduced Stamford) Ld. Gower Mr Wm Booth.  Mr Sloane & Lady Gertrude &c. &. Returned home in the Evening

 

Thursday 7: Do. Do, Play

 

Friday 8: At the Loggerheads [village approx. 10m SW of Stoke] in the morning. From thence to Chippenhall Mill attending on . . . in a special Jury Cause to be tried at the ensuing Assizes relative to water course & irrigation. Fatiguing day. Mr Webb the only other special juror who attended. Returned to Newcastle Race Course about ½ past 6. Cold meal at Mr Basnetts. Returned home at night. Very numerous Meeting at the Races & (I think) great impression made by the courteous & wise behaviour of Lady Stafford & her party.

 

Saturday 9: At home. Recovering fatigue having been much exhausted with the exertions of the few foregoing Days.

 

Sunday 10: At home. Mr Bent & Mr Jno. Heathcote dined. Shrewsbury Concerns &c. &c.

 

Monday 11: At home.

 

Tuesday 12: Mr & Mrs Broughton dined & ['staid' omitted] all night  Mr Gilbert relative to Mountford & Bamford

 

Wednesday 13: Engaged with Mr Broughton who dined again being . . . by the Rain.

 

Page 359

Thursday 14: At Stafford, being not only summoned on the Grand Jury but on three Special Jury Causes. Had the satisfaction by an intimation of my sentiments to induce the parties Mr Hand of Abbots Bromley & Mr Jervis of the Hill near Dragton to consent to an amicable Settlement of the Cause on the . . . in which I had attended on Friday the 8; which was referred to myself Mr Harvey & Mr Wedge. I do not know that on any occasion I have better deserved the name of a Peace Maker, or that I had more happily seen the points of a Case.

 

Friday 15: Returned home. Dined at Stone

 

Saturday 16: At home. In the Evening Letter from Mr Wood in reply to one that I had written waiting for a Statement of our Concerns &c.

 

Sunday 17: At home.

 

Monday 18: Do. unwell. Alcock

 

Tuesday 19: At Trentham attending on Appeals under property tax. Sr. J Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Returned to dinner late

 

Wednesday 20: At Darlaston dining at Mr Sneyds. Mr Sneyd pastures 11 Acres of Land with Sheep, called Maf Sheep, which he gets from Wyken near Bridgenorth, from a person of the name of Bache. On this Land 60 Sheep, cost 16/- apiece in September which is the time for Caging them in.

s

Fleece on an Average4

Lamb Do.       1-

Carcase Do.       18

       212

Deduct Cost16

       116 pr head

 

Page 360 

Thursday 21: Returned from Darlaston. Heavy Rain. Mr Blunt dined. Consulting relative to Titles of Blurton & demand made by Lord Stafford. Letter from  Mr Harding with Account of Mr Tollet who had been ill & wished to see me. Letter from Mr Swinnerton who was returned from Monmouthshire & desired also to see me.

 

Friday 22: At home. Drawing Case for Opinion of Counsel for Sr. J Heathcote relative to property tax. 

 

Saturday 23: At Trentham attending Meeting Property Tax. Sr. J Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Delivered Case to the former. From thence to Swinnerton calling upon Mr Tollett & consulting relative to the intended new Turnpike & Rail Roads between Newcastle & Nantwich. Dined at Swinnerton. From thence to Butterton calling upon Mr Swinnerton various matters. Got home late & much fatigued.

 

Sunday 24: At home.

 

Monday 25: At Newcastle on various matters

 

Tuesday 26: At home, M Fourchiquour. prevented by indisposition from attending meeting at Madeley

 

Wednesday 27: Unwell. Severe cold. Mr Tollett came to dinner.

 

Thursday 28: Prevented attending Meeting at Betley with Mr Tollett relative to Turnpike & Rail Roads by indisposition.

 

Friday 29: Mr E Powys Mr J Bent Mr Butt with Miss Powys & 2 Miss Bents came to Linley.

 

Saturday 30: The young party at Mow Cop. Afterwards engaged with them.

 

Sunday 31: At home. Do. Do.

 

[1806]  September, Monday 1: At home. Messrs Powys Bent & Stamford shooting. Alcock but who went before dinner. Mr Butt came to dinner bringing Mr Cotman No. 107 New Bond Street an Artist in drawing who had been brought down by the Marq. & March. of Stafford to Trentham & who was going to take views of the old house at Moreton. [John Sell Cotman 1782 - 1842]

 

Tuesday 2: Mr Butt left us. Mr Cotman came again to Breakfast & dined after having made some beautiful sketches in black lead of the house. Staid all night. The young party left us in the morning.

 

Wednesday 3: At home. Harvest &c. &c. Marquis of Stafford & Lord Gower called.

 

Page 361 

Thursday 4: At Trentham attending Meeting to receive Lists of Militia preparatory to carrying into effect the Training Bill. General Licensing day. In the Hundred of Pirehill North 226 Public Houses. Dined. Sirs Thos Broughton, Jno. Chetwode. Tho Fletcher Mr Fletcher, Mainwaring, Whitworth, Steadman & self.

 

Friday 5: At home. Harvest &c.

 

Saturday 6: At Newcastle with Eliza. In the Evening received Letters from the Mayor & Town Clerk apprizing me that the Prince of Wales intended to visit the Borough &c. & desiring me to be in readiness to give my assistance on the occasion.

 

Sunday 7: At Newcastle this morning in consequence of the forgoing notification. Drawing Address to be presented &c &c Returned to Dinner.

 

Monday 8: At Newcastle again attending Meeting of the Corporation in the Town Hall on Motion for granting the Liberties & Privileges of the Borough to the Prince of Wales. Reading Drt. of the Address which I had prepared & which was warmly & Unanimously approved.

 

Tuesday 9: At home. Mr Fourchiquour. In the Evening received note from the Marquis of Stafford with Invitation to meet the Prince of Wales at Dinner at Trentham on Friday at 6 o'Clock. Mr Fourchiquour all night.

 

Wednesday 10: At Newcastle attending Meeting making arrangements for Reception of the Prince of Wales. Visit to Mr Tollets, which we had engaged to make tomorrow postponed Mrs Tollet being ill & Mr Sparrow who was to have been of the Party & myself unable to attend on Account of the Prince.

 

Thursday 11: At home. Various matters. Writing letters to the Mayor with various particulars to be attended to tomorrow.

 

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Friday 12: At Newcastle early. In the afternoon, between 3 & 4 o'Clock the Prince of Wales, attended by the Duke of Clarence, Marquis of Stafford, Lord Horrowly, Lord Petersham, Lord Crewe. Lord Granville Leveson Gower, Lord Chief Baron, Lord Gower, Honble. John Gilbert. Mr McDonald Mr Wilbraham, Col Leigh, Major Bloomfield, Mr Vernon Mr R Heathcote &c. arrived at the Town Hall: at the bottom of which they had alighted. A Green Baize had been laid along the Hall up the stairs & so all the way to the Hustings. The Corporation were arranged in one side, the Subjects on the other from the Bottom of the stairs to the Bottom of the Hall, the Senior Alderman being lowest, the Mayor & I with the Town Clerk & Mr Leigh the Clergyman stood at the foot of the Stairs. As soon as the Prince alighted, which he first did with the Duke of Clarence & Marquis of Stafford, we made an obeisance, then advanced half way, the Maces following us, & made another, when we approached him a third was performed. The Subjects & Aldermen then formed in procession & walked first up the stairs, The Maces followed, then the Mayor & I with the Town Clerk & Clergyman. The Prince with the Duke & Marquis followed. Having conducted the Prince to the Hustings which he ascended with the Duke, His R.H. & having called up Lord Stafford the Town Clerk notified that the Corporation were then assembled in Common Hall, upon which I addressed his R.H. the Prince of Wales in the following

 

Page 363

words.

May it Please Your Royal Highness; In the capacity in which I have the honor(sic) to stand before Your Royal Highness, as Recorder of this Borough, I humbly beg leave to read to Your Royal Highness, the Address of the Mayor Recorder, Justices, Bailiffs and Common Council of this Corporation; and which with Your Royal Highness permission their chief Magistrates will have the honor to present to Your Royal Highness on this highly interesting and gratifying occasion of Your Royal Highness presence in this Borough, accompanied by Your Royal Highness' illustrious Brother.

 

I then proceeded to read the following written Address which I had prepared for the occasion

 

To His Royal Highness George Augustus Frederic Prince of Wales &c. &c.

We the Mayor, Recorder, Justices Bailiffs and Common Council of the Corporation of Newcastle under Lyme, beg leave to offer our most sincere and hearty congratulations on Your Royal Highness; Arrival in the Borough.

Inviolably, and cordially attached as we have ever been to Your Royal Highness; august House, under whose auspices this Nation has attained so unexampled a height of Glory, Prosperity, and Happiness; we cannot be so unmindful of our Duty, and Obligation as not to be impressed with the most profound respect for Your

 

Page 364

Royal Highness, as well as with the warmest sense of gratitude for the distinguished favour conferred upon us in being thus indulged with an Opportunity of approaching Your Royal Highness Person, accompanied by Your Royal Highness' illustrious Brother.

As the only means in our power by which to crave these Sentiments and feelings, we humbly presume to tender to Your Royal Highnesses the Liberties and Privileges of this ancient Borough; and should Your Royal Highness graciously permit the Roll of Burgesses to be adorned and dignified with the names of Your Royal Highnesses it will not only afford an additional proof of Your Royal Highnesses Condescension, but be transmitted on Record to Posterity as our pre-eminent and fondest Honor.

 

The Mayor then presented the Address which His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales was pleased to make the following Reply which His R.H. read from a written paper.

 

Mr Mayor, Recorder, Justices, Bailiffs and Common Council of the Corporation of Newcastle under Lyme.

The distinguished manner in which I have been received in your populous borough is a proof of the affection and attachment which bear to the House of Brunswick, and on this occasion to my

 

Page 365

Person in particular; it is most truly dear to my heart to observe these sentiments pervade every part of the Country & all Ranks of the People; It cannot fail to impress upon me the most anxious wish for the continuance of Your Prosperity and I do assure you that at all times, it shall be my first object to promote it.

 

I accept with satisfaction the freedom of Your very ancient Borough, for myself and my Brother and derive great pleasure from the enrolment(sic) of Our Names amongst those of the Burgesses.

 

This paper the Prince of Wales (who when he had read it) descended from the Hustings Delivered into my own hand. His R. Highness then partook, standing, of the Collation which had been prepared & set on two Tables across the Room for the Prince &c & the other down the Room the whole length. The space on the left hand side the Table coming up from the Stairs, was packed with well dressed Company & produced altogether a striking effect. On attending the Prince down stairs he desired me to alter the paper he had given me by insisting the name of His Brother which had been omitted, & which I afterwards did by introducing the words scored under, & which His R.H. said were what he wished. He then stood a few minutes in the Hall during which I had the honour of conversing with him & which he did with great affectability & good humour particularly noticing the fineness of

 

Page 366

the Men in the Grenadier Company of Newcastle Volunteers who were drawn up in the Hall &c. &c. The Company then set off to Trentham; where at 6 o'Clock I joined them. At dinner there were two tables. At the first the Prince of Wales, Duke of Clarence, M of Stafford, Lady Horrowly (who did the honours of the Table owing to Lady Stafford & Lady Charlotte having been most unfortunately attacked with the Measles) Lord Horrowly, Lord Crewe, Lord Petersham, Lord Chief Baron, Lord Granville Leveson Gower, Lord Gower, John Talbot, Mr Macdonald, Col Leigh, Major Bloomfield, Mr R Heathcote, Archdeacon Woodhouse, Admiral Child, Dr Burt J Wedgwood & myself. The Prince of Wales as well as the Duke of Clarence behaved with the greatest affability & politeness & the former certainly appears to be an accomplished gentleman. The Duke showed great good humour & sprightliness.

On returning into the Drawing Room I had the satisfaction to have many Compliments paid me on the Address & on my speaking & reading particularly by Lord Stafford who told me that the Prince had mentioned it more than once, by Mr McDonald &c. &c. Not long after I had been in the Drawing Room the Duke of Clarence came up to me and said Mr Caldwell both my Brother & I have been extremely gratified by what we have witnessed today. We paid the closest attention and not only the Address

 

Page 367

but your speaking & reading obtained our highest approbation. My Brother has spoken of it to me more than once. On my observing that I would not be extremely sensible of so polite & flattering a mention the Duke stopped me short saying - You must not take it so. I do assure you I am not making . . .[Compliments] My Brother & I were equally struck and he has several times mentioned you since to me. I had the honour of a very long conversation with him on various subjects in the course of which he took every opportunity of saying very gratifying things to me & acquitted himself throughout with the greatest ease familiarity & good humour. He observed . . .  . . . other things that the situation I had been placed was a very trying one, & would have tried any man. I did not leave Trentham till nearly twelve oClock.

 

Saturday 13: At Newcastle this morning on various matters. The Prince was this day drawn through the Town by the Burgesses on his way to Longport.

 

Sunday 14: At home.

 

Monday 15: At Newcastle again being the Fair. As I was standing accidentally at the Roebuck Door the Prince passed on his way to Rowley when he favoured me with the most gracious notice, bowing repeatedly & turning himself round in the Carriage to look back & which he did motioning with his hand to me till the Carriage intercepted our view of each other.

 

Page 368

Tuesday 16: At Madeley attending Appeals under the Property Tax. At about a Mile on this side Newcastle Mr Jos. Adams announced to me the melancholy intelligence of the Brewery being almost reduced to Ruins by a Fire which had happened in the night. On my arrival found one part (the Stores) almost entirely destroyed but the other parts of the Building, owing to the ready and efficacious assistance afforded . . . About 2000 bushels of Corn burnt. Nothing could exceed the alacrity shown both . . . of persons to afford assistance, nor the kind interest which they seemed to take on the occasion. Proceeded to Madeley. From thence to Oakley where Sr. Jno. Chetwode strongly urged my dining & staying all night on my way to Drayton where I was engaged on the Reference of the Spl. Jury Cause Lewis & Tomlinson. Dined at Oakley. Peculiarly kind & friendly Reception. In the Evening proceeded to Drayton.

 

Wednesday 17: Engaged on Reference Mr Harvey & Mr Wedgd. on my statement to them of my own idea of the case - as I had conceived of it on the view & which I desired to do in the presence of the Solicitors on each side, all parties were so satisfied that it was thought unnecessary to examine Witnesses. Walked over the Ground & agreed finally to make the Award at the ensuing Stafford Sessions.

 

Page 369

Thursday 18: Returned from Drayton. On my way back dined at Stoney fields. Mr Hindley. Macclesfield Brewery &c.

 

Friday 19: The Mayor of Newcastle & a party consisting of Messrs Sneyd, Swinnerton, Hill, . . .[Find], Plant, Sparrow, Bagshaw, Nicksson, Philips, Adams, Smith & Fenton dined. A very pleasant day. Mr Jarvis of the Hill was so kind as to send a brace of  Carp, the most beautiful fish I ever saw.

 

Saturday 20: At Trentham again. Appeals under the property tax Sr. Jno. Chetwode, Mr Mainwaring & self. In the Evening Mr Devon a friend of Stamford arrived.

 

Sunday 21: At home. Mr Devon

 

Monday 22: Do. Alcock

 

Tuesday 23: At Trentham Appeals under Property tax act, Dined with Mr Butt.

 

Wednesday 24: At Wheelock dined with Mr & Mrs Bagley

 

Thursday 25: At Newcastle. Dr Northern

 

Friday 26: At home. Revd. Mr & Mrs Robinson Miss Wodehouse Dr Mrs Miss E & Mr J Bent dined at Linley Wood.

 

Saturday 27: At home. Engaged writing Letter to Mr Wood &c. &c.

 

Sunday 28: Do. Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood dined.

 

Monday 29: At Stone attending Navign. Meeting

 

Tuesday 30: Do. Returned in the Evening. Stopped at the Mayors

 

[1806] October, Wednesday 1: At home.

 

Page 370

Thursday 2 [No entry]

 

Friday 3: Received from Mr Mills resolutions of thanks of the Common Council of Newcastle

 

Saturday 4: [No entry]

 

Sunday 5: At Newcastle attending Mr Philips the mayor elect as Recorder at Church Morning & Evening. 

 

Monday 6: At Newcastle Mr Kinnersley Newcastle Rail Road.

 

Tuesday 7: At Stone attending Meeting of the Select Committee in consequence of Letter from Mr Sparrow of Bishton requesting my assistance on that day. Uttoxeter Canal Accts. Returned at night late.

 

Wednesday 8: At home. perusing Papers in the Cause of Lewes & Tomlinson Parker & Ball in which I had been nominated Referee & Cogney & Stirrup previous to my going to Stafford tomorrow.

 

Thursday 9: At Stafford meeting Mr Harvey & Mr Wedge in the Cause of Lewis & Tomlinson when we agreed upon our Award & gave instructions accordingly. The Cause of Parker & Ball being a Special Jury which was to have been tried at the last Assizes, being to be argued by Council before me, & the Counsel Mr Peake & Mr Puller, having fixed Saturday Morning at 11oClock, & when I also agreed to talk over with Mr Puller the Case of Cogney & Stirrup. Returned to Linley Wood late in the Evening.

 

Friday 10: At home. Engaged with Briefs papers &c. &c.

 

Saturday 11: At Stafford again. Heard the Case of Parker & Ball ingeniously argued. Examined Witness & drew up minutes of my Award. Conversation with Mr Parker on Cogney & Stirrup.

 

Sunday 12: Returned from Stafford. Stopped at Newcastle. Conversation with Mr Hammond relative to House on Newcastle Marsh which I offered to him for £1700. Found Mr Devon who had returned from Dorfold.

 

Page 371 

Monday 13: At home Mr Devon. Alcock

 

Tuesday 14 to Friday 17: [Only one entry to cover these 4 days, written between Wednesday and Thursday] At home.

 

Saturday 18: At home. Walked out with the Greyhounds & killed a Hare

 

Sunday 19: At home. Application from Sr. Thos. Broughton for vote for Genl. Broughton at the ensuing Election: but declined making any promise or Engagement

 

Monday 20: At home. Sir John & Lady Harriet & Miss Elizh. Chetwode & Mr Butt dined.

 

Tuesday 21: At the Glassworks  at Longport with our Party. Highly gratified & particularly with the new Method of ornamenting Glass in imitation of, but much superior to, Cut Glass. It is effected simply by thinly laying in the Glass with a Camel Hair pencil Glass pounded very fine & moistened with a little Sugar & water. When this is dry it is scratched or cut up into any pattern by a wooden Skewer or Tool, & admits of being done as finely as any Copper Plate. It is then put into the fire first to unite the pounded Glass with the body on which it is laid, & the operation is completed. Returned to dinner after a very pleasant Morning Excursion. Mr Jos. Wedgwood dined

 

Wednesday 22: After Breakfast Sir John &c left us, proceeding to Lord Stamfords

 

Thursday 23: At Newcastle. Engaged in the Morning with the annual Brewery Accounts. Afterwards dined at the Agricultural Society & in the Evening engaged again with the Accounts. Eliza, who had accompanied me, & I slept at Stoneyfields

 

Page 372

Friday 24: Engaged closely all day with Brewery Accounts & returned home late in the Evening

 

Saturday 25: At home being prevented going again to Newcastle as I had promised to do by the Badness of the weather, & not being very well. Engaged with Burslem, Papers Letters & Accounts.

 

Sunday 26: Do.

 

Monday 27: At home. Engaged on Burslem Papers & Accounts &c,. &c.

 

Tuesday 28: Do. Do. Do. Mr Twiss & Mr Bennett relative to Title to Estate purchased from the former. Letter to Mr Harding thereon. Letter to Mr Davenport of Capesthorne. Election for Cheshire. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 29: At Newcastle. In the afternoon Mr Cox relative to his having taken the George Inn at Knutsford. In the Eveg Mr Munday

The following description of the Process of printing Earthen Ware was delivered to me by Mr Jos. Wedgwood a short time ago for my opinion how profitable under the Acts for securing the Copyright of Engravings

"Earthen Ware printed in Blue in imitation of . . .[Manken Cheria], is a considerable Article of British Manufacture, and large Capitals are employed in it. The process by which the Earthen Ware is printed, is the following. A Copper plate is engraved with the pattern, or design, that is meant to be printed upon each piece of Earthen Ware, of a different form and size, and a set of Copper Plates for printing a dinner service will cost from £50 to £150. The upper plate is filled with Ink composed of Cobalt very finely levigated [so fine as to become a paste], Flux, and Oils similar to those used in Printers Ink. the impression is taken in the usual

 

Page 373

manner, on Tissue paper which has been brushed over on the side next the Copperplate with a size soluble in water, so as to interpose a coat of Size between the impression and the paper. The impression is laid on the piece of Earthen Ware, with the paper outermost. It is then strongly rubbed to make the ink adhere to the Earthen Ware, after which the piece of Ware is dipped in water to dissolve the coat of size, lying between the impression of the Copper Plate and the Paper, which is thus separated from the ink, and is washed off, whilst the Ink adheres to the piece of Earthen Ware.

 

Thursday 30: Engaged in the morning writing Opinion on the foregoing Case. Dined at Etruria & delivered the same to Mr Jos. Wedgwood. Mr W Sneyd of Bondwell. Returned home in the Evening.

 

Friday  31:At Newcastle early in consequence of a Letter received a few days ago from the Mayor requesting my attendance & assistance at the Election which was to take place this day. Election commenced at eleven oClock, when three candidates were proposed Edwd. W Bortle, Mr McDonald, & Joseph Meriett Esqr. but the latter declining to take the . . . Oath, an Estate which he said that he had contracted for having not been absolutely conveyed to him, & Mr Poll having demanded, the two former were returned . . . Returned home to dinner. In the Evening engaged Letter writing &c.

 

[1806] November, Saturday 1: At home

 

Sunday 2: Do. Letter from Mr Skerrett, Sent him his will & the probate copy of the late Miss C Penlingtons will by his Servant.

 

Page 374

Monday 3: At Newcastle on various matters. Returned to dinner.

 

Tuesday 4: At the Dispensary attending as Vice President. Returned to Newcastle. dined at the Roebuck settling with Mr Martin my Award in the Cause of Parker & Ball. A fatiguing day

 

Wednesday 5: [no entry]

 

Thursday 6: [no entry]

 

Friday 7: [no entry]

 

Saturday 8: At home. Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 9: Do.

 

Monday 10: At Newcastle with Mr Skerrett. Executed award in the Cause Parker & Ball & left the same at Mr Martins.

 

Tuesday 11: At home. Mr Skerrett at Burslem relative to Affairs of Wood & Caldwell. Anxious & uncomfortable on their Account

 

Wednesday 12: At Stafford attending the Election when Lord Granville Leveson Gower & Sir Edwd. Littleton were returned without opposition. Returned to dinner.

 

Thursday 13: At home. Unwell

 

Friday 14: At Swinnerton dining at Mr Tollets. Mr & Mrs Perkins, Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood. Expense of transplanting Swedish Turnips [rutabaga] about 9/ [9/-]p Acre. Mr Tollets Green crop cabbages turnips &c worth £10.10 p Acre.

 

Saturday 15: Returned from Swinnerton & called at Butterton. From home.

 

Sunday 16: At home

 

Monday 17: At Newcastle. Sent by the Market Court to Mr Robert Robinson the Title Deeds relating to Articles purchased by him from Mr Blurton & the late Mr Hatrell & received a Note acknowledging their being safely delivered. Executed Assignment of Mortgage from Mr Broade to late Mrs Bentley & delivered the same to Mr Martin.

 

Tuesday 18: At home. Engaged with Accounts &c. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 19: Do. Letters. With the Labourers in the Meadow draining, Mr Fritch

 

Page 375

Thursday 20: At home. Engaged various papers &c. Mr Scott

 

Friday 21: At Longton. Miss Gressley. Dined at Stoney fields. Engaged in Brewery Affairs & making Engagement with Mr Skidmore as Head Clerk & assistant.

 

Saturday 22: At home.

 

Sunday 23: In the night seized with a Rheumatic or Gouty Complaint attended with violent pain in the side. In bed the greatest part of the day.

 

Monday 24: Confined to my Room

 

Tuesday 25: Do. Prevented attending Newcastle Assembly as Manager

 

Wednesday 26: Do. from going to Mr Robinson of Swinnerton

 

Thursday 27: Do. But better

 

Friday 28: Went in the Carriage with Eliza to Congleton putting Answer in Chancery as Trustee under the will of Mrs [name omitted]

 

Saturday 29: At home

 

Sunday 30: Do.

 

[1806] December, Monday 1: Do.

 

Tuesday 2: Do.

 

Wednesday 3: Set off with Sr. Jno. Heathcote & Bent to Shrewsbury

 

Thursday 4: At Shrewsbury

 

Friday 5: Returned form Do.

 

Saturday 6: At home Unwell

 

Sunday 7: Do.

 

Monday 8: At Newcastle Meeting Mr . .  & Mr Tomkinson of Talk finally settling the Drat. of Award in the Cause of Jarvis & Tomlinson [these are definitely two different people despite similar names, further reference on Jan 19th] & appointed the .. . [Law Market] at Newcastle for executing the same. Mr Henry did not attend.

 

Tuesday 9: At home. Mr Johnson & Son called. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Unwell

 

Thursday 11 Do. Do.

 

Page 376

Friday 12: At Trentham attending Meeting under the new Property Tax Act. Taking Oaths as Commr. & receiving Estimates. Sirs Jno. Chetwode. Thos Fletcher, J Heathcote, Mess. Mainwaring, Steadman & self.

 

Saturday 13: At home. Drawing Agreemt. with Mr Skidmore

 

Sunday 14: Do. Mr Bent dined

 

Monday 15: At Newcastle with  Drat. of Agreement with Mr Skidmore as a Clerk & Assistant at the Brewery. Dined at Mr Bents.

 

Tuesday 16: At Sandbach dining at Mr Furnivals Mr Bent J Swinnerton & 2 Mr Wilsons.

 

Wednesday 17: At home. Mr Fritch dined

 

Thursday 18: Do. Engaged on the farm

 

Friday 19: At the Red Bull meeting Mr Wilbraham of the Grange Mr Gilbert Mr Robinson &c. relative to the injury done to Belchton Hill Pool by the cleansing of the Navigation, engaged all day. Mr Robinson returned with me to Linley Wood in the Evening, long conversation relative to Navigt. Affairs &c.

 

Saturday 20: Rode with Mr Robinson, returned by Longport & called upon Mr Henshall relative to Beechs Account due to the late Partnership of Sparrow & Caldwell which he said should be settled in February next.

 

Sunday 21: At Home having been attacked with a return of my former Complaint.

 

Monday 22: Do. Confined to the House

 

Tuesday 23: Do. Do.

 

Wednesday 24: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 25: Walked out but still very unwell

 

Friday 26: Confined to the House

 

Saturday 27: Walked out

 

Page 377

Sunday 28: Mr Bent & Mr Martin dined. Signed agreement with Mr Skidmore & discussing various matters. Jno. & Mr Bent

 

Monday 29: At home

 

Tuesday 30: Tuesday at Newcastle inspecting Arms of Newcastle Volunteers with Mr Spode from thence to Etruria inspecting the Corps from thence to Stone attending Meeting of Committee & adjourned assembly

 

Wednesday 31: Inspecting Arms with Mr Sparrow of Bishton of Stone & Sandon Volunteers, But the whole not having mustered engaged to meet Mr Sparrow again on Wednesday the 8 Jany. Returned to dinner. Conversation relative to Newcastle Election &c.

 

1807

January, Thursday 1: At home. Engaged on the Farm & various matters

 

Friday 2: Do. Do. Lawton Post Office business 

 

Saturday 3: Do.

 

Sunday 4: Do.

 

Monday 5: Do.

 

Tuesday 6: At the Dispensary attending meeting of Committee as Vice President. Mr Wedgwood  Mr Jos. Wedgwood.

 

Wednesday 7: At Stone attending Navgn. Meeting of Select Committee, Various  Business.

 

Thursday 8: Inspecting remaining part of Arms belonging to the Stone Volunteers. Returned to dinner. Miss Fletcher & Miss Bent

 

Friday 9: At Macclesfield with Mr Bent arranging Brewery Concern & making annual Statement & settlement of the Books &c. & closing the whole so that this Concern may soon be said . . .[proposals] to commence.

 

Saturday 10: Do. Do. Engaged closely both these days.

 

Sunday 11: Returned home early. In my absence Mr Davenport of Cape . . .[sthorne] called.

 

Monday 12: At home. Mr Swinnerton on various matters. Alcock

 

Page 378 

Tuesday 13: At home. Mr Munday came to dinner

 

Wednesday 14: Do.

 

Thursday 15: Do. Mr Butt Mr Bent & Blunt dined

 

Friday 16: At Newcastle with Stamford dining at Stoneyfields. Drs Bent & Northern Mr Heathcote & Blunt

 

Saturday 17: At home,. Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 18: Stamford set off on his return to Cambridge. Mr Munday left us

 

Monday 19: At Rode Heath looking over with Mr Penlington & his Son Lands at Tharlwood &c. previous to their being relet & fixing Rents. Mr Salmon who had engaged to meet me did not attend. On my Return Mr . . . [Burge] with the Award in the Cause of Jarvis ad. Tomlinson for execution, but I thought it necessary in the first place to see Mr Tomkinson & Mr Martin the Engineer & appointed to meet them at 11 oClock tomorrow at Newcastle. Mr B engaging to send the papers to them

 

Tuesday 20: At Newcastle accordingly. Mr Martin also attended. Drawing out Observations on the Award for the perusal of Mr Lodge & Mr Lowman previous to it being executed & settling plans to be endorsed in the Award &c. &c. Returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 21: I this day entered the 48th year of my age. A period which I had long fixed in my own mind for commencing to act as a Magistrate but the engaged state of my mind & thought at this time owing to the uncomfortable misunderstanding relative to the Burslem Concern & the purpose of various other matters determined me to postpone it a while longer. Called at Mr Gilberts relative to the Arbitration Mountford & Bamford & fixed Monday 2 July for a meeting at Newcastle in order to settle & make our Award; & on my Return wrote to Mr Blagg to inform him thereof.

 

Page 379

Thursday 22: At home engaged on various matters. Drew Subscription Paper for a Concert at Newcastle to be under the direction & for the benefit of Mr Alcock. In the Evening at the Assembly at Newcastle. 78 Subscribed to the Concert. Returned very late. Executed at Newcastle the Award in the Cause Jarvis & Tomlinson the same having been altered . . . to my Observations & executed by Mr Lodge.

 

Friday 23: At Trentham from early attending Meeting of Commrs. to hear Appeals under the Assessed Taxes. Sr. Tho. Chetwode Sr. John Heathcote Mr Whitworth very busy & fatiguing day being detained till 5 oClock after which returned to dinner to Linley Wood

 

Saturday 24: At home

 

Sunday 25: Do.

 

Monday 26: At Oakley to dinner Elizabeth, Eliza, Mary & self In the Evening at Drayton Assembly.

 

Tuesday 27: At Do. Drawing with Sir Tho. Chetwode Case for the Opinion of the Board as to the exemption of  Farms in Adburton &c from Property tax. Mr Kinnersley, My Norsop dined.

 

Wednesday 28: Returned from Oakley after a very pleasant visit.

 

Thursday 29: At Newcastle. Malt Duty Business &c. In the Evening Mrs Lawton relative to the Post Office Business

 

Friday 30: At home. Engaged on the Grounds &c. &c.

 

Saturday 31: At home. Do. on various matters

 

[1807] February. Sunday 1: Do.

 

Monday 2:At Newcastle attending on Reference Mountford & Bamford. Engaged all day. In the Evening at Stoneyfields where I slept

 

Tuesday 3: At Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee but Mr Sparrow prevented coming by having sprained his knee. Returned late to dinner.

 

Wednesday 4: At Mr Wedgwoods Etruria

 

Thursday 5: Do. dined at Mr Jos. Wedgwoods

 

Friday 6: Returned from Etruria

 

Saturday 7: At Newcastle Executed will. Accounts with Mr Martin &c. Mr Skerrett cane to Linley Wood.

 

Sunday 8: At home

 

Monday 9: Do. Mr Skerrett

 

Page 380

Tuesday 10: At Home attending Meeting of Select Committee, Mr Sparrow Mr Webb & self. Engaged closely all day.

 

Wednesday 11: Do. After concluding Navign. Business At Darlaston with Mr Sparrow & Mr Potter, the Engineer, inspecting plans & fixing the situation of the new Bridge, intended to be built over the River Trent. Returned home late to dinner. In the Evening Mr Fritche.

 

Thursday 12: At home. Engaged with Labourers on the Farm &c. In the Morning called on Mrs Lawton relative to the Post office Business &c. & Liability of cattle fed for the use of Family to pay Tithe & which had been claimed by the Rector.

 

Friday 13: At Newcastle to have looked into the papers relating to the Affairs of Reid in consequence of Application from Mr Byerly, but Mr Martin from home. Returned to dinner. In the Evening at Newcastle again, taking Louise with me in the Gig to see the Young Roscius in the character of Frederic in Kotzebue's most respectable Play of Lovers Vows [This was a well known play of the period and it was attempting to put it on that caused all the difficulties in Mansfield Park by Jane Austen]. Favour Opinion of this young Actor confirmed. Great defect in selecting the true emphatic word, & great want of voice. In placing the emphasis he generally lays it on the pronoun or personal verb, instead of the noun or verb in which the idea turns, Action good. General Faults. Rant & Whine.

 

Saturday 14: At home. Engaged on the Farm &c. Mr W Penlington relative to the letting of the Estates belonging to his Father & Mr Salmon the terms of doing which, that I had proposed, being approved by the parties. Draft of Agreements to be prepared by Mr Darlington.

 

Sunday 15: At home.

 

Monday 16: At Newcastle inspecting papers relative to the Affairs of Reid & afterwards writing Note to Mr Byerley with my Opinion. Brewery, various matters with Bent, John Heathcote intended Marriage. Hardmans Observations on Draft of Articles for Macclesfield Concern &c.

 

Tuesday 17: At Dispensary attending General Meeting, On return called on Mrs Wedgwood at Mr Wedgwoods. Do. Mr Jos. Wedgwood. Conversation relative to Reids Business. Returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 18: At home. Writing letter to Mr Hindley with reply to his

 

Page 381

Uncles Observations on the Macclesfield Articles. Afterwards engaged all Morning adjusting Accounts & Books.

 

Thursday 19: At home. Engaged Do. and on the Farm superintending Labourers &c. Fine mild Frost.

 

Friday 20: Do.

 

Saturday 21: Do. In the Evening Mr Atkinson

 

Sunday 22: Do. Engaged with Mr Atkinson. Long Conversation on various Matters. Consented to my nomination as one of his Executors and Trustees. Mr Bent came to dinner. Various matters with him.

 

Monday 23: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting being the first under the Training Act. Sir Jno. Chetwode Messrs Mainwaring, Spode, Whitworth, Kinnersley & self. Returned to dinner. In the Evening Dr Crompton. Mr Atkinson in the morning at Burslem.

 

Tuesday 24: Mr A & self dined at Stoneyfields. This day died my much respected neighbour Rob. Cox

 

Wednesday 25: Mr A & Dr C left Linley Wood, Engaged on Grounds Letters &c. &c. 

 

Thursday 26: At Newcastle attending Agricultural Meeting. In the Morning at the Brewery. Observations made by Mr . . .[Elanly] against the practice of sprinkling grain on the floor necessary to be answered.

 

Friday 27: Engaged on Grounds &c.

 

Saturday 28: At home. Do. Do.

 

[1807] March, Sunday 1: In the Morning Attending the Funeral of my late highly & deservedly respected Neighbour Mr Rob. Cox. Chief Pall Bearer. He died aged 59 & his Loss will be long felt by his own Family & that at Lawton Hall, the callers at whom I have every reason to believe that he has been a most active faithful Agent. Mr Bent & Mr Martin dined.

 

Page 382

Monday 2: At home. Alcock

 

Tuesday 3: At Newcastle on my way to the Dispensary, but detained at the former place by various matters of business. Mr Butt & Mr Fourchiquour to dinner. Chess.

 

Wednesday 4: At Trentham Inn attending adjourned Meeting for hearing Appeals under the Assessed taxes. Sir. Jno. Chetwode, J Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Case of George & Knighton claiming exemption under Act of Parliament. Opinion of Solr. or Attorney General to be taken through the medium of the Board of Taxes & Indemnity to be given by the Board to the Commrs. before they cd. proceed to enforce the paymt. of the Duties. Returned to dinner. Mr Butt & Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Thursday 5: At home. The Gentlemen left us in the Morning. Engaged on various matters.

 

Friday 6: At home.

 

Saturday 7: At Nantwich Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 8: Returned home to dinner late.

 

Monday 9: At home. Alcock. Arranging intended Concert &c.

 

Tuesday 10: Do. Engaged on the Grounds & various Matters. Settling Acct &c between the late Partnership of S & C & the trustees of Newcastle Marsh.

 

Wednesday 11: At Newcastle attending Meeting of the Trustees & stating & delivery Account. Returned to dinner.

 

Thursday 12: At home.

 

Friday 13: At Trentham attending Ballot under the Training Act. Sirs Jno. Chetwode Heathcote Mainwaring Steadman Kinnersley & self. long Conversation with Sr. John Chetwode relative to Mr Whitbreads Poor Bill, which he gave me to peruse before my Meeting him again at Madeley tomorrow. Returned late in the Evening. Engaged with the Bill & making various Observations on writing thereon.

 

Page 383

Saturday 14: At Madeley attending Ballot. Sirs J Chetwode & Tho. Fletcher Mr Mainwaring & self. Long Conversation again relative to the Poor Bill & gave Sir Jno my Observations in Writing.

 

Returned to Dinner.

 

Sunday 15: At home in expectation of Mr Bent & Mr Hindley at dinner but they were prevented coming.

 

Monday 16: Set off this morning at six oClock to attend Meeting of Select Committee at Wolesley Bridge. Heavy Snow. At Wolesley Bridge engaged all day.

 

Tuesday 17: Engaged Do. till 2 oClock. Returned home in the Evening. Heavy Snow & severe cold.

 

Wednesday 18: At home.

 

Thursday 19: At Trentham again attending for the Ballot. Messrs Spode Steadman & self. Returned to dinner

 

Friday 20: At home. Sir Thos. Mr & two Miss Fletchers with Mr & Mrs Bayley & Miss Knight dined at Linley Wood.

 

Saturday 21: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Sunday 22: Do. Mr Bent & Mr Hindley dined. Macclesfield Concerns

 

Monday 23: Do. Mr Alcock. Farm &c.

 

Tuesday 24: At Newcastle for the purpose of making Arrangements relative to the sale of the House on the Marsh. Afterwards dined at Mr Plants. Returned in the Evening

 

Wednesday 25: At home. Engaged on various matters previous to going tomorrow to the Assizes. Summoned on the Grand and two special Juries.

 

Thursday 26: At Stafford. Mr Henry & Mr Lodge on the reference of Jarvis & Tomlinson. Grand Jury. Heavy Calendar & close attendance. Dined with the Judges. . .[Mission] & Lawrence.

 

Friday 27: Do. In the morning at Church. Afterwards close attendance on the Grand Jury. Dined late with the Sherriff Lane.

 

 

 

May need include File A docs. 60 - 79 + 81

 

 

 

 

Page 384

Saturday 28: At Stafford. Special Jury Snow v Snow, Sir Tho. Fletcher. In Court from 8 in the Morning till half past ten at night. The trial of this Cause, which was respecting the validity of a will lasting upwards of thirteen hours,

 

Sunday 29: Having been prevented from attending the Sale of the Houses which was fixed for yesterday & finding they were not sold. Accepted the Offers made by Mr . . .[Robt.] Crewe & Mr Martin. the Upper House 950. Lower 750. being the prices I had originally fixed. Dined at Mr Bents.

 

Monday 30: At home. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 31: At Stone attending Navign. Committee Meeting.

 

April, [1807] Wednesday 1: Do. General Assembly when I was unanimously & with many flattering expressions of Confidence from the . . . present chosen one of the Select Committee consisting of 3 persons to conduct & manage this great & important Concern. Returned in the Evening.

 

Thursday 2: Mr Butt & Mr Robt. Griffin Junr. dined & with whom engaged. In the Evening read aloud part of the Lay of the . . .  . . .[Court Martil]

 

Friday 3: In the Morning with Mr Thos Sparrow  attending Mr Wittenhall the Magistrate relative to sundry prosecutions for pilferages committed on the Canal. Afterwards engaged with Mr Butt & with Mr Griffin who staid over today. In the Evening read at their particular request some lines in Shakespeare.

 

Saturday 4: At Newcastle on various Matters. Returned to dinner. In the Evening Mr Cox advising relative to the Affairs of his late Father.

 

Sunday 5: At home.

 

Monday 6: Do. Engaged previous to setting off tomorrow for Shrewsbury. In the Evening Miss . . .[Noble] & Miss J. . . .[Noble] & Miss Stamford.

 

Tuesday 7: Left home early. Proceeded from Newcastle with Sr. Jno. Heathcote & Mr Bent to Shrewsbury.

 

Page 385

Wednesday 8: Engaged closely all day in the Counting House arranging & settling Books Account &c. & State of the Concern which had every appearance of Success.

 

Thursday 9: Do. Do. all morning. After dinner to Tunhill where we slept.

 

Friday 10: Set down at Drayton. From thence to Chopperhill Mill with Mr . . .[Warner] meeting Mr Harvey & Mr Wedge in order to have concluded this business which occupied all the day but could not finally be arranged. Returned late at night.

 

Saturday 11: At home. Fatigued & unwell

 

Sunday 12: Do. Mr Bent dined

 

Monday 13: Do. Miss . . .[Nobles] left Linley. Alcock. Writing long Letter to Mr Warren on the business of Jarvis & Tomlinson Drawing Plan &c. In the Morning at Talk on the Hill in consequence of a Complaint from an Irish Traveller of his having been assaulted by a man from . . .[hoxs] Barlows. Found out the Offender; a Boatman - made him apologize(sic) for his Conduct & pay 2/6 to the Traveller.

 

Tuesday 14: At Mrs Coxs in consequence of a Message received from her yesterday. perusing will of her late Husband with various Accounts papers &c & advising her on his affairs & particularly respecting the dispute with Mrs Lanten &c.

 

Wednesday 15: At Trentham attending Lieutenancy Meeting. Appeals under the Training Act. Dined Sr. J. H.. W. Spode & self. Mr Mainwaring but did not stay

 

Thursday 16: At Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee. Mr Sparrow & self. Returned late.

 

Friday 17: At home Unwell

 

Saturday 18: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 19: Do.

 

Monday 20: Do. Writing long Letter in reply to one from Mr Harvey in the business of Jarvis & Tomlinson. Perusing papers &c.

 

Tuesday 21: At Newcastle on various Matters. Concert &c. &c. Miss Crewes of Merson came to dinner. 

 

Wednesday 22: Engaged on the farm. In the Evening attending the Concert in Newcastle

 

Page 386

Played the flute. Good attendance. The Horses and Carriage used for the first time.

 

Thursday 23: At home. Farm &c. Bought 12 sheep & 6 lambs & turned them into the Meadow at the farm. Cost 13.13. the weather which had been severely cold for some time past began to soften.

 

Friday 24: Do.

 

Saturday 25: At home. In the Evening Mr Robinson the Rector of Stoke relative to the Bill in Parliament for dividing into several Rectories &c. & advising

 

Sunday 26: At home.

 

Monday 27: At Newcastle to have met Mr Robinson pursuant to appointmt. made on Saturday Evening but received a Letter informing me that he could not come being obliged to attend the Bishop. Engaged on various other matters.

 

Tuesday 28: In the Morning Mr Twiss & Mr Penlington relative to letting to the former the Dwellinghouse &c. on Rode Heath. Drawing out proposals for lease & writing Long Letter to Sir Thos. Broughton therewith, Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 29: At home. Letter from Mr Thos Sparrow inclosing(sic) one from his

Brother relative to Mr MacDonald proposing himself as a Candidate at the ensuing Elections requesting my opinion thereon by which he said Mr M wd. be governed. In the afternoon at Newcastle on this business & detained till late.

 

Thursday 30: Writing long Letter to Mr Sparrow. Mr Twiss with request that I shd meet Sr. Thos. Broughton at Rode tomorrow for the purpose of finally settling about the House &c. Note from Mr Bent saying that Mr M had come down & was proceeding on his Canvass with Mr Brother[this is what is written, he presumably means 'his brother']. Writing Letter to Mr Sparrow in lieu of former one, now rendered useless.

 

May, [1807] Friday 1: At Rode Heath meeting Sr. Thos. Broughton Mr Twiss & Mr Sherwin & finally settling about the House &c. which was at length done to the satisfaction of all parties. Engaged all morning, On my return found

 

Page 387

a Letter from Mr Booth to which sent a Reply by the servant.

 

Saturday 2: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

Sunday 3: Do.

 

Monday 4: At Newcastle previous to the Election arranging various matters with the Candidates & their Agents & Solicitors with a view to prevent useless & irritating Discussions in the Hall which I had the satisfaction to do. Requested by them to come to Newcastle again tomorrow.

 

Tuesday 5: At Newcastle Engaged on the same business.

 

Wednesday 6: At Newcastle early attending on the Election. At a quarter before nine commenced Candidates Mr Booth, Macdonald, Fletcher & Merriott. Mr Pooley Counsel for the latter. On his using some intemperate & inflammatory language I interrupted him & asserted the . . . & as well as I was at the dignity of the Court, which drew from him an ample Apology & explanation, & a promise that nothing of the kind should occur again. To this Circumstance trifling as it may appear was in a great measure owing the peace & good Order of the Election. Drawn contest & a most fatiguing & arduous task to me. Slept at Stoney fields

 

Thursday 7: Do. Do.

 

Friday 8: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Do. On this day ended one of the Closest & hard fought Contests that Election History presents. I had the satisfaction to have my Conduct approved by all Parties.  Each Candidate expressing himself in strong terms: & I had the still greater satisfaction to reflect that it was in some degree owing to my exertions that such a Contest as this was got through without a single Act of Violence the slightest or injury having been done to any one person. Returned late to Linley Wood,

 

Sunday 10: At home. But extremely exhausted & fatigued.

 

Page 388

Monday 11: Do. Do. Engaged in referring Notes & proceedings at the Election with a view to reducing  them into a form so as to be useful on future Occasions.

 

Tuesday 12: Do. Do.

 

Wednesday 13: Do. Engaged on the grounds & with various matters that had occurred during my absence. In the Evening Note from Mrs Lawton expressing a wish to see me on Business.

 

Thursday 14: Perusing papers relating to the Affairs of the late Mr Rob. Cox to which I concluded Mrs Lawton's application to have relation but the extreme inclemency of the weather added to my still being very unwell prevented my going to Lawton Hall. In the Evening Letter from Sr. Jno. Chetwode, accompanying resolution of the Board of Commrs. of Taxes on the Application made to them for the Opinion of the Atty & Solr. Genl. on the Knighton Case & requesting my sentiments of the Conduct of the Board.

 

Friday 15: At Lawton attending Mrs Lawton relative to the Affairs of the late Mr Rob. Cox & explaining various matters to her when I proposed to show to Mr Chas. Lawton the papers in my possession in case he would come to Linley Wood tomorrow morning.

 

Saturday 16: At home. Engaged with Mr Chas. Lawton on the affairs of Mr Cox. Afterwards writing long letter to Sir Jno Chetwode relative to the affair with the Board of taxes.

 

Sunday 17: At home. Mr W Bent dined. Afterwards Mr Tollet & Mr Hill (who I had expected to dinner) advising with me in relation to the right of getting the Coals in the Land belonging to Talk Chapel & other matters, Mr Tollet all night.

 

Monday 18: Accompanied Mr Tollet to . . .[Fenton], looking over his farms Stock &c. in which I found great improvements made. All Morning. Returned to dinner & engaged in the Evening.

[written very small at the foot of the next two pages] As we were returning home Mr Tollet told me that the late Mr Foster Bowler a few days before his death told him that in considering most carefully the Cases of Hardy &c who were tried for High Treason in [gap left] He thought them all guilty Mr Bower was always warmly attached to the Fox party but having a Silk form he could not refuse a Brief on these . . . Having taken a Brief said that he thought it his duty most attentively to investigate & Consider the Case. Mr T said that tho the Judge Baron Esqr. who tried them took his lead in consequence of his duty . . .[Man  ors] Conduct on that occasion. Mister Bower was one of the most honourable Men as well as . . .  . . . [This refers to the arrest and trial of the author Thomas Hardy and others for Treason. The trial took place in 1794 and lasted 9 days, a considerably long time for trials in this period. Hardy was exonerated by three separate juries to much public rejoicing!]

 

Page 389

with Mr Tollet who again staid all night.

 

Tuesday 19: Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood came to Breakfast after which Mr Tollet & Mr W went to Fenton. Engaged at home on various matters

 

Wednesday 20: At Newcastle on various matters. Returned to dinner. In the Evening Letter again from Sr. Jno Chetwode in consequence of his Long chat & Conversation with Sr. Thos Plummer on the behaviour of the Board of taxes & writing reply with an authority to use my name in a Remonstrance either to the Duke of Portland as first Lord of the Treasury or to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Inspecting & arranging papers previous to my going to Nantwich tomorrow to see Mr Skerrett previous to his meeting Mr Wood on the Burden  of Affairs the latter having failed to go to Nantwich on Friday. Conversation with Mr Fletcher relative to Newcastle Election. In my absence St Thos & Lady F had called at Linley Wood.

 

Thursday 21: At Nantwich. Engaged with Mr Skerrett.

 

Friday 22: From Nantwich to Betley. Long conversation with Sr. Thos & Lady Fletcher relative to the Election. Delivered in the most explicit terms my perfect conviction of the integrity & impartiality of the Returning Officers on the occasion of the late Election & to which whether called upon in a Court of Justice before a Committee of the House of Commons, or through the . . . of a Public Newspaper I should feel it to be my duty to bear the strongest & most unequivocal testimony. Sr. Thos. F afterwards produced the Morning Post & showed me a paragraph relating to the Election; which I immediately declared to be equally unfair, uncandid & improper but it came from what quarter it would. It certainly was so & cannot be too . . . refuted & condemned. This Declaration of my Sentiments of the Conduct of the returning Officers I thought it right to make in justice to them, & that as their Advisor if my name attached, I desired to take my full share of Responsibility - from which I never would shirk. The strongest expressions were

 

Page 390

used by both of the . . . & they entertained of the humble Conduct pursued by myself throughout.

 

Saturday 23: At home.

 

Sunday 24: Early Mr Skerrett in consequence of  his Interviews with Mr Wood. Probability of amicable arrangement; but Mr W Conduct by no means candid & satisfactory to me. Messrs. W & Richd. Bent & Mr Sneyd of Bradwall dined. In the morning told Mr Skerrett at his going away that I wished to have Mr Woods proposals in writing.

 

Monday 25: Letter to Sr. Jno Heathcote & Mr Mainwaring relative to the Board of Taxes. Engaged at the Farm. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 26: At home. Various matters. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 27: At home. Engaged on the farm &c.

 

Thursday 28: At Newcastle on various matters, Brewery &c. Returned to dinner

 

Friday 29: At home. Unwell. Mr W Penlington relative to receiving the Rents &c.

 

Saturday 30: Do. This morning had the misfortune to lose a very valuable black cart Mare, in foal by Mr Stuyles Horse Tom Shuffleton,. A good Racer. Occasioned by being cast in a swamp in . . .[Serahow] Moor

 

Sunday 31: At home.

 

June, [1807] Monday 1: At home. Farm &c.

 

Tuesday 2: At Newcastle relative to a Letter to be inserted in the Morning Post, Stafford & other papers on the part of the Returning Officers at the late Election in consequence of the Paragraph that had appeared reflecting on their Conduct. Drawing up such letter &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 3: At Brewery Wood meeting Mr Tollett & viewing his improvements on that farm. Mr Tollett with Mr & Mrs Jos. Wedgwood dined. the former staid all night.

 

Thursday 4: At Newcastle again. From thence to Butterton calling upon Mr Swinnerton. Gullimores reference &c.

 

Friday 5: Engaged in the morning on the Burslem Affairs & writing long letter to Mr Skerrett in consequence of a very dissatisfactory one which I had received from Mr Wood. Afterwards receiving Mr Penlingtons Rents who with Mr W P dined.

 

Page 391

Saturday 6: At home. Engaged at the Dark on various matters all Morning.

 

Sunday 7: At Nantwich consulting with Mr Skerrett again relative to the Burslem Affairs. Dined & returned in the Evening and found Dr. & Mrs Crompton & Henry at Linley Wood.

 

Monday 8: At home. Engaged with Dr. Crompton. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 9: Do. The Dr & Henry lefty Linley Wood.

 

Wednesday 10: Do. Mrs Crompton & Mary Do. Afterwards at Newcastle but Mr Bent gone to Shrewsbury. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Thursday 11: At home. Engaged on various matters preparatory to going to Stone tomorrow to attend Select Committee Meeting.

 

Friday 12: At Stone. Mr Sparrow Webb & self. Closely engaged in business.

 

Saturday 13: Do. Mr Webb went early in the Morning. Returned home late to dinner.

 

Sunday 14: At home. Mr Bent called on his Road to Sandbach. Shrewsbury & Macclesfield Affairs.

 

Monday 15: At Swinnerton attending Mr Tolletts Sheep shearing. Messrs Cotes of Meadcot, Clifford of Tixall, Lester, Grone, Crocket, . . .[Swinfor] &c. &c. Promising appearance of the compleat(sic) Success of this Speculation. Returned in the Evening with Mr R Bent who had accompanied me in the gig in the Morning.

 

Tuesday 16: At home. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 17: At Betley with Elizabeth. Calling upon Mr & Mrs Sneyd, On our Return found Ann with Mrs & Miss Turner. In the evening at Alsager relative to Assessment of Estates in that Township to the property tax. Cut the Grass on the Slope.

 

Thursday 18: In the morning with Messrs. Philips, Ford & Clowes at Breakfast relative to the Reply which it might be proper to make to Mr Fletchers Letter in the last Staffordshire Advertiser. Drawing such Reply for them. Mr Blunt & Mr Jos. Wedgwood at dinner. In the Evening at Newcastle finally correcting the Reply for the Press. In the Evening Miss Harwood with Betsy & the three Jarretts arrived.

 

Page 392

Friday 19: At home. Engaged on various matters. Farm &c.

 

Saturday 20: Do

 

Sunday 21: Do.

 

Monday 22: At . . .[Asthury] in the morning. Calling at Mr Heptonstalls to have seen Mr Atherson but he was gone home.

 

Tuesday 23: [no entry]

 

Wednesday 24: [no entry]

 

Thursday 25: Began mowing in the Meadow

 

Friday 26: [no entry]

 

Saturday 27: At home. Mr Skerrett

 

Sunday 28: Do. Mr Skerrett Mr Bent & J Barron dined

 

Monday 29: At Newcastle on various matters. Returned to dinner

 

Tuesday 30: At Stone attending Genl. Committee Meeting. Returned at night & found Henry Holland.

 

July, [1807] Wednesday 1: At home. Engaged with H.H.

 

Thursday 2: Do. H. H. left us early in the morning.

 

Friday 3: Began mowing the remainder of the Meadow

 

Saturday 4: Engaged in the Hay

 

Sunday 5: At home

 

Monday 6: Do.

 

Tuesday 7: At home. In the afternoon engaged with Tenants

 

Wednesday 8: Do. Engaged in the Hay

 

Thursday 9: At home. Nr & Mrs Sneyd & Mr & Mrs J. Wedgwood dined.

 

Friday 10: At Trentham. Assessed taxes. Sir. Jno. Chetwode J Heathcote & self.

 

Saturday 11: At home. Busy in the Hay.

 

Sunday 12: At home

 

Monday 13: At Newcastle on various maters pf Business all morning Retd. to dinner & found Mr & Mrs Turner who left us in the Evening. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 14: At home. Mr Smith Jnr. of Congleton on Mrs Watkiss Affairs.

 

Page 393

Wednesday 15: At home. Engaged Hay &c.

 

Thursday 16: Do. Mr Bent

 

Friday 17: Do. Mr Colalough of Sandbach & Mr James Cox advising relative to various matters in the Affairs of the late Mr Cox great part of the morning.

 

Saturday 18: At Congleton putting in first Answer in Chancery in the Affairs of Mrs Steadman & Miss Watkiss &c.

 

Sunday 19: At home. Mr Jos. Wedgwood & Mr W Bent dined advising with me relative to matters in dispute between Messrs Jno & Wm Turners Creditors & Mr Glover & which had been referred to them. Mr Hindley dined. In the Evening the Bents left us.

 

Monday 20: At home. Engaged on various matters. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 21: Do. Finished Hay Harvest. Writing letter to Mr Booth in reply to one yesterday received from him relative to the second petition against the Return for Newcastle &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 22: At home. Engaged on various matters, Accounts &c.

 

[no date given, clearly intended to be a new day but no day missing] Do. In the House unwell.

 

Thursday 23: Do. Engaged all morning arranging Papers Letters &c. In the Afternoon Mr Morris relative to an Application to be made to the Postmaster Genl. for  North Bag from Lawton & signing the same. Mr R Skerrett

 

Friday 24: At home Engaged with papers &c. &c.

 

Saturday 25: Do. Do.

 

Sunday 26: Do.

 

Monday 27: Do. Alcock with whom engaged repairing Piano Forte

 

Tuesday 28: At Etruria dining with Mr Jos. Wedgwood

 

Wednesday 29: At home

 

Thursday 30: At Betley attending Funeral of the late Mrs Tollet of whose will I had been appointed Executor. . . .[dined] with Red. W Hill & Mr Hinchcliffe. Bearers Sir Thos Broughton. Messrs Hill, Hinchcliffe Ellis Wickstead Clarke Mr Sneyd of Betley & self

 

Friday 31: At Betley again meeting the other Executors & Mr Tollet perusing the will & making sundry Arrangements relative to the Affairs detained all day which prevented my going forward to Stafford Assizes as I had intended.

 

Page 394 

August [1807] Saturday 1: At home

 

Sunday 2: Do.

 

Monday 3: Do. Engaged with various papers &c.

 

Tuesday 4: Do. Mr Fourchiquour. Received intelligence of the accident which had happened to Mr R Wilson of Hanley who with his Child in his Arms was blown to pieces by a Cannon accidentally or incautiously discharged by his Brother.

 

Wednesday 5: t Newcastle Races dined at the Ordinary. In the Evening at the Ball after which returned home with Elizabeth.

 

Thursday 6: At Do. Do. In the Evening at the play after which returned home.

 

Friday 7: Do. Do. Do.

 

Saturday 8: At Newcastle. dining at the Roebuck being the Celebration of Earl Gowers coming of age. Mr Macdonald &c. &c. Slept at Stoneyfields.

 

Sunday 9: Returned home in the Morning accompanied by Mr Bent with whom long Conversation relative to the establishment of a Brewery at Liverpool by Dr. Crompton & Mr R Bent, when I finally determined to go to Eton & confer with Dr C on the subject.

 

Monday 10: At home.

 

Tuesday 11: At Trentham hearing Appeals under the Land & property tax Mr Mainwaring & self. Mr . . .[Chetwode] with who(sic) only staid about half an hour. Great number of people & very busy & fatiguing day. Dined afterwards at Mr Butts with Mr Mainwaring & Mr Blunt Afterwards to Stone to attend  Select Committee which had been adjourned till tomorrow in consequence of my Engagement today at Trentham

 

Wednesday 12: Engaged all day at Stone. Mr Sparrow Mr Webb & self.

 

Thursday 13: Engaged again at all the morning. Returned to dinner. Alcock. Mr Blunt who came to consult me on a purchase . . .[already] made by him & various arrangements of his affairs &c. Miss Furnival

 

Page 395

Friday 14: At home. Engaged on various papers & matters

 

Saturday 15: Do. Considering & arranging Plan for intended Brewery at Liverpool

 

Sunday 16: Do. Mr Bent at dinner further occupation relative to L. Brewery & the proposals to be made to Dr Crompton.

 

Monday 17: At home. Engaged pervious to setting off for Liverpool [crossed out and replaced by] Eton tomorrow

 

Tuesday 18: Set off on Journey Elizabeth & self in the Gig attended by Peter on horseback. Got to Ollerton to dinner after a very pleasant Ride.

 

Wednesday 19: At Ollerton dined at Mr Hollands at Knutsford

 

Thursday 20: Proceeded from Ollerton to Eton where we arrived to dinner.

 

Friday 21: Communicated Plan of intended Brewery to Dr C which meeting with his Approbation agreed to write to Mr B to come down to Eton.

 

Saturday 22: Writing Letter to Mr B. Afterwards looking over the Dr[s] Grounds at the Park & Wavertree to see if they offered any proper situation

 

Sunday 23: At . . .[Gatnere]. In the afternoon went to Mr Roscoe's with whom spent several hours agreeably.

 

Monday 24: At Liverpool. In the Evening Mr Bent & R Bent arrived at Eton

 

Tuesday 25: At the Park & Wavertree & from thence to Liverpool making enquiries after situation &c.

 

Wednesday 26: At Liverpool again. Do. from thence Mr & R Bent set off on their Return. The situation at Wavertree appearing to be on the whole the most eligible.

 

Thursday 27: Left Eton on our journey to Manchester; which we resolved to take in on our way back on order to see Mrs Siddons & from some expectation of seeing the Girls there, which we did. Our party consisting of Miss Stamford, Eliza, Mary, Ann, Stamford, Miss Bent & Dr Thos Bent. Saw Mrs Siddons in Belvidera, her performance of which afforded me the greatest delight though from age & increased bulk many of the Graces of person & Action which I formerly so well remembered also highly admired, were necessarily impaired. [Sarah Siddons, actress, 1755  - 1831 considered to be the best tragedienne of the 18th century. Born at Brecon, retired formally 1812 but last actual appearance 1819, died London. Belvedera was her first major success, 1774.]The new theatre which had been opened but a few months elegant & commodious. [This is the Theatre Royal in Fountain Street which officially opened on 29 July 1807]

 

Friday 28: Returned home. Dined at Congleton. Heard of the Derangement of Mr Johnsons Affairs

 

Saturday 29: Very busy & fatiguing day, not getting back to dinner till 6 oClock

 

Sunday 30: At home.

 

Page 396 

Monday 31: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

September, [1807]Tuesday 1: At Trentham Elizth & Self calling upon Lord & Lady Stafford; but they were gone out. Mr Fourchiquour.

 

Wednesday 2: At home. Unwell

 

Thursday 3: Do. Do & prevented dining at Mr Spodes.

 

Friday 4: At Newcastle. Various matters relative to the Shrewsbury & the intended Liverpool Brewery. Conversation with Dr Bent relative to the Letter. Returned to dinner.

 

Saturday 5: At home. Drawing case for the Opinion of Mr Peake relative to the right of Landowner to sink wells in his Land if prejudicial to wells in the Neighbourhood & Letter to him. Mrs Lawrences Daughters [may be Mrs Lawrence & her Daughters]

 

Sunday 6: At home. Mr Bent. Alteration the Salopian Brewery Articles to empower Partners to divise(sic) Share to Sons &c. When I promised to sketch out the necessary Memorandum & come to Newcastle tomorrow to meet Sir Jno Heathcote. Also settling Agment. for well sinking . . .

 

Monday 7: The Lawrences left Linley. Afterwards at Newcastle meeting Sir Jno Heathcote & finally settling Alterations to be made in the Articles &c. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 8: At Newcastle on Reference of matters in dispute between Mr Swinnerton of Butterton & Rd. Gullimore late Tenant of the Delphouse Estate. Messrs Swinnerton, Brandon, Plant, Tilsley, & various witnesses. Finally settled the same to the satisfaction of all Parties. Afterwards at Mr Sparrows relative to the Agreement between the Navgn. Co. & Messrs Sparrow & Hales for Caskhead Mine Waters which I brought with . . . to promise & consider.

 

Wednesday 9: At Basford dining at Dr Bents.

 

Thursday 10: At Trentham. Appeals under Property tax. Sr. Jno Chetwode Mr Mainwaring & self Mr M went early. Great number of People & fatiguing day. Returned very late to dinner

 

Friday 11: At home. Mrs Cox advising relative to her Affairs. A gentleman at Worcestershire relative to a Reference of matters in dispute between Mr Gardiner Mr Meakin & others which I appointed for the £5

 

Page 397 

Saturday 12: At home. Various matters. Henry Holland

 

Sunday 13: Do. Bent dined

 

Monday 14: [entry crossed out]

 

Tuesday 15: At Madeley Appeals under Property tax Sir Jno Chetwode Sir Tho. Fletcher Mr Mainwaring & self. Afterwards dined at Betley Court with the Oakley family. Eliz. Eliza Miss S Stamford & self. A very pleasant day.

 

Wednesday 16: At Darlaston Hall to dinner & all night

 

Thursday 17: At Trentham Appeals under Property tax & Genl. Licensing day. Sirs Jno Chetwode Tho Broughton Tho Fletcher Mr Fletcher Mr Smith Mr Mainwaring & self. All dined except Sir Tho Broughton after a long & fatiguing day.

 

Friday 18: The Mayor of Newcastle dined with Messrs Sneyd, Northern, Sparrow, G Wood, Clowes, Miller, T Fenton, Smith, Ford, Bagshaw, Swinnerton.

 

Saturday 19: At home. various matters

 

Sunday 20: At home.

 

Monday 21: At Doddlespool dining at Mr Broughtons. Elizath. Miss S & self

 

Tuesday 22: At Stone attending on Select Committee Mr Sparrow Webb & self.

 

Wednesday 23: Do. Do. Returned late to dinner

 

Thursday 24: At Lord Crewe's meeting Mr Harding Mr Meynells Agent relative to Audley Manor &c.

 

Friday 25: At the Red Bull Lawton attending on Reference Meakin v Bennett in the Kings Bench referred to me by Rule of Court when after examintn. of Witnesses &c. I determined in favour of the Defendt. but recommended him to purchase the annual Rent payable to the Plt. & which being complied with a satisfactory end was put to the Business.

 

Saturday 26: At Newcastle on various matters & particularly to call on Mr Chetwynd who was there with his . . . on perm't. Duty

 

Sunday 27: At home.

 

Page 398

Monday 28: At Stone attending Genl. Committee Meeting

 

Tuesday 29: Do. General Assembly. Vote of thanks to the Select Committee. Returned at night.

 

Wednesday 30: At home. Farm & various matters

 

October, [1807] Thursday 1: At Trentham attending Militia Meeting for receiving & settling Lists. Also Appeals under property tax. Sr. Jno Chetwode Heathcote Mr Heathcote Mainwaring Smith Adml. Child Spode & self. This morning Stamford left us on his Return to Cambridge.

 

Friday 2: At home, Mr Chetwynd dined with Mr Hart his Lieut. Sparrow, Northern R Bent T Bent old Mr Hindley T Mr Bent. Pleasant day.

 

Saturday 3: At home. Engaged on the farm &c.

 

Sunday 4: At home. In the afternoon Mr Potts

 

Monday 5: Do. Engaged on the Farm & various matters. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 6: At Newcastle. Dining with the late Mayor on the expiration of his Mayoralty.

 

Wednesday 7: At home. Engaged with various papers &c.

 

Thursday 8: Do. Mr Harding relative to the Lease of Land to Poor of . . .[Bortherly]

 

Friday 9: Mr Eardley relative to dispute with Mr Combes respecting purchase of the Cross Heaths. Afterwards at Newcastle on various matters. Duty on late Miss Stamford's Effects, Brewery Concerns &c.

 

Saturday 10: At home.

 

Sunday 11: Newcastle early attending the Mayor & Corporation to Church dined at the Mayors. 

 

Monday 12: At home, Engaged on farm & various matters

 

Tuesday 13: Do. Gardener from Etruria looking over the new Green house. Said one black Hamburgh & one white . . .[Frontorial] Grape would do very well. Border about 4 feet wide: but good soil about 12 feet under the roots shooting with Branches. Compost of good fresh soil, old Dung, vegetable Mould & lime about 2 bushels or 3 feet deep.

 

Wednesday 14: At Trentham Inn attending Militia Meeting. Afterwards dining at Mr Nickssons Newcastle. Mr Edwards Lord . . .[Astridges] Welsh Harper with whose performance much pleased. Slept

 

Page 399

at Stoney fields

 

Thursday 15: Engaged at the Brewery all day on Settlement of annual Acct

 

Friday 16: Do. Do. all morning. Dined at the Roebuck being the Agl. Meeting

 

Saturday 17: Finally closing the annual Acct. Returned with Elizth. to Linley Wood to dinner she having joined me at Stoney fields on Thursday morning.

 

Sunday 18: At home.

 

Monday 19: Do. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 20: Do. Lord & Lady Stafford called. Friendly & obliging behaviour. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 21: Do. Engaged on the Grounds &c. In the Evening had an opportunity of very distinctly viewing the Comet both with the Naked Eye & with the Glass, & which we did for a considerable time from 7 to about ½ past seven oClock. Situation a little to the North of the West. [Referred to as the 'Great comet of 1807' and well documented, visible throughout the autumn and winter of 1807] Mr Munday

 

Thursday 22: At Newcastle dining with Dr Northern. Mr Cotton &c.

 

Friday 23:Engaged all morning drawing Case relative to the power of sinking a well for the use of a Steam Engine at Wavetree if prejudicial to wells already sunk in the neighbourhood. Mr & Mrs Martin & children at dinner.

 

Saturday 24: Engaged again on Do. & Copying & writing Letter therewith to Dr Crompton

 

Sunday 25: At home.

 

Monday 26: At Newcastle attending Lieutenancy Meeting to fix Ballot for Militia Total 1155. Audley Parish 111 Effectives 6 to be drawn being as near as may be to the established Ratio on this occasion of 1 in 18 Mr Spode Kinnersley & self.

 

Tuesday 27: At home. Mr Fourchiquour. Engaged on Burslem papers preparatory to my seeing Mr Wood who had fixed tomorrow for coming here.

 

Wednesday 28: At home. Engaged with Mr Wood all day. When the . . . & misunderstandings which had for some time past interrupted the harmony of our connection explained & done away.

 

Page 400

Thursday 29: Returned with Mr Wood this morning inspecting the new Engine Buildings &c. Returned to Newcastle various Brewery matters &c. Mr & Mrs Potts came to dinner.

 

Friday 30: At home. Engaged with the Potts & also engaged in compleating Deed of Agreement between the Proprs. of the Navig. & Mr Sparrow of Bishton & Mr Hales for the water tax of the Engine at Cockshead.

 

Saturday 31: Engaged with Mr Potts. Fine walk to Alsager

 

November, [1807] Sunday 1: Mr & Mrs Potts left Linley

 

Monday 2: Engaged in the morning drawing Deposition to be made by me relative to Tho. Austens shooting in Swallow Moor wood an Information having been laid against him by Mr Lawtons Game Keeper & afterwards attending at Mr Wittenhalls when information dropped being laid in . . . name. Afterwards engaged chiefly in revising & finally correcting the Agreement between the Co of Props. & Messrs Sparrow & Hales. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 3: At Stone attending Select Committee. Mr Sparrow & self. Long sitting.

 

Wednesday 4: Do. I this morning read over the Agreement which I had prepared & Mr Sparrow who professed himself to be so fully satisfied with the manner in which I had arranged the various matters that he declined taking it along with him for any further consideration; & thus I had the satisfaction of bringing to an end a matter that has for a long time past disturbed the harmony of the Parties & occasioned much trouble & vexation. Retd. very late to dinner & found Mr Butt with whom engaged during the Evening, Mr Fritche.

 

Thursday 5: At home. Engaged on various matters Mt Butt having left us this morning. Writing long letter to Mr Jones of Leek relative to the Lawtons &c.

 

Friday 6: Mrs & two Miss Woods came to Linley. In the Evening Dr Crompton

 

Saturday 7: Engaged with Dr Crompton. Liverpool Brewery &c. Recd.

 

Page 401

very flattering Invitation from Ld. & Lady Stafford to Elizath. & self & our Guests to dine at Trentham on Thursday next; in consequence of which determined that Eliza shd at all events return out of Lancaster & Ann wrote accordingly. On such occasions as those connected with the genl. level fare & happiness of my Children hope that I shall ever continue as regardless of expense as I trust that I have ever been. Mr Wood came to dinner.

 

Sunday 8: Service as usual. Very pleasant & harmonious day with Mr Wood & the Doctor but the latter left us in the Evening in consequence of an Engagement to dine with Mr Roscoe & a party of his friends & which prevented our going as he had fully intended to Stoney fields.

 

Monday 9: Rode with Mr Wood this morning to Burslem. From thence to Newcastle on various matters. Alteration in Salopian Brewery Articles &c. Mr Wood came again to dinner.

 

Tuesday 10: At home. The heaviest & most important fall of snow that I ever remember this season of the year which confined me entirely to the House but a great deal of amusing & satisfactory Conversation & much information on the Subject of our Colliery, Flint grinding, Steam engines &c.

 

Wednesday 11: Mr Mrs & Miss Wood left us after a visit which I hope has healed forever those little misunderstandings which for some time past have occasioned both Mr Wood & myself much . . .[enmity] & pain. Misunderstandings I purposely call them: for to Misunderstanding only I am persuaded the whole was attributable. Eliza arrived in the Afternoon from Mr Atkinsons.

 

Thursday 12: Dining at Lord Staffords. Elizabeth Eliza & self. An extremely pleasant visit and in the Evening entertained & highly gratified by hearing Madam Catalani who was on a visit to Trentham sing which she did with style that no less surprised than delighted me. She is a very pleasant woman free from that affection & Caprice which persons of this description so often discover; the Compass & sweetness of her Voice  was very extraordinary & her taste & execution no less so; But perhaps she would be more impressive on an English ear if she sang more of the Handel &c Songs. The only one she attempted was "Angels ever bright & fair", of which

 

Page 402

she sang the first verse most delightfully. The first few notes particularly the C. from thence to the f 5 below & from that to the octave above was exquisite. The Italian song from Porto Gallo, Son Regina, was sung admirably. [Madam Catalani 1780 - 1849 was a famous Italian soprano. She arrived in England in 1806 when Italian opera was very fashionable and commanded up to £200 for a concert.]

 

Friday 13: At Lawton annual Meeting. Mr Macdonald called.

 

Saturday 14: At Newcastle on various matters

 

Sunday 15: At home.

 

Monday 16: At Trentham returning Mr MacDonalds call when Lord & Lady Stafford in the most obliging manner pressed me to stay to dinner & all night it being the last day of Madam Catalanis being there. Lord & Lady Talbot Lord & Lady Harrowly, Mr & Mrs Sneyd of Keele &c. In the morning all the party walking about the Grounds, looking at Ld. Staffords farming Stock &c. On our Return to the House Catalani singing. Quite in fine voice & her performance most delightful. The Evening spent in listening to the exquisite . . . & execution of Catalani after which she danced with Lord Stafford (by far the best Gentleman dancer I have ever seen) & performed a scene from a Comic & one from a serious Opera. Certainly one of the pleasantest days that I ever spent.

 

Tuesday 17: Returned home. In the Evening at the Assembly at Newcastle Mr & Mrs Macdonald when Mr M engaged to dine & take a bed at Linley Wood on Monday next.

 

Wednesday 18: At home. Letter writing &c

 

Thursday 19: Do. Do.

 

Friday 20: At Trentham attending Militia Ballot. Sr. Jno Chetwode Messrs Mainwaring Heathcote Spode & self, Deputation (Mr Whitehead & Mr John Westerton) from the Potters engaged in the . . . Trade to ask my advice & assistance relative to an Application proposed to be made to Government for some Compensation out of the . . . [Bortz] taken at Copenhagen for Losses sustained in the Trade to Denmark Holland &c when I promised to have a Conversation with Mr Macdonald on the subject. Afterwards

 

Page 403

dining with Mr Blunt at Mr Butts where I staid all night. Uncommonly heavy fall of snow.

 

Saturday 21: Returned home. Newcastle meeting Mr Hales & Mr John Newton relative to the Agreement between the Navign. Co. & Messrs. Sparrow & Hales in order finally to fix the price to be paid per day for working the Steam Engine, when some further Inquiry & Calculation was found to be necessary & appointed to meet again on the 30th inst.

 

Sunday 22: At home.

 

Monday 23: Do. Mr Macdonald, Sneyd, Butt, R. Bent, T. Bent, W. Bent, Sparrow & Blunt dined. Mr Heathcote & Mr Wedgwood who were to have been of the party prevented coming the former by Indisposition, the latter absent. Pleasant day.

 

Tuesday 24: This morning much Conversation with Mr Macdonald relative to the Elections, the Potters Applicatn. to Government &c. when he took the papers relative to the latter along with him & promised to write to me on the subject in a few days. I also leant him the two Volumes containing the proceedings of the H of Commons on the Petition in 1802. He staid till between one & two oClock. Afterwards writing to Mr Whitehead. Meadows floating &c.

 

Wednesday 25: At home. In the morning engaged on the Farm. Mr & Mrs Robinson of Swinnerton Dr & Mrs Northern & Miss Wedgwood of Darlaston at dinner.

 

Thursday 26: In the morning our party all of whom had staid all night left us. Miss Fletcher & Miss Bent came to dinner. Engaged previous to setting out to Stone tomorrow with Mr R Bent on account of intended Brewery.

 

Friday 27: To Stone. Violent storm of Snow which occasioned considerable difficulty in getting forwards towards the close of our Journey.

 

Saturday 28: Engaged setting out intended Buildings, contracting for well sinking & other parts of the work &c. &c. long and busy day.

 

Sunday 29: Returned to Linley Wood.

 

Page 404

Monday 30: At Newcastle meeting Mr Jno Hales & Mr Jno Martin pursuant to appointment to the Cockshead Engine &c.

 

December, [1807] Tuesday 1: At Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee.

 

Wednesday 2: Do. Returned late.

 

Thursday 3: At Burslem attending Meeting of the Potters engaged in the foreign trade relative to the intended Application to Government drawing up Resolutions &c.

 

Friday 4: At home engaged on various matters. Correcting & copying Resolutions of Meeting and writing Letter therewith to Mr Macdonald.

 

Saturday 5: At home. Messrs. Boughey, Fenton of the 4th Dragoons, Powys Mr Bent & Mr R Bent dined, the three former all night. In the evening Mr Skerrett.

 

Sunday 6: Mr Hill of the Hough relative to proving the late Mrs Tollets will, fixed Thursday 17th inst. at Sandbach. Snow.

 

Monday 7: At home engaged with Mr Skerrett. severe frost.

 

Tuesday 8: At Macclesfield Mr Bent Mr Skerrett & Self dining with Mr Hindley. Satisfactory appearance of the Concern. Much pleased with Mrs W. H.

 

Wednesday 9: At home. Mr Skerrett. Mr R Skerrett dined.

 

Thursday 10: Mr Skerrett left Linley Wood. Engaged at home on various matters.

 

Friday 11: At Trentham Inn early attending D. Lieutenancy Meeting swearing in Militia. Sirs Jno. Chetwode J Fletcher Mr Mainwaring Capt Heathcote Mr Smith & Self. The three former left early. Long & fatiguing day being engaged till near six o'Clock. At night great fog & Snow.

 

Saturday 12: At home. Engaged relative to the Potters Applicatn. &c.

 

Sunday 13: Do.

 

Monday 14: At Newcastle meeting Mr Whitehead Mayer(sic) &c. relative to the intended Applicatn. to Government when I undertook to draw up a Memorial on their behalf to be addressed to Mr . . .[Canning] to the Secretary of State for foreign affairs.

 

Tuesday 15: Engaged on various matters. In the Evening attending Newcastle Assembly of which Eliza was one of the Managers.

 

Page 405 (43)

Wednesday 16: At home. Engaged on farm &c

 

Thursday 17: At Sandbach meeting Mr Armstead, Mr Hill & Mr Hinchliffe proving the will of the late Mrs Tollett.

 

Friday 18: At Trentham Inn attending Militia Meeting. Mr Heathcote Mr Mainwaring & self. Long & fatiguing day.

 

Saturday 19: At home. Engaged with Mr Penlington & his son who dined. Receiving Rents &c.

 

Sunday 20: Do. In the Evening Mr Wood.

 

Monday 21: At Burslem with Mr Wood surveying new Engine Works &c.

 

Tuesday 22: At Madeley attending Militia Meeting Sr. Jno Chetwode Sr. J H &self

 

Wednesday 23: At Newcastle attending Meetings on Newcastle lower Canal and Junction Do.

 

Thursday 24: At home. Engaged previous to setting off tomorrow to Nantwich. Arranging various papers &c.

 

Friday 25: At Nantwich. Eliza Ann Emma & Louisa. Dined at Mr Skerretts

 

Saturday 26: Do

 

Sunday 27: Do. The Anniversary of the Birth of my dear Son.

 

Monday 28: At Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee. Rode the whole on horseback without stopping though wet & uncomfortable day at Stone at 12. Mr Sparrow . . .[hill] & self & engaged till very late.

 

Tuesday 29: Do. General Committee. Lord Harrodly.

 

Wednesday 30: At Trentham Inn Lieutenancy Meeting. Sir Jno Chetwode Sir Jno Heathcote  Mr Heathcote Mr Mainwaring from thence to Newcastle slept at Stoney fields. Met on the road from Trentham Inn Mr Macdonald to whom I had sent the Drft. of the intended memorial on behalf of the Potters.

 

Thursday 31: Attending Meeting at Newcastle on both Canals: also Mr Whitehead & Mr Warburton reading over memorial which they highly & warmly approved, & it was resolved to wait the Return on Lord Granville Leveson Gower in order that he might be desired to transmit the same to the Secretary of State, Returned to Nantwich.

 

Page 406

[Blank page]

 

Page 407

1808

January, Friday 1: Returned to Nantwich. Dined at Mr Skerretts Sir Thos Broughton Mr Hill &c &c.

 

Saturday 2: at Do

 

Sunday 3: Do

 

Monday 4: Do

 

Tuesday 5: Do

 

Wednesday 6: Do. Mr Bent dined at Mr Skerretts

 

Thursday 7: Returned to Linley Wood

 

Friday 8: At home

 

Saturday 9: At Madeley attending Militia Meeting

 

Sunday 10: At Nantwich in consequence of the illness of my sister who we found in a most dangerous state.

 

Monday 11: Returned to Linley Wood leaving Eliza at Nantwich.

 

Tuesday 12: At Trentham Inn attending Militia Meeting

 

Wednesday 13 to Tuesday 19: [dates listed but no entry]

 

Wednesday 20: Set off to Liverpool Mr & R Bent & self.

 

Thursday 21: Engaged looking over Brewery & meeting with Mr Meek. Returned to Knutsford

 

Friday 22: At Macclesfield setting annual Acct.

 

 

Saturday 23: Do. Do. Returned home at night

 

Sunday 24: At Nantwich. Sister still in a precarious state Returned on the Evening with Eliza. Stamford  returned from Cambridge.

 

Monday 25: At Newcastle attending Militia Meeting. Also Meeting of the Potters previous to Mr Warburton going to London with the Memorial. dined at Mr T Sparrows.

 

Tuesday 26: At home having been prevented by various Circumstances & Engagements from accompanying Sr. Jno Heathcote & Mr Bent to Shrewsbury.

 

Page 408

Wednesday 27: At home. Engaged on various matters particularly preparing statement of the Evidence which I should be enabled to give before the Committee of the House of Commons relative to the Newcastle Election & which I had been requested to do by Mr Macdonald.

 

Thursday 28: At Newcastle. Engaged at Mr Fentons comparing Statement of Evidence with Books Minutes &c. & afterwards dined. Poole, Sparrow, Sneyd, Bagshaw J S Co

 

Friday 29: At Trentham Inn attending Appeals under Assessed Taxes Sr. Jno Chetwode & self. From thence to Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee. Engaged late

 

Saturday 30: Do. Returned in the Evening

 

Sunday 31: At Stoneyfields to dinner. Meeting Mr Meek of Liverpool and negotiating further for purchase of Liverpool Brewery; but further enquiries being necessary Mr Meek promised to write & give us an answer by post on Thursday next.

 

February, [1808] Monday 1: At Do. engaged on Do. & afterwards on the Election & Navign. business.

 

Tuesday 2: At home. Writing Letters to Mr Bootle & Mr Macdonald &c. &c. Afterwards at Burslem with Eliza where a Letter overtook us with an Account of my Sisters having again had a Relapse and requesting our presence. Returned immediately & set off to N. E & self but found her better than we had expected.

 

Wednesday 3: Returned home leaving Eliza at N.

 

Thursday 4: At home. Engaged settling annual Accounts &c. &c.

 

Friday 5: Do. Engaged on the farm & various matters.

 

Saturday 6: At Alsager attending Meeting of Trustees relative to the Election of a School Master in the room of Mr Babington decd. Mr Hinchliffe Mr Rowley & self. Lord Crewe being unexpectedly prevented from attending. In the Evening much indisposed with a Cold.

 

Sunday 7: being unwell. In bed greatest part of the day.

 

Monday 8: Mr Tomlinson & Mr Fenton relative to Recovery intended to be suffered of . . .[?chattels] belonging to Thos . . .[Berads] Esqr. late in Mortge. to Mrs Bentley & in which it was thought proper for Mrs C & I to join

 

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Perusing Drats. &c. & signing the requisite Documents. Afterwards At Newcastle attending in Reference Turner & Chell. Returned to dinner but very unwell. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 9: At home. Still unwell & in bed a considerable part of the day.

 

Wednesday 10: Do.

 

Thursday 11: Do. prevented going to Newcastle Assembly. In the Evening so heavy a fall of Snow that the Company could not get from the Shakespeare & about 20 persons sat up all night.

 

Friday 12: Elizth Eliza Mary Ann & Miss Stamford returned at noon. So much Snow lay on the road to the farm (being upwards of 3 feet deep) that a road could not be cut through, & with difficulty one was made over the high ground & the meadow of the farm yard having a dozen or 15 people at work all the morning.

 

Saturday 13: At Newcastle with Mr Bent relative to Mr Giles, Liverpool Brewery &c. Returned to dinner but much snow. This & the preceding night lost two lambs which I suppose to have been taken by a fox one having been seen about.

 

Sunday 14: At home. Extremely cold & severe.

 

Monday 15: Do. The weather which had been very cold at night began to change about eleven oClock this morning & a fine mild thaw succeeded. On looking over my flock of Sheep I found I had this morning in the whole 10 lambs. Two or three of which had been yeaned [to bring forth i.e. born] 10 days. All the Sheep healthy & well though they had had no Turnips through the severe weather & nothing but a very little Hay provided for them & of which they had eat scarcely any at all. Alcock.

 

Tuesday 16: At Newcastle attending Militia Ballot. Returned to dinner. Messrs. Sneyd & Sparrow T Fenton Poole & Bagshaw dined.

 

[Not dated but should be Wednesday 17:] At Newcastle again to consider & determine upon the purchase of Liverpool Brewery; when it was resolved

 

Page 410

that Mr R Bent & I shd. set off tomorrow Morning for the purpose of endeavouring to treat with Mr Meek, & if it could be done in fair terms to purchase. Mr Bent came to dinner.

 

Thursday 18: Set off for Liverpool & arrived there about 5oClock in the Evening engaged with Mr Dennison previous to meeting Mr Meeke in the Morning.

 

Friday 19: Engaged wit Mr Meeke all day when I finally agreed for the purchase. Afterwards at Eton where we slept.

 

Saturday 20: Engaged drawing up Agreement which being fully approved by Mr Eden Mr Meekes Attorney the same was signed by the Parties. returned to Eton in the Evening after having accomplished this important business which had been attended with much trouble & anxiety.

 

Sunday 21: returned home to dinner, found Mr Bent Jas, Bent & Mr Wood, all of whom dined. Mr Jos. Wedgwood had been here relative to the disputes between the . . .[Parish] of Stone & various others with the Navig. Co. about to be agitated in Parliament but which it was thought by my Interference might be settled. Mr Wood all night.

 

Monday 22: At Newcastle meeting Mr Jos. Wedgwood when I finally agreed to meet a delegation of not more than two Gentlemen on Thursday, if there was a real disposition towards fair & candid . . .[hea..dation]. Engaged on the business Turner & Chell when I finally advised the Umpire Mr Jardin to proceed no further. Dined at Mr Bents Dr. & R Bent.

 

Tuesday 23: At home but very unwell. Engaged settling Navign. papers intended to be printed, but which had been sent by

 

Page 411 

Mr Sparrow for my previous perusal & Correction. 

 

[JC makes one of his frequent errors in day/date for the next 3 entries. The days run through but the dates have been overwritten, 26th missed out altogether. He has also crossed out two entries and rewritten one on a different day. I believe what I have rendered below to be correct but it is not clear which entry is for Wed. 24th.]

 

Wednesday 24: Mr Skerrett came to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour 

 

Thursday 25: Engaged with Mr Skerrett at Newcastle . . . with . . .  . . . various matters

 

Friday 26: Mr Skerrett left Linley Engaged on papers for journey & business on the Newcastle Election Committee

 

Saturday 27: Set off this morning to London with Mr Tho Sparrow. Arrived at Coventry.

 

Sunday 28: To Barnet

 

Monday 29: London. Took my abode at the Bedford Cov. Garden

 

March, [1808] Tuesday 1: Attending when committee balloted. Party dined at Bedford

 

Wednesday 2: Attending Committee

 

Thursday 4: Do.

 

Friday 4: Do

 

Saturday 5: Do. When I went through my examination before the Committee. I had the satisfaction to be informed that Mr . . .  . . .[Sert. Lens] Counsel for Mr Fletcher in making his final observations to the Committee said that he wished me to be informed from him that I had given my Evidence in a fair Liberal & truly . . .[&ldots;.able] manner

 

Sunday 6: Dined at Peaches

 

Monday 7: Unwell unable to attend at the Committee Room. Committee determined in fav. of sitting Members.

 

Tuesday 8: Viewing Lord Staffords Gallery of pictures which he had been so kind as to open privately for the inspection of his Staffordshire friends. Kind & polite Reception by Lord & Lady Stafford & Lord Gower. Highly gratified with the morning. Long & very . . . & confidential private Conversation with Lady Stafford relative to the Election Fletcher &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 9: Called at Mr Barths & Mr Macdonalds

 

Thursday 10 Do. Mr Boughey.

 

Page 412

Friday 11: Engaged packing &c. previous to leaving London

 

Saturday 12: Set off with Mr T Sparrow from London in a postchaise about ½ past ten o'Clock arrived at Dunchurch that night.

 

Sunday 13: Once more arrived in this Mansion of peace happiness & rest but much fatigued.

 

Monday 14: At home. Unwell

 

Tuesday 15: Do. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 16: Do. Engaged in arranging papers &c.

 

Thursday 17 Do. Do.

 

Friday 18: Do. Do.

 

Saturday 19: At Burnham

 

Sunday 20: At home. Mr & R Bent dined. Liverpool Brewery &c.

 

Monday 21: At home. Alcock. Unwell & confined to the House

 

Tuesday 22: Do. Drawing Draft of Articles relative to Liverpool Brewery

 

Wednesday 23: Do. Mr & Miss Percival came to dinner

 

Thursday 24: Do Unwell

 

Friday 25: Do

 

Saturday 26: Do.

 

Sunday 27: Do. Mr Armistead relative to Mrs Tolletts Affairs & who staid all night

 

Monday 28: Do. Messrs. Wedgwood Mr Bart & Capt. Bart dined In the Evening Mr Atkinson

 

Tuesday 29: Do. Letter writing to sundry persons. Mr & Miss Percival left us.

 

Wednesday 30: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 31: Do. Prevented attending at the Assizes being unwell but rode to Alsager Lodge to meet Mr Hinchliffe Mr Wilbraham &c. & making Appointment of the Revd. Mr Richardson to the Curacy of School

 

Page 413

April, [1808] Friday 1: At home. Engaged drawing Articles for Liverpool Brewery

 

Saturday 2: At Burslem

 

Sunday 3: At home. Mr & R Bent dined. Perusing Drat. of Articles &c. &c.

 

Monday 4: At home.

 

Tuesday 5: At Stone attending Select Committee but neither Mr Sparrow nor Mr Webb attended. Mr Simpson & self. Returned at night.

 

Wednesday 6: At Mr Wilbrahams Rode hall to dinner. Genl. & Mrs Broughton Mr & Mrs Hinchliffe Mr & Miss Stanley.

 

Thursday 7: At Newcastle to have met Mr Beckett to have finished business relating to the property on the Marsh but Mr Martin had postponed the business. On my return called on Mr Sneyd. Bradwall on account of his Accident

 

Friday 8: At home. Mr Wood came to dinner & staid all night.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Mr Peter Bayley dined. In the Evening went to Nantwich

 

Sunday 10: Returned at night from Nantwich

 

Monday 11: At home. Engaged on various matters & on Navign. papers previous to meeting Mr Jno. Martin at Burslem tomorrow to fix the payment to be made by the Company per day for working the Cockshead Engine.

 

Tuesday 12: At Burslem meeting Martin when I finally settled this long protracted Business & which for a great length of time past had been the subject of much trouble & vexation to all the parties. Daily payment when Engine at work £5.5s

 

Wednesday 13: At home. 

 

Thursday 14: In the Morning Mr R Bent relative to Liverpool Brewery. Afterwards at Burslem. Delivered to Mr Wood Conveyance of Land in Burslem from the Assigns of Ralph Wedgwood to J Caldwell in order that the same might be sent to London to be executed by R Wedgwood.

 

Friday 15: At Do. Engaged with Mr Wood on various matters relating to the Colliery &c. Returned in the Evening.

 

Page 414

Saturday 16: At home.

 

Sunday 17: At Stoneyfields & Basford

 

Monday 18: At Stone. Select Committee

 

Tuesday 19: Do. General Committee

 

Wednesday 20: Do. General Assembly. Returned in the Evening to Linley Wood.

 

Thursday 21: Set off with Sr. Jno Heathcote & Mr Bent to Shrewsbury

 

Friday 22: Engaged closely with the Books settling the same & the annual Statement of the Concern

 

Saturday 23: Do. in the morning. Returned to Stoneyfields slept there

 

Sunday 24: Returned home fatigued & unwell from the weeks exertion

 

Monday 25: At home

 

Tuesday 26: At Newcastle on various matters. In the Evening received Abstracts of Title to Brewery at Liverpool. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 27: At Newcastle again with Abstracts of Title & explaining the same to Messrs W & R Bent. Dined at Stoneyfields when it was determined that I shd. write to Mr Lace[?Luce] to state various observations on the Title &c.

 

Thursday 28: Engaged writing long letter to Mr Luce and afterwards at Newcastle shewing(sic)  the same to Mr Bent previous to sending it away

 

Friday 29: At home.

 

Saturday 30: At Newcastle meeting Mr Jno. Beckett & to have finished the business relative to the Marsh buildings but the matter was postponed.

 

May, [1808] Sunday 1: At home.

 

Monday 2: At Burslem

 

Tuesday 3: Mr Skerrett came to Linley Wood also Mr Wood & Enoch Mr Edburton relative to Sr. Tho Broughtons purchase of the Salt Works &c all dined.

 

Wednesday 4: Engaged with Mr Skerrett & Mr Wood

 

Thursday 5: At Burslem with Mr Skerrett

 

Friday 6: Mr Skerrett left us but previously Mr W Penlington came with . . . settled future Application of the Rents of the Estates of which

 

Page 415

£100 per annum to be applied in liquidation of Arrears of Interest. Afterwards at Newcastle on various matters, Cut Asparagus

 

Saturday 7: At home. Writing Letter to P Houghton to accompany Manuscripts intended for Publication. Observations &c.

 

Sunday 8: At home.

 

Monday 9: Sent by Coach from Gibbons's Manuscripts to Houghton. At Newcastle on various matters. Purchased a brown Colt to match Pilot.

 

Tuesday 10: At home. Engaged on the farm. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Wednesday 11: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 12: At Trentham Inn Meeting under Assessed Taxes & property tax. Mr Mainwaring & self a very long & fatiguing day almost the whole of the business falling upon myself. Returned late to dinner.

 

Friday 13: At home.

 

Saturday 14: Do. Engaged on the Farm &c. &c. 

 

Sunday 15: Do. 

 

Monday 16: At Alsager attending Meeting of Trustees of Alsager Church & School

 

Tuesday 17: At home. Turned out the Milking Cows into the Lawn field.

 

Wednesday 18: At Burslem. Afterwards Engaged on the farm. Sheep shearing. Finished setting potatoes

 

Thursday 19: At Burslem

 

Friday 20: Do. Mr Wood & Enoch & Mr Tho Wedgwood dined. 

 

Saturday 21: At home. Engaged on the farm & various matters

 

Sunday 22: At Stoneyfields. Elizabeth & Self & Stamford dining  Mr & Mrs W Hindley.

 

Monday 23: At Newcastle. Executing Articles of Partnership Macclesfield Brewery.

 

Tuesday 24: At Betley dining at Sr. Tho. Fletchers. Bayleys & Mr Sneyds.

 

Wednesday 25: At home. Engaged on farm

 

Thursday 26: Do. Mr N Heathcote Miss Allens & Mr & Mrs Wedgwood

 

Friday 27: Do. Engaged perusing & . . . papers received from Liverpool relative to the Title to the Brewery.

 

Saturday 28: Do. Party left us.

 

Sunday 29: Do. Mr & Mrs W Hindley & Mr & Mrs Bent & R Bent at Linley Wood

 

Monday 30: Do. Engaged with Mr Hindley who with Mrs H left us in the Evening

 

Tuesday 31: At Newcastle attending Meeting of Trustees of Newcastle & finally settling Account of purchase monies &c. Afterwards settling

 

Page 416

with Mr Jno Smith payment to be made for the duties on Mrs Newhams & Mary Hills Annuities under the Will of Mrs Bentley & Miss Stamford. Afterwards dined at Noahs Ark Bowling green meeting & returned with R Bent.

 

June, [1808] Wednesday 1: Set off with R Bent to Eton finally to settle respecting the Title to the Brewery & arrived in the Evening

 

Thursday 2: Engaged all day at Liverpool with Mr Lace &c. when in consequence of various difficulties which had arisen we determined to send to Mr Bent & request his Attendance in order that we might be all together on the spot.

 

Friday 3: At Liverpool again Engaged with Mr Slater & various other persons & drawing out particulars of what I thought requisite to be done by the vendor previous to our accepting the Title. Anxious & fatiguing day.

 

Saturday 4: At Liverpool again. Meeting Mr Bent when the vendor having agreed to do several matters required my me we finally agreed to take the Title. Dined all together at Eton after which Mr & R Bent set off on their Return. Miss Wallace being to accompany me tomorrow

 

Sunday 5: Left Eton with Miss Wallace & got home to dinner, but much fatigued & overcome with the hurry & anxiety of the business in which I had been for the last few days engaged.

 

Monday 6: At home Engaged settling various Accounts. Letters &c. &c.

 

Tuesday 7: At Butterton calling upon Mr Swinnerton. Returned to dinner

 

Wednesday 8: At home. Engaged on various matters

 

Thursday 9: Do.

 

Thursday 10: At Burslem from thence to Newcastle on Liverpool Brewery business & to have settled with Mr Martin the final adjustment of Marsh purchases. Attending a long time at the Public Office assisting the Mayor &c. on hearing of prosecutn. for treading Malt ag. . . .[Myarch]. Miss Crompton & Miss M Crompton arrived.

 

Friday 11: This day served by Mr James with Ejectmt. [ejectment - dismiss tenant by legal process] at the suit of Mr Lawton who had determined to try the validity of my Lease of

 

Page 417

Swallow Moor wood. In the Eveng. at Newcastle on this & other business.

 

Sunday 12: At home.

 

Monday 13: At Newcastle advising with Mr Martin relative to the . . .[perpenant] made appertaining Appearance to the Ejectmt. &c. &c. & giving Instructions for defence & in various other matters. Returned to dinner, Alcock.

 

Tuesday 14: At Sandon attending meeting of the Select Committee. Messrs Sparrow Webb Simpson & self. Returned home late after a fatiguing day.

 

Wednesday 15: At home. Engaged on various matters. Drawing Case relative to Swallow Moor Wood. &c. Mr Munday

 

Thursday 16: Do.

 

Friday 17: At Trentham Inn Meeting of Commrs. Land, Property & Assessed Taxes. Sr. Jno Heathcote & self. Long & hard day but returned late to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour

 

Saturday 18: At home. Messrs. R & T Bent dined

 

Sunday 19: Do.

 

Monday 20: At Newcastle on various matters. Dined at Stoney field & Newcastle meeting Sir John Heathcote & Mr Barrow arranging matters respecting the latter at Shrewsbury when it was finally determined that he should make a trial for 3 months of the out of door business.

 

Tuesday 21: At Burslem on sundry matters. Left with Mr Wood Drat. of Conveyance which I had perused of Land purchased from Sant. Returned to dinner.

 

Wednesday 22: At Newcastle. Finally settling with Mr Rd. Crewe the business of his purchase of Dwelling house on the Marsh. Executing Deeds receiving purchase monies &c. &c. long conversation with Mr Bent & Mr Combes relative to the unfortunate state of the Affairs of Mr Gorton, on which they wished to have my advice, when I engaged to dine with Mr Gorton &c. at Stoneyfields on Saturday for the purpose of considering & advising what will be the best to be done.

 

Thursday 23: At home. Mowed the slope from the Turnips. Engaged close on various papers & Accounts

 

[Not dated but should be Friday 24:] Do.  Very wet day. Engaged at the Bank. Letter from Mr

 

Page 418

Slater relative to Mr Stricklands sinking a part well at the Liverpool Brewery & writing Letter to him.

 

Saturday 25: At Stoneyfields Advising relative to the Affairs of Mr Gorton, which had been reduced to a most minor state. Dined. Mr Combes. Long Conversation & Recommended a Meeting of the Creditors to be immediately called & leave it to them to decide whether a Trust deed shd. be executed or a Commission taken out. pitiful business!

 

Sunday 26: At home.

 

Monday 27: Set out with Mr & R Bent to Eton. Arrived in the Evng.

 

Tuesday 28: At Liverpool all day Engaged on Brewery Concerns

 

Wednesday 29: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 30: Do. till afternoon when Mr & R Bent set off on their return home it being fixed for Mrs Crompton to accompany me back tomorrow. Mr Meeke dined at Eton with whom long & serious conversation on the subject of the Wells sinking in his part of the property.

 

July, [1808] Friday 1: Returned from Eton to Linley Wood. Arrived to dinner but greatly fatigued with the business of the last few days.

 

Saturday 2: At home. Began mowing the Meadow & engaged on various affairs

 

Sunday 3: Do.

 

Monday 4: At Newcastle meeting Mr Breck on reference to him & me of dispute between Mr Mayer & Mr Esr. Bloor respecting new inclosed Land which we settled. At the request of Mr Bent staid to dinner in order to a further Conversation with Mr Gorton. long & interesting description of his Affairs.

 

Tuesday 5: At Wolesley Bridge attending meeting of the Select Committee. returned at night.

 

Wednesday 6: At home. Busily engaged in the Hay. Mrs & Miss Comptons left Linley

 

Thursday 7: At home

 

Friday 8: Do Rain.

 

Saturday 9: Do. Ann & Bessy left Linley Wood

 

Sunday 10: Do.

 

Page 419

Monday 11: At Newcastle settling Marsh Accounts with Mr Jno. Beckett. & various other matters. Returned to dinner. Found Mr Ralph of Halifax.

 

Tuesday 12: At Burslem with Mr Ralph & Stamford. Mr & Mrs Wedgwood & two Miss Allens dined

 

Wednesday 13: Mr Ralph left Linley Wood

 

Thursday 14:  At Betley dining at Mr Wm Sneyds

 

Friday 15: At Borlock Long fishing Afterwards Engaged with various Deeds papers &c.

 

Saturday 16: Sr. Jno & Lady Fletcher Mr Boughey Mr L Armistead Miss Fletcher & Miss Armistead & Mr W Sneyd of Betley dined.

 

Sunday 17 At home,

 

Monday 18: Do. Engaged in the Hay

 

Tuesday 19: Do. Do. Drawing Case relative to Swallow Moor Wood

 

Wednesday 20: Do. Finished Hay Harvest

 

Thursday 21: At Newcastle on various matters

 

Friday 22: Engaged with Mr Martin relative to Swallow Moor Wood Case & Proceedings in the Cause. Mr Crompton of Chorley Hall several of the young people came to dinner with whom afterwards engaged.

 

Saturday 23: Mr Crompton &c. left Linley Wood

 

Sunday 24: At home

 

Monday 25: At Marsh Hall. Miss Stamford Elizth. & self & Stamford Mr Butt & Mr Blunt dined

 

Tuesday 26: Do.

 

Wednesday 27: Returned from Marsh Hall 

 

Thursday 28: At home

 

Friday 29: At Mr Gilberts relative to Roughwood Mill  from thence to Burslem

 

Saturday 30: At Newcastle Brewery

 

Sunday 31: At home. Mr Hill called & paid Mrs Tollets Legacy

 

August, [1808] Monday 1: At Etruria

 

Tuesday 2: Do. & at Burslem

 

Wednesday 3: From Etruria to Sandon attending Select Committee Meeting

 

Thursday 4: At home. Engaged in the Affair with Mr Donald & discharged him. Setting Swedish Turnips. [swede]

 

Friday 5: At home

 

Saturday 6: At home

 

[This is the end of this volume but entries are continued "In the beginning of this Book"]

 

Page 41

[Page headed Journal brd. from the End of this Book]

 

Sunday 7: At home.

 

Monday 8: At Newcastle on various matters in reference of a Cause in the King's Bench between Mrs Kelsall of Hall a Wood & Mr Tomlinson of Alsager relative to a Pew in . . .[Bottemly] Church. Engaged all day.

 

Wednesday 9: At Newcastle Races. Dined at the Ordinary. Bent still very ill. With him in the Evening. Returned to Linley late.

 

Thursday 11: Do. Bent better Do. Do.

 

Friday 12: Do. Do. Do. 

 

Saturday 13: At home. Engaged on the farm & various matters

 

Sunday 14: At Newcastle Mr Bent

 

Monday 15: Do. on various matters

 

Tuesday 16: At home. Engaged previous to going to Alsager

 

Wednesday 17: Do. Do.

 

Thursday 18:At Stafford. Served on the Grand Jury. Dined with the Judges. Lawrence & Le Blanc but Mr T Lawrence detained in Court

 

Friday 19: Do. Dined with the Sherriff. On Spl Jury. Ld. Darley & Higgs

 

Saturday 20: This morning commenced at 8 o'Clock the Special Jury Cause of . . .[Ilnett] & Beech on which I had been summoned as a Spl Juror. This was a second trial a verdict having been found at the last Assizes for the Plt. who claimed under a will which it was said had been cancelled since the death of the Testator a Mr Haddinton. After a hearing of 13 hours & a deliberation of an hour by the Jury we found a Verdict for the Defend. the Heir at law to the great satisfaction of the Court, though contrary to a strong summing up by the judge in fav. of the Plt. The Sol. Genl. Sr. Tho. Plumer attended who afterwards said that by our verdict we had done signal service to the country, condemning in strong terms the Judges Address to the Jury. Spl Jurors Sr. Jno Heathcote Freeman Moreton Walhouse Jno Wedgwood & J Caldwell.

 

Page 42

Sunday 21: Returned home from Stafford. Dined at Stoneyfields where I found Bent much better though during my absence he had had a dangerous relapse.

 

Monday 22: At Newcastle on various matters. Shrewsbury Concerns &c.

 

Tuesday 23: At home. Mr Woods family & Mrs Wilson.

 

Wednesday 24: Mr Tho. Wedgwood of Burslem & the Rev Mr Richardson dined

 

Thursday 25: At Lane End all day attending on Arbitration Sr. Jno. Heathcote & Glover relative to Steam Engine & Mill at Lane End. Settled the business satisfactorily to both Parties.

 

Friday 26: At home. Engaged with Mr Wood & family

 

Saturday 27: Do. Do. 

 

Sunday 28: In the Evening Mr Woods family left us

 

Monday 29: At the Rev Mr Robinsons of Swinnerton dined & staid all night

 

Tuesday 30: At Miss Moretons. dined . Returned in the Evening after having appointed with Mr Bent to go myself to Shrewsbury on Thursday.

 

Wednesday 31: Engaged all day with  papers &c. preparatory to my setting off to Shrewsbury. In the Evening went to Stoneyfields. Long conversation with Mr Bent

 

September, [1808] Thursday 1: Set off from Stoneyfields about 7 oClock & arrived at Shrewsbury to dinner. John Bent accompanied me having prevailed upon his father to let him take this little excursion. In the Evening engaged with Mr Hulbert

 

Friday 2: Very closely engaged all day at the Brewery & with various persons. Dined at Mr John Heatherley and for the first time was introduced to Mrs H. who I found to be a very pleasing young woman & very likely to make him comfortable & happy.

 

Saturday 3: Engaged at Do. till the afternoon when we left Shrewsbury & came to . . .[Turnhill]

 

Sunday 4: Dined at Stoneyfields/ Long conversation & discussion with Mr B on the various subjects of my journey. Arrived at home in the evening about 8 oClock. Anxious & fatiguing journey.

 

Page 43

Monday 5: At Burslem in consequence of Letter from Mr Wood relative to Arrangements preferred by Jno & A Gallimon  for getting the Coals in the Bycars. Returned to dinner. Alcock

 

Tuesday 6: At Stone attending Meeting of Select Committee. Close day of Business.

 

Wednesday 7: Do. From thence to Darlaston to dinner & staid all night.

 

Thursday 8: At home. Engaged on various matters.

 

Friday 9: Engaged with Mr Cobday of Sandwell pursuant to Appointment and advising on his Brief & the cases on the Tenants of the Lawton Estates standing for Trial at Chester Assizes the next week - Carrying Wheat. Unwell

 

Saturday 10: Morning from Mr Dennison the Abstracts of the Title to the Porter Brewery at Liverpool together with the Draft of the Conveyance for my perusal previous to their being finally laid before Mr Atkinson. perusing & examining the same accordingly & making various Observations to accompany these papers.

 

Sunday 11: Still very unwell. In the House

 

Monday 12: Having received a Letter in the morning from Mr Bent informing me that he expected Mr Slater at Newcastle this day, on which account & various others he wished to see me, went to Newcastle though still far from well. Long conversation relative to Macclesfield Concern & an uneasiness which had arisen with Mr Hardley relative to the discharging of one of the servants. Shrewsbury &c. &c. Dined at Stoneyfields with Mr Slater & R Bent. Long discussion relative to the works and arrangements carrying on at Liverpool. Returned in the Evening. Sent the Abstracts &c by the Mail to Mr Atkinson Sol. Chancery Lane.

 

Tuesday 13: At Burslem. Colliery &c. &c. Returned home to dinner. Mr Fourchiquour. In the Evening Miss Potts who brought from Dr Crompton the Drft. of the Partnership Articles with Sundry Observations made thereon by the Doctor & Mr Davison

 

Wednesday 14: Engaged perusing articles & observations & making minutes for replies.  

 

Thursday 15: Miss Wedgwood & Miss Morgan at dinner. Mr & Mrs Tollett who were to have been of he party prevented coming. pleasant day.

 

Friday 16:  Do. Mrs Bence and Mr Butt Jno Gladwin R Bent & Mr Batt at dinner

 

Saturday 17: At Newcastle, Brewery Concerns Sr. W . . .[Egertons] Bankruptcy. Returned to dinner. Miss Wedgwood 7 Miss Morgan left Linley.

 

Page 44

Sunday 18: At home

 

Monday 19: At Newcastle.  Mayor Gartons Bankcy. &c. &c. Alcock who staid all night. Musick

 

Tuesday 20: At home. Mr & Mrs Slater &c of Liverpool, with Mr & Mrs W Bent. Long conversation & discussion relative to affairs & works at Liverpool Brewery &c. &c.

 

Wednesday 21: Set off with Mr & Mrs Bent to Manchester in order to attend with the former the second Meeting under Messrs Ruck & Jno Garton Commr of  Bankrtcy at which he & his friends were very desirous that I shd. be present. Arrived at Mrs Sandfords to dinner. Engaged  in the Evening & till late with Mr Garton & Mr Cooke the Solr. under the Commrs, making Statement of Mr Gartons Affairs, & various other Arrangements.